Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 11 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau with Jorge Valencia and Reema Khrais. Jeff started at WUNC, as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He covered a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

An image of a person rallying outside a voting rights trial in Winston-Salem
Kimberly Pierce Cartwright / WNCU Public Radio 90.7 FM

The first week of a federal trial challenging North Carolina’s voting regulations is wrapping up in Winston-Salem. The plaintiffs - a group including the U.S. Department of Justice,  the NAACP, and League of Women Voters - aim to prove whether House Bill 589, enacted in 2013 by a Republican-led state legislature discriminated against minority voters.

Photo: Rosanell Eaton and Mary E. Perry
Jorge Valencia

The federal trial challenging North Carolina's new voting regulations continues Tuesday morning in Winston-Salem.

Inside the courtroom yesterday were opening arguments and testimony from seven witnesses. An attorney for the plaintiffs, Penda Hare, called this case a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement, one she says will have a lasting and decisive impact on African American and Latino voters for years to come.

Outside the courthouse was a massive Moral Monday protest and a march through downtown.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says fighting human trafficking is one of her priorities.
Jeff Tiberii

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch spoke about fighting human trafficking this morning in North Carolina. The nation's  top prosecutor described human trafficking as modern-day slavery during a visit to the Triangle on Wednesday.

"Whether it is sexual trafficking, whether it is forced labor, but it is quite frankly the 21st century scourge of our time- and it really has no place in modern society, it has no place in the country, it has no place in this state," said Lynch.

Lynch praised federal prosecutors based here for their efforts to stop trafficking.

Sons of Confederate Veterans specialty license plate
North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles /

Two of the most powerful officials in the state are pointing fingers at each other in a dispute over who has the authority to stop the production of Confederate license plates. Governor Pat McCrory and Senate Pro Tem Phil Berger claim to lack the authority to mandate that the DMV to no longer issue the controversial plates.

The IBMA's new Exeutive Director Paul Schiminger.
Rebecca Martinez / WUNC

The International Bluegrass Music Association has announced the lineup of artists that will play the World of Bluegrass festival this fall.

Allison Krauss and Union Station Featuring Jerry Douglas will headline the event. It'll be held in Raleigh for the second year in a row. The Sam Bush band will also perform.

Paul Schiminger is the new Executive Director of the IBMA.

Schiminger says says Raleigh was very accommodating to festival goers last year.

Henry McCollum and Leon Brown are getting full pardons from the Governor after spending more than three decades in prison. The victim in this case was Sabrina Buie. In 1983 the 11-year-old girl was raped and murdered in Robeson County.  Brothers McCollum and Brown were tried and convicted for the murders. They never stopped declaring their innocence. Six years ago their case was reopened, and in 2014 the men were exonerated, due in part to DNA evidence. On Thursday Gov. Pat McCrory granted pardons, after months of review.

Statement from the Henry McCollum and Leon Brown:

Governor McCrory's recommended budget
NC Office of State Budget and Management

Government employees across the state are working on budgets this month. Officials in rural towns, big cities and the Capitol are finalizing spending plans for the fiscal year beginning July 1st. But the process, speed and  public involvement required to craft a fiscal blueprint can vary significantly.

A couple of weeks ago, House lawmakers held a marathon floor session where they debated their budget proposal for more than eight hours. Toward the end of the debate, senior Republican budget writer Nelson Dollar rose from his seat to make a final pitch.

Photo: Craig Johnson (left) and Shawn Long (center) with their son Isaiah Johnson.
Equality NC

North Carolina lawmakers pushed through two of the year’s most controversial measures on Wednesday afternoon, limiting debate and quickly ushering proposals that could reduce some same-sex couples’ access to marriage ceremonies and extend the waiting period for abortion procedures.

While House and Senate members debated in separate hearings, the measures over gay marriage and abortions are intertwined social issues that attract vigorous advocacy from conservative and liberal groups.

NC legislature

Two controversial bills are scheduled for debate in legislative committees Wednesday afternoon. One of the proposals has undergone significant changes prior to debate. Some are calling those alterations completely unrelated.

NC Legislative building
NC General Assembly

Following delays, divisions and more than eight hours of debate House lawmakers gave approval to a $22 billion state budget early Friday.

The plan increases state spending by more than a billion dollars, though the road to passage was hardly smooth. Deliberations on the measure were delayed by more than a day following criticism of the budget draft from some members and conservative groups.