Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, we talk with Loretta Boniti, a senior political reporter at Time Warner Cable.

The countdown to Election Day is on, and candidates are hitting the trail in North Carolina. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump visited the state earlier this week and democratic nominee Hillary Clinton stops in Winston-Salem later today, in a joint appearance with first lady Michelle Obama. What do the presidential campaigns do for candidates down ballot? And how close is the gubernatorial race? Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about the latest. 

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, host Jeff Tiberii talks with Jason deBruyn, WUNC’s data reporter, about the races in play - and the potential balance of power - in the North Carolina General Assembly (and Jason's strong sock game).

Governor Pat McCrory talks with reporters after the final gubernatorial debate on Tuesday, October 18, 2016.
Logan Ulrich / WUNC

With early voting set to begin, North Carolina residents got another side-by-side look of Governor Pat McCrory and Attorney General Roy Cooper Tuesday night. The two sparred – along with Libertarian Lon Cecil - over a range of topics in their final scheduled gubernatorial debate.

Orange County GOP Office
Credit: NC GOP

Updated 10:26 a.m., October 18, 2016


The Orange County Democratic Party says someone spray-painted its headquarters in Carrboro on the same day someone set fire to the Republican headquarters in Hillsborough. 

Steve Hammel (middle), vice president & general manager at WRAL-TV, introduces Sen. Richard Burr, R-NC, (left) and former Democratic State Representative Deborah Ross (right) at the first U.S. Senate debate held in Durham on October 13, 2016.
Kara Lynne Wiley / WUNC

North Carolina voters will help to determine the balance of power in the United States Senate next month. Republican Incumbent Richard Burr is seeking a third, which he says will be his final. Democrat Deborah Ross has provided a tougher than expected challenge.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Attorney General Roy Cooper, left, and North Carolina Republican Gov. Pat McCrory participate in a live televised debate at UNC-TV studios in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016.

With his back against the political ropes, Governor Pat McCrory was ready for a fight on Tuesday night. The Republican incumbent looked energized, confident, and threw jabs, hooks and overhand rights at his challenger, Attorney General Roy Cooper.

Roy Cooper and Pat McCrory
File photo / WUNC

Governor Pat McCrory and his challenger Roy Cooper are scheduled to meet at 7 p.m. tonight for their second of three gubernatorial debates.

Ghassan's, a quick service Mediterranean restaurant  in Greensboro.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

It's lunchtime at Ghassan's, a quick service Mediterranean restaurant  in Greensboro. Meat hits the grill,  fries drop into hot oil and ice collects in paper cups. The local restaurant chain specializes in chicken kabobs, falafel, tabouli, hummus – all the tasty Lebanese staples. One restaurant is just a block away from the Greensboro Coliseum.

Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Winding through the intense green of the Uwharrie National Forest is a country road. At a gentle curve on state Highway 109, the speed limit drops from 55 to 45 mph, cars slow down slightly and a symbol of the American South flaps in the breeze.

A pair of Republican legislators are the first to break ranks with their General Assembly colleagues on the issue of House Bill 2.

Republican state senators Tamara Barringer of Wake County and Rick Gunn of Alamance County walked back their support for HB2 this week, issuing statements that call for consideration to repeal the contentious law.

UNC Basketball, Tar Heels
Bob Leverone / AP Photo

Updated 3:55 p.m.

The NCAA Board of Governors announced Monday night that it was pulling seven championship events from North Carolina, due to the state’s HB2 law.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

Following a three year battle over ballot access, voting activists are content with where things stand a few weeks prior to the start of early voting. Last week, the State Board of Elections reached compromises on more than 30 county disputes over the scope of early voting. It is the latest moment in a long legislative and legal saga.

Sean Haugh, Libertarian candidate for U.S. Senate, 2014
Carol Jackson / WUNC

Recent political polls indicate Democrats have pulled ahead in several key races while Libertarians have reason to be optimistic heading into the general election.

The North Carolina Libertarian party needs either presidential candidate Gary Johnson or gubernatorial candidate Lon Cecil to carry at least two percent of the vote. If either does so, the Libertarians will automatically be able to place their future nominee on the ballot in 2020.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

Local elections boards are raising questions about how to restore the early voting period after a court ruling struck down North Carolina's newest elections law.

Republican Vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a town hall meeting in Raleigh, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016.

Speaking to a crowd of about 300 people at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Raleigh, Indiana Governor Mike Pence said if Republicans take back the White House in November, they will cut taxes, repeal Obamacare and put Americans back to work.

Tim Kaine in Greensboro, N.C.

At a rally in Greensboro Wednesday afternoon, Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine said voters cannot trust Donald Trump, criticized House Bill 2 and stressed the importance of this swing state in November.

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

With the Republican National Convention in Cleveland now over, the national political spotlight turns to the Democrats, who will nominate their candidate in Philadelphia next week. After that, it's onto the final three-month stretch of this ultra-marathon race. North Carolina is again a swing state and expected to be a regular part of the political terrain through November.

Phil Berger Jr.
Phil Berger for Judge Campaign

A familiar name in state politics could have a prime spot on this fall's ballot because of a proposal passed by state lawmakers.

Phil Berger Jr. is the son of Senate Pro Tem Phil Berger (R-Rockingham), one of the most powerful officials in North Carolina. The younger Berger is a former district attorney who again is seeking public office after losing a bid for the state's 6th Congressional District seat in 2014.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Lawmakers adjourned for the year early Saturday morning following a short session at the General Assembly marked with limited acrimony, plenty of debate over House Bill 2 and the departure of several long-serving members.

photo of NC Legislature
creative commons

State lawmakers completed a chaotic final day of the legislative session in Raleigh on Friday, giving final approval to a $22.34 billion dollar state budget before sending it on to the Governor.

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

A three judge panel at the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down two General Assembly redistricting measures. The ruling caught lawmakers at a chaotic time, as they’re holding closed-door meetings to consider changes to House Bill 2, while trying to adjourn for the year, prior to the July 4th weekend.

coal ash
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Republican lawmakers and Governor Pat McCrory have reached a compromise over coal ash avoiding another round in the courts.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

Editor's note: This story has been updated with the most recent action from the state Legislature.

State Senators approved a budget Tuesday night following more than an hour of review and debate.

Roy Cooper and Pat McCrory
File photo / WUNC

Incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory and his challenger Democrat Roy Cooper appeared together on stage for the first time in their heated race for the Governorship.