Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with six regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about the state House budget, which lawmakers passed early Friday morning. The House plan would cut taxes, fund pay increases for some teachers, and give an across-the-board $1,000 raise to state employees. It would also add $260 million  to the state's 'rainy day' fund.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the House budget with Associated Press Statehouse Reporter Gary Robertson.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Legislators in the North Carolina House are expected to approve their budget plan this evening. Under this spending proposal, teachers would receive a 3.3 percent raise, on average; retired state employees would get a modest cost of living adjustment; and taxes would be cut by an estimated $350 million.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

House Republicans are taking a turn in the budget spotlight as they detail their spending plan for the state. The $22.9 billion spending plan calls for about $350 million in tax cuts, provides teacher raises and more for state retirees. This budget is closer to the plan passed by the Republican-led state Senate, than the vision laid out by Democratic Governor Roy Cooper.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, a conversation about the Supreme Court's decision to strike down two congressional districts in North Carolina; an analysis of state laws that end up in court; and a review of what we know about the House budget proposal.

the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Updated at 11 a.m., May 22, 2017

State lawmakers were handed their latest legal defeat Monday, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down two of the state's congressional districts because race played too large a role in their creation. Since 2011, more than a dozen Republican-backed bills have been struck down in federal and state courts.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about the "raise the age" bill, voter identification, and an audit detailing misuse of funds at the state's largest managed mental care organization.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this edition of the WUNC politics podcast, a conversation with Rose Hoban of North Carolina Heath News.

Ben and Jerry's, Voter ID
Leoneda Inge

The Supreme Court will not review North Carolina’s invalidated Voter ID Law, leaving in place a ruling by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals that had struck down the law. A lower court ruled that some provisions in the law "target African Americans with almost surgical precision," and therefore unconstitutional.

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

This week in state politics, a look at the budget.

Jeff Tiberii talks with Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of the N.C. Justice Center on the $22.9 billion spending plan passed by the North Carolina Senate.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the Senate budget with Loretta Boniti of Spectrum News.

The Senate passed a spending proposal, but not before some late-night wrangling and more than a few surprises.

The final spending bill wasn't passed until 3 a.m., well after many journalists thought.

State Senate chamber
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Updated at 12:53 p.m., June 21, 2017

North Carolina state senators are expected to give final approval to a $23 billion dollar state budget Wednesday afternoon.

Photo: Senate Leader Phil Berger, a Republican from Rockingham County
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

State Senators rolled out a $22.9 billion spending plan Tuesday afternoon at the General Assembly. This spending proposal represents an increase of 2.5 percent over the current budget and is a significant step in the protracted budget process.

Journalist Mark Binker died April 29, 2017.
Courtesy N.C. Insider

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, memories of Mark Binker.

The widely respected journalist and experienced member of the North Carolina Capitol Press Corps, died unexpectedly Saturday morning. He was 43.

Mark Binker
WRAL TV

Mark Binker, a widely respected journalist and experienced member of the North Carolina Capitol Press Corps, died unexpectedly Saturday morning. He was 43.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about crossover week, a decade's old legislative tradition in which a self-mandated deadline requires bills to advance from one chamber to another, or die.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, a conversation with Jessica Huseman, senior reporting fellow at ProPublica.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Updated 11:50 a.m., 4/28/2017

Thursday's crossover deadline came and went with a bang. Debate got heated when House Minority Leader Darren Jackson (D-Wake) objected to a final vote on House Bill 113. The measure allows for private citizens to take their local governments and police departments to court for failing to comply with immigration law enforcement.

It was clear Jackson believed Republicans violated a bi-partisan agreement on which bills would get a final vote just ahead of the deadline--Jackson said HB 113 was not one of them. Nonetheless, Jackson backed down when it was clear he was being outmaneuvered by the GOP leadership. The bill survived crossover and moved on to the Senate.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

At the General Assembly it's "crossover week." That means lawmakers in Raleigh are scurrying about and busier than usual as they try to advance dozens of bills before a self-mandated cutoff for legislation to cross over from one chamber to the other.

Cedar Fork Elementary in Wake County would have to add three more kindergarten classrooms under the class-size change scheduled to go into effect in the fall.
Jess Clark / WUNC

Republican lawmakers say they have a compromise to reduce elementary class sizes while addressing concerns from local school districts.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNC Politics Podcast, a conversation with long-time political reporter Mark Binker.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a conversation about the projected effects of tax cuts, a constitutional challenge to the General Assembly, judicial restructuring and a failed craft beer proposal.

Blue Ridge Community College hopes to offer a degree in craft beer brewing starting this fall.
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr, Creative Commons

Lawmakers are abandoning efforts to increase the self-distribution limit for craft brewers.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a conversation about a number of high-profile, yet long-shot proposals at the General Assembly.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

Policymakers in Raleigh filed some symbolic proposals this week that are not expected to advance. One seeks to ban same-sex marriage, while another would require the University of North Carolina and N.C. State to leave the ACC Conference for its boycott over House Bill 2.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about go-nowhere bills, crossover and other proposals at the state legislature with Western Carolina University Political Science Professor Chris Cooper.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Following last week's compromise on a repeal of House Bill 2, lawmakers turned their attention to a number of other notable issues including tax cuts, environmental regulations, executive authority, board of governor's elections, state courts and school calendars. 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about state, national and international politics with Dan Boylan, former reporter for the NC Insider.

Durty Bull Brewing Company just north of downtown Durham
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

The king of beers is, well, still the king of beers. But the hundreds of small breweries, including many in North Carolina, are quickly gaining steam.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Time to review what was a chaotic week. Legislators passed a measure that repealed House Bill 2, the controversial state law that limited protections for LGBT people.

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