Leoneda Inge

Race and Southern Culture Reporter

Leoneda Inge is WUNC's "Race and Southern Culture Reporter." She is the first public radio journalist in the South to hold such a position, which explores modern and historical constructs to tell stories of poverty and wealth, health and food culture, education and racial identity.

Leoneda's most recent work includes the series, "Perils and Promise," an in-depth series focused on the challenges of rural education in Vance County. Leoneda has also featured reports on "Organic Tobacco," "Rebuilding Slave Cabins" and traveled to Tokyo, Japan tracking the importance of North Carolina’s pork industry to that country.

Leoneda is the recipient of three Gracie Awards from the Alliance for Women in Media and several awards from the Associated Press, the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) and the National Association of Black Journalists. In 2006, she and a team of WUNC journalists won an Alfred I. DuPont Award from Columbia University for the series "North Carolina Voices: Understanding Poverty."

Leoneda is a graduate of Florida A&M University and Columbia University, where she earned her Master's Degree in Journalism as a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Business and Economics. In 2014, Leoneda traveled to Berlin, Brussels and Prague as a German/American Journalist Exchange Fellow with the RIAS Berlin Commission/RTDNF.

Ways to Connect

Princeville, Hurricane Matthew, African Americans
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The tiny town of Princeville, North Carolina is still feeling the effects of Hurricane Matthew, which flooded this historic African-American town in October.

Manufacturing, Textiles, Cotton, American Giant
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Part of President Donald Trump’s appeal is his pledge to bring jobs back to America. There’s a San Francisco apparel manufacturer who has tried his luck both ways – manufacturing abroad and in the US. Today, American Giant has found success in making sure every inch of its casual line of clothing is made in America. And that means it's also made in the Carolinas.

Nigerian Chef Tunde Wey was invited to cook in Durham by the Center for Environmental Farming Systems, CEFS.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Editor's note:  This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

The restaurant at the Durham Hotel is known for its eclectic, changing menu. But on a recent day, visiting Chef Tunde Wey turned it up a notch with a first course that included cow foot, tossed in palm oil, a citrus vinaigrette, kumquats, shallots and jollof rice, a popular dish in many West African countries.

Durham City, Durham County, Aging, Parks and Rec
Durham Parks and Recreation

End of the year and New Year holiday events were popular across the Triangle in recent weeks, but one of the biggest parties was the senior holiday party in Durham. The event sells out every year and is mostly attended by African Americans, despite the area’s diverse population, according to the city's parks and recreation officials. The party is an example that may lend credibility to new research on “social status” and race.

Durham County Library, Books, Durham City, Bond Issue
Durham County Library

There’s good news for Durham County Library patrons and some not so good news. The good news is the main branch of the Durham County Library is about to undergo a multi-million dollar makeover – a full reconfiguration.  The bad news - the library will close January 15 and won’t reopen until 2019.

Women and Work, Dress for Success
Leoneda Inge

A Triangle organization that prides itself with getting women back to work is celebrating its 10,000th client.

Lennon Lacy, Bladenboro, NC NAACP, Hanging
Leoneda Inge

Two years ago, a young African-American male was found hanging from a swing set in Bladenboro, North Carolina. Local and federal law enforcement officials ruled the hanging death of Lennon Lacy, 17, a suicide. But his family is not convinced and suspects Lacy was murdered.

NCCU, Debra Saunders-White, UNC System
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Flowers and other memorials are being placed around the North Carolina Central University campus in Durham as students and staff remember their late chancellor, Debra Saunders-White.

Hillside High School, The Wiz, Musical Theatre
Meredith Wilson / The Durham VOICE

About half of the public school teachers in North Carolina have been in the classroom for less than 10 years. But then you have a high school teacher in Durham who is celebrating 30 years at the same school and has no intention of leaving anytime soon.

Orange County Democratic volunteer Paul Brinich explains the details of a Democratic sample ballot to UNC Chapel Hill student Ashaki George before George enters Chapel Hill First Baptist Church voting site to vote.
Amy Townsend / WUNC

Across North Carolina, voters packed polling places to cast their ballots on a wide range of issues ranging from local bond referendums to a historic presidential race on Tuesday. For many, the end of the contentious election season couldn’t come soon enough.

 

Related: 2016 Election Returns and News

 

a woman walks past a "vote here" sign
Jim Mone / AP

Updated 12:20 a.m.

Republican Richard Burr has defeated Democrat challenger Deborah Ross in the race for U.S. Senate.

“I pledge to you to finish my public service doing all I can to make sure that the next generation feels the full effects of what we can accomplish,” Burr said in his acceptance speech.

The congregation at New Light Missionary Baptist Church in Greensboro, NC took part of an initiative called Souls to the Polls that sought to increase African-American voter turnout in the 2016 general election.
Katie Stephens / WUNC

The battle for votes is in full swing this last week of early voting across North Carolina. Social justice and voting rights groups have been working especially hard to get African Americans to the polls. They say the demographic group holds the key to who wins on November 8th.

Asian American, Asian American Voters, Election 2016
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A new report shows Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial demographic in North Carolina.

It also shows this group of largely independent voters could turn out to be a key swing vote in this upcoming election – if they show up at the polls.

Princeville, Flooding, Race, Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Residents in a small, mostly African-American community in eastern North Carolina are still waiting to see what’s left of their flooded homes since the wrath of Hurricane Matthew.

NC A&T, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Black Voters
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Numbers have consistently shown black voters to overwhelmingly support Barack Obama. And at Tuesday's rally in Greensboro, one would have thought he was running for a third term as President.

Julian Abele, Duke University, Race, Architect, Duke Quad
Courtesy of Duke University

Thousands of faculty, staff, students, alumni and family members walked across Duke University's West Campus over the weekend during Duke’s homecoming.

Just days ago, Duke's Main Quad was officially named in honor of the African-American architect who designed the buildings making up the quad.

Peace and Pride, Charlotte Shooting, Fayetteville Police
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Editor's note:  This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

NCCU, Charlotte Police Shooting, Black Lives Matter
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Some 200 North Carolina Central University students stood in the rain Wednesday night to demonstrate against what they call police violence against people of color.

Old Chapel Hill Cemetery, Chapel Hill, Blacks
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Students, staff and visitors to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill may be familiar with the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery sitting at the top of the knoll on South Road.

Then they also know how segregated the cemetery is – with headstones of whites on one side and blacks on the other.

Sunday, a new headstone was unveiled to remember all the unmarked graves of African Americans buried there.

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

This year, political uncertainty could dampen business investment even after the outcome of the election isn’t uncertain.

Social Media, Teenagers, McKinney, Laura Tierney
thesocialinstitute.com

Many high school students are settling into this year’s classes, but there is one class that is likely not on the school roster: A course on the ins and outs of how to best use social media.

But research shows, much of this generation’s social development will occur while they are online.

John Rintoul, Beehives, Bees, Honey Bee
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The BeeCheck mapping system is getting a lot of attention in North Carolina since an aerial pesticide spraying in South Carolina killed millions of honey bees.

Lennon Lacy, Bladenboro, NC NAACP, Hanging
Leoneda Inge

Two years ago today, 17-year-old Lennon Lacy was found hanging from a swing set in a Bladenboro, North Carolina trailer park.

Durham, Black Banking, Cicely Mitchell, Art of Cool
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

From Atlanta to Chicago, black-owned banks in big cities across the country have reported a rise in new accounts during the past month. One of the oldest black-owned banks in the country is based in Durham, where bank officials report a rise in new accounts and in a new movement to keep the momentum going.

American Underground
www.americanunderground.com

African-American startup companies are vying for a coveted spot in Durham's Black Founders event.

Durham-based American Underground, along with the Google for Entrepreneurs Exchange Program, is organizing the week-long event later this year as a way to encourage diverse business startups, according to Jessica Averhart, American Underground's Director of Corporate Partnerships. 

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