Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau with Jorge Valencia and Reema Khrais. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He covered a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

After weeks of closed-door negotiations, the House and Senate have finished a $22.3 billion dollar state budget for the fiscal year beginning Friday. Legislators detailed parts of the 235-page plan during a Monday evening news conference.

Roy Cooper and Pat McCrory
File photo / WUNC

Incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory and his challenger Democrat Roy Cooper appeared together on stage for the first time in their heated race for the Governorship.

The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

A panel of federal judges heard arguments Tuesday over North Carolina’s controversial voting law at the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

Greenville Federal Courthouse
Eastern District of NC, US District Court

Eleven years ago, Mike Easley was North Carolina's governor, the Carolina Hurricanes began with what would be a Stanley Cup season and Apple had yet to unveil the original iPhone to the public. And on December 31st, 2005, North Carolina Eastern District Judge Malcolm Howard assumed senior status, a form of semi-retirement granted to U.S. federal judges.

Since then, Howard’s vacancy has yet to be filled.

Photo of Wake County Judge Mike Morgan and Incumbent Bob Edmunds
Courtesy of NC Supreme Court

A field of candidates vying for a spot on the state Supreme Court has been cut in half.

Incumbent Bob Edmunds and Wake County Judge Mike Morgan received the top two vote totals on Tuesday.

Portraint of George Holding
Courtesy of George Holding

Congressman George Holding is all but guaranteed a third term in the U.S. House of Represenatives after defeating Renee Ellmers on Tuesday in North Carolina's second primary.

U.S. House of Representatives

Voters head to the polls Tuesday for North Carolina's second primary where they will decide congressional races and a swing seat on the state Supreme Court.

One of the more competitive contests is in parts of the Triangle where two familiar elected officials are battling for one seat. It's the only race of its kind in the country - and redistricting is to thank.

A picture of a coal ash pond.
Waterkeeper Alliance

State lawmakers are again wrangling with Governor Pat McCrory over coal ash cleanup.

The House has approved a bill reconstituting the coal ash management commission. Lawmakers organized this group once before. But McCrory sued fellow Republicans saying it usurped his power.

Photo: Senate Leader Phil Berger, a Republican from Rockingham County
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

A plan introduced Wednesday at the legislature by Senate Republicans would increase average annual teacher pay, and move North Carolina to the top of compensation in the southeast. The plan is significant in size, and represents a bargaining chip in the ongoing budget negotiations between the Senate and House.

Faith leaders voiced their support of House Bill 2. The clergy also denounces comparisons between Civil Rights struggles and LGBT equality efforts.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

A group of clergy convened in front of the State Capitol Building to stand in solidarity and support House Bill 2 on Tuesday morning.

The group of about 40 pastors - both black and white from across the state - spoke for more than an hour in the foreground of a George Washington statue.

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