Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with six regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation with Mickey Michaux, a longtime civil rights activist who was first elected to the North Carolina General Assembly in 1972 as a Democrat.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a plan to repeal Obamacare fizzled in the U.S. Senate. What impact, if any, will that have on North Carolina's congressional delegation?

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a trip down memory lane with longtime North Carolina journalist Paul T. O'Connor.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, Gov. Roy Cooper's veto of legislation that would make casino nights and some raffles already run by nonprofits officially legitimate; a budget shortfall of more than $1 billion beginning in 2020; and public financing for private sports entities. Also, is the brunch bill getting too much attention in the media?

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

In July 2013, North Carolina lawmakers passed the Voter Information Verification Act – known more commonly as voter ID.  It’s a controversial law that was ultimately struck down in federal court for being unconstitutional. Nearly four years later, state legislators are now working on another voter ID bill that would be taken to voters as a constitutional amendment, according to sources.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, an overview of the first half of 2017, the heightened nature of partisan politics in North Carolina and the fighting between Governor Roy Cooper and state Legislature.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a farewell chat with Reporter Jess Clark, who departs WUNC for an education reporting position at WWNO in New Orleans.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the end of the 2017 Legislative session, which wrapped up early Friday morning after five and a half months.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

State lawmakers are heading home until August. After reaching a state budget deal, lawmakers passed a flurry of bills this week and departed early this morning. House speaker Tim Moore told reporters the legislature will be "in and out for the rest of the year," which is uncommon, but not unprecedented.

Elaine Marshall
Jim R. Bounds / AP

House Republicans have opened the door for the chamber to investigate North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall based on a lawmaker's allegations she issued notary public commissions to people who live in the U.S. illegally.

Litigation, legal, gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

Lawmakers have tabled a plan at the General Assembly to redraw judicial boundaries. The policy about-face followed a day of contentious debate and halts a measure that had initially appeared fast-tracked at the legislature, possibly destined for legal challenges.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the state budget, journalism and accusations of being a jihadist. Following spending proposals from the Governor, House, and Senate over the past few months, lawmakers passed a budget compromise this week. The $23 billion fiscal blueprint includes a $530 million tax cut, an average 3.3-percent raise for teachers, and a 1-percent pension bump for state retirees. Naturally Republicans are hailing the plan, while most Democrats contend the budget document doesn’t do enough for middle-class families and education.

House and Senate Republicans detailed parts of their compromise spending plan on Monday, June 19, 2017.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Republican state lawmakers are touting their final budget plan, which they say cuts taxes, provides teacher raises, and grows government spending by about 3 percent. Critics, including Democratic Governor Roy Cooper, say the plan fails to keep up with the growth of population and inflation.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about redistricting and gerrymandering.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

This week in state politics, a discussion about redistricting, liquor sales on Sunday mornings, and driving too slow in the left lane.

Mitch Kokai of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, join WUNC's Jeff Tiberii to discuss the week's news.

NC Lawmakers could hammer out a budget this weekend.
Photo by CafeCredit under CC 2.0

It appears those interested in a state spending bill will need to wait another day or two.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about a special session that wasn't and two bills making their way through the Legislature.

Republican lawmakers in North Carolina this week refused to hold a special session demanded by Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper to redraw General Assembly districts. Also, there's a proposed gun bill making its way through the Legislature and lawmakers are quickly advancing another bill that would overhaul the state's regulations on solar energy production.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNC  Politics Podcast, Joshua Johnson, host of NPR's 1A, sits down to talk about bubbles, echo chambers, his passion for the craft of journalism, and how he nearly became a doctor.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

Governor Roy Cooper is calling state lawmakers into a special session to redraw election maps. The unexpected announcement comes with the political boundaries having been struck down in the courts as illegal racial gerrymanders.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about the state House budget, which lawmakers passed early Friday morning. The House plan would cut taxes, fund pay increases for some teachers, and give an across-the-board $1,000 raise to state employees. It would also add $260 million  to the state's 'rainy day' fund.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the House budget with Associated Press Statehouse Reporter Gary Robertson.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Legislators in the North Carolina House are expected to approve their budget plan this evening. Under this spending proposal, teachers would receive a 3.3 percent raise, on average; retired state employees would get a modest cost of living adjustment; and taxes would be cut by an estimated $350 million.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

House Republicans are taking a turn in the budget spotlight as they detail their spending plan for the state. The $22.9 billion spending plan calls for about $350 million in tax cuts, provides teacher raises and more for state retirees. This budget is closer to the plan passed by the Republican-led state Senate, than the vision laid out by Democratic Governor Roy Cooper.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this week's episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, a conversation about the Supreme Court's decision to strike down two congressional districts in North Carolina; an analysis of state laws that end up in court; and a review of what we know about the House budget proposal.

the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Updated at 11 a.m., May 22, 2017

State lawmakers were handed their latest legal defeat Monday, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down two of the state's congressional districts because race played too large a role in their creation. Since 2011, more than a dozen Republican-backed bills have been struck down in federal and state courts.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about the "raise the age" bill, voter identification, and an audit detailing misuse of funds at the state's largest managed mental care organization.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this edition of the WUNC politics podcast, a conversation with Rose Hoban of North Carolina Heath News.

Ben and Jerry's, Voter ID
Leoneda Inge

The Supreme Court will not review North Carolina’s invalidated Voter ID Law, leaving in place a ruling by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals that had struck down the law. A lower court ruled that some provisions in the law "target African Americans with almost surgical precision," and therefore unconstitutional.

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

This week in state politics, a look at the budget.

Jeff Tiberii talks with Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of the N.C. Justice Center on the $22.9 billion spending plan passed by the North Carolina Senate.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the Senate budget with Loretta Boniti of Spectrum News.

The Senate passed a spending proposal, but not before some late-night wrangling and more than a few surprises.

The final spending bill wasn't passed until 3 a.m., well after many journalists thought.

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