James Morrison

Reporter

James Morrison is a national award-winning broadcast reporter with more than seven years experience working in radio and podcasts. His work has been featured on NPR, Marketplace, Here & Now and multiple other radio outlets and podcasts. His reporting focuses on environmental and health issues, with a focus on the opioid epidemic and sustainable food systems. He was recognized with a national award for a story he reported for NPR on locally-sourced oyster farming. He also received a national award for his daily news coverage of firefighters killed in the line of duty. A podcast he produced about the fall of Saigon during the Vietnam War was accepted into the Hearsay International Audio Arts Festival.

Morrison graduated from Sacramento State University with a degree in government-journalism and began his career as a news intern at Capital Public Radio in Sacramento, California. He worked at CPR as a reporter and producer for six years before moving to Delaware Public Media to become its afternoon news anchor. He’s currently a freelance reporter in North Carolina.
 

A young pregnant mother receives a shot in her left arm to prevent pertussis in future child.
James Morrison / WUNC

A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine Friday finds that infants whose mothers get a Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis -or ‘Tdap’- vaccine during the third trimester of pregnancy are significantly less likely to get pertussis.

classroom
Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

A Raleigh mother is raising money to open a high school in Wake County designed specifically for students overcoming addiction.

Phil Berger and Time Moore stand at a podium inside the North Carolina General Assembly.
James Morrison

Leaders of the North Carolina legislature said a proposal to change the state's business incentive program is not connected to rumors of Apple opening a campus in the Triangle.

Participants make their way towards the Legislative Building during a teachers rally at the General Assembly. Thousands of teachers rallied the state capital seeking a political showdown over wages and funding for public school classrooms.
Gerry Broome / AP

Thousands of North Carolina educators mounted a historic demonstration outside the state Capitol Wednesday as lawmakers arrived for the start of a short session. While the halls in many of the state's schools were quiet, the streets of downtown Raleigh thundered with voices of teachers and their supporters.

The Silent Sam monument stands prominently on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s campus. Protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the monument on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

A law in North Carolina that was written to make moving Confederate monuments nearly impossible will soon get its first true test.

The North Carolina Historical Commission is expected to decide as soon as early June whether Gov. Roy Cooper may relocate three Confederate monuments from outside the State Capitol.

Clarence Birkhead speaking at a forum in April.
James Morrison / WUNC

Durham is getting a change in leadership in both law enforcement and criminal justice. Former Hillsborough Police Chief Clarence Birkhead beat incumbent Mike Andrews in Tuesday's Democratic primary for sheriff with 69 percent of the vote. Satana Deberry unseated incumbent district attorney Roger Echols with 48 percent of the vote.

Sheriff Mike Andrews stands and speaks to a crowd of about 30 at a forum in Durham. Opponent Clarence Birkhead looks on from his seat.
James Morrison

A legal battle over the destruction of a Confederate monument in Downtown Durham is over, but the political fallout lingers.

Durham County Sheriff Mike Andrews pressed hard for felony charges against the original nine suspects last August. And now he’s facing a tough battle in the May 8 Democratic primary race against opponent Clarence Birkhead – the candidate he beat in the 2014 race. 

 Casey Collins, Duke University Energy Manager, inspects a boiler at the West Campus Steam Plant. Soon, these boilers will run on swine biogas instead of natural gas.
James Morrison / WUNC

North Carolina isn’t rich in coal, natural gas or oil deposits, but it has more hogs than nearly any other state. And for many years, people have been trying to figure out a way to turn hog waste into electricity.

Map of the east coast showing the outer continental shelf where drilling would occur.
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is holding an open house in Raleigh Monday afternoon to solicit public feedback on a plan to open up the coast to oil and gas exploration.

Confederate Monuments, Charlottesville, Durham Monument
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The case of the Durham Eight has reached an end.

 

Durham District Attorney Roger Echols announced Tuesday afternoon he was dropping all charges against the five remaining defendants standing trial for toppling a confederate monument last August.

A silhouette of a young pregnant woman.
Sarah Zucca / flickr.com/photos/livetocreate_photography/12040481414

North Carolina is revising its policy on restraining pregnant inmates during childbirth. The current rules prohibit restraining a woman during the delivery of a child but are ambiguous about when delivery technically begins.

Two university leaders signing an agreement at a wooden table
Brian Long

The North Carolina Community College System and North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities signed an agreement Thursday that could make it cheaper and easier for nursing students to earn a bachelor’s degree.

ECU's Jay Golden with SAS' Shannon Lasaster
Photo by Rhett Butler / https://www.ecu.edu

East Carolina University is on a mission to improve health and economic prosperity in rural parts of the state, and is using big data to pursue that goal.

Fayetteville Police Department Captain Lars Paul shows a naloxone injectable kit and a naloxone nose spray Fayetteville police use to reverse opioid overdose.
Raul Rubiera / For WUNC

A national health insurer is pledging to help North Carolina fight the opioid epidemic.

The Aetna Foundation announced Tuesday it's giving $1 million dollars to the nonprofit North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition to purchase the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone. The organization will then distribute the drug in rural parts of the state.

Fayetteville Police Department Captain Lars Paul shows the naloxone nose spray the Fayetteville police use to reverse opioid overdose.
Raul Rubiera / For WUNC

The drug naloxone has become key in saving lives from opioid overdoses. It’s such a vital tool for fighting the opioid epidemic that many law enforcement officers in North Carolina now carry it with them at all times.

part of the Republican Senate bill "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" is photographed in Washington
Jon Elswick / AP

Republicans lawmakers in Congress frequently point to North Carolina as evidence their tax overhaul will be a boon for the economy. In 2013, the state passed a tax overhaul that includes a lot of the same elements as the federal proposal, including cutting corporate and income taxes.   

Mary Ankeny, Vice President of product development at Cotton Incorporated in Cary, NC.
James Morrison / For WUNC

Low cotton prices and a couple of bad weather years have unseated North Carolina as one of the leading cotton-producing states.

An Enviva wood pellet plant in Northampton, N.C.
Courtesy of Enviva

A biomass fuel plant that processes tree scraps into wood pellets has some North Carolinians concerned about its potential environmental and health impacts.