Hady Mawajdeh

Producer, "The State of Things"

Hady Mawajdeh is a native Texan, born and raised in San Antonio. He listened to Fresh Air growing up and fell in love with public radio. He earned his B.A. in Mass Communication at Texas State University and specialized in electronic media. He worked at NPR affiliate stations KUT and KUTX in Austin, Texas as an intern, producer, social media coordinator, and a late-night deejay.
 
Hady joined the team at The State of Things in 2014 as a producer. Though he is new to North Carolina, he is already a fan of the Durham Bulls and the newly-reformed Charlotte Hornets. In his spare time, Hady enjoys playing pick-up basketball, reading, seeing live music, and listening to a variety of podcasts.
 

Ways To Connect

Stethoscope
jasleen_kaur / Flickr Creative Commons

Scientists have set their sights on finding a cure for AIDS. At the opening of the International AIDS Society conference in Vancouver, AIDS researchers made a call to action for a worldwide shift in HIV treatment.

They now suggest that doctors provide medication immediately after a diagnosis instead of first waiting for the signs of illness to appear.

Image of P. Murali Doraiswamy
Duke University

More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer's and new evidence that suggests women's brains are especially vulnerable to the disease.

Image of Asheville police cra
Osajus / Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of untested rape kits are sitting in police storage throughout the country according to a new investigation by USA Today.

The kits include evidence that could be matched to attackers but some law enforcement agencies say the cost is prohibitive. Here in North Carolina, hundreds of rape kits remain untested. 

Image of Pat Cohen
Music Maker Tintype, Tim Duffy and Aaron Greenhood

The Music Maker Relief Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping true pioneers and forgotten heroes of the blues gain recognition as well as meet their day-to-day needs.

The foundation teamed up with Duke Performances to commemorate their 20th anniversary with a series of summer concerts.

I, Destini

Jul 22, 2015
Image of video being shot for the documentary - I, Destini. Nicholas Pilarski and Destini Riley (left) are working on a documentary to show what it's like having a family member in prison.
Nicholas Pilarski

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics there are approximately 2.3 million people in prisons or local jails in the United States. And many of those individuals have family members living life on the outside who experience their own set of challenges.

Image of Toyota Plant in Indiana. North Carolina was in the running to be the home of Toyota's North American Headquarters in 2014, but Plano, Texas won the bid.
Kurt Weber / Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina was able to lure 47 new or expansion business projects to the state last year. The haul promises to bring more than 8,000 jobs and $1.4 billion in capital investment.

But the state recently lost the bids for a Volvo manufacturing plant and the Mercedes Benz U.S. headquarters.

So how's the state doing with economic development overall?

Image of train running in western North Carolina. When the Western North Carolina Railroad Company expanded railroad access to western North Carolina, it allowed several industries to boom.
Gerald Ledford Collection

Railroads have always been important to the economic development of North Carolina, but for many years the western part of the state was left out of the equation. The intense, mountainous terrain deterred companies from developing in the area around Asheville.

But in 1877, the state-owned Western North Carolina Railroad Company, headed by Maj. James H. Wilson, began boring through the mountains west of Old Fort. And this started a new chapter in western North Carolina history. Industries like mining, timber and tourism all began to boom.

Image of Phil Jamison leading a flatfooting workshop in Virginia in 2010.
Phil Jamison

Professor, musician and flatfoot dancer Phil Jamison has journeyed into the past to tell the story behind the square dances, step dances, reels, and other forms of dance practiced in southern Appalachia.

Image of Joe Troop on the left and Diego Sanchez on the right, who play together to form an acoustic world music sound.
Joe Troop

When North Carolina native Joe Troop first moved to Argentina, he hoped to learn about Argentine culture. The musician had an interest in the lives, beliefs and music of Argentinean people.

And as a bluegrass musician, he thought the best way to jump into the scene was to start a band. He looked online for a local who could play the banjo and he found Diego Sanchez.

  

The Hunters

Jul 16, 2015
Image of the cover of Tom Young's newest novel, 'The Hunters.'
Tom Young

Author Tom Young is back with another novel about the adventures of Colonel Michael Parson. In The Hunters (Putnam/2015), the protagonist flies relief supplies into Somalia in an antique DC-3 cargo plane for a charitable organization.

Unfortunately, things get complicated when an al-Shabaab leader declares all aid a sin against God, and he begins launching attacks against planes and convoys to stop them. 

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