James Morrison

Reporter

James Morrison

James Morrison is a national award-winning broadcast reporter with more than seven years experience working in radio and podcasts. His work has been featured on NPR, Marketplace, Here & Now and multiple other radio outlets and podcasts. His reporting focuses on environmental and health issues, with a focus on the opioid epidemic and sustainable food systems. He was recognized with a national award for a story he reported for NPR on locally-sourced oyster farming. He also received a national award for his daily news coverage of firefighters killed in the line of duty. A podcast he produced about the fall of Saigon during the Vietnam War was accepted into the Hearsay International Audio Arts Festival.

Morrison graduated from Sacramento State University with a degree in government-journalism and began his career as a news intern at Capital Public Radio in Sacramento, California. He worked at CPR as a reporter and producer for six years before moving to Delaware Public Media to become its afternoon news anchor. He’s currently a freelance reporter in North Carolina.
 

Two university leaders signing an agreement at a wooden table
Brian Long

The North Carolina Community College System and North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities signed an agreement Thursday that could make it cheaper and easier for nursing students to earn a bachelor’s degree.

ECU's Jay Golden with SAS' Shannon Lasaster
Photo by Rhett Butler / https://www.ecu.edu

East Carolina University is on a mission to improve health and economic prosperity in rural parts of the state, and is using big data to pursue that goal.

Fayetteville Police Department Captain Lars Paul shows a naloxone injectable kit and a naloxone nose spray Fayetteville police use to reverse opioid overdose.
Raul Rubiera / For WUNC

A national health insurer is pledging to help North Carolina fight the opioid epidemic.

The Aetna Foundation announced Tuesday it's giving $1 million dollars to the nonprofit North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition to purchase the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone. The organization will then distribute the drug in rural parts of the state.

Fayetteville Police Department Captain Lars Paul shows the naloxone nose spray the Fayetteville police use to reverse opioid overdose.
Raul Rubiera / For WUNC

The drug naloxone has become key in saving lives from opioid overdoses. It’s such a vital tool for fighting the opioid epidemic that many law enforcement officers in North Carolina now carry it with them at all times.

part of the Republican Senate bill "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" is photographed in Washington
Jon Elswick / AP

Republicans lawmakers in Congress frequently point to North Carolina as evidence their tax overhaul will be a boon for the economy. In 2013, the state passed a tax overhaul that includes a lot of the same elements as the federal proposal, including cutting corporate and income taxes.   

Mary Ankeny, Vice President of product development at Cotton Incorporated in Cary, NC.
James Morrison / For WUNC

Low cotton prices and a couple of bad weather years have unseated North Carolina as one of the leading cotton-producing states.

An Enviva wood pellet plant in Northampton, N.C.
Courtesy of Enviva

A biomass fuel plant that processes tree scraps into wood pellets has some North Carolinians concerned about its potential environmental and health impacts.