Hady Mawajdeh

Producer, "The State of Things"

Hady Mawajdeh is a native Texan, born and raised in San Antonio. He listened to Fresh Air growing up and fell in love with public radio. He earned his B.A. in Mass Communication at Texas State University and specialized in electronic media. He worked at NPR affiliate stations KUT and KUTX in Austin, Texas as an intern, producer, social media coordinator, and a late-night deejay.
 
Hady joined the team at The State of Things in 2014 as a producer. Though he is new to North Carolina, he is already a fan of the Durham Bulls and the newly-reformed Charlotte Hornets. In his spare time, Hady enjoys playing pick-up basketball, reading, seeing live music, and listening to a variety of podcasts.
 

N.C. musician Ari Picker tries his hand at orchestral composition.
Duke Performances

Ari Picker is best known as the front man for the acclaimed indie rock band Lost in the Trees, but the North Carolina native is now entering orchestral composition.

Inspired by the poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, specifically Book of Hours, Picker has assembled a group of local musicians to debut his piece titled Lion and The Lamb

Pac-Man like pie chart with three counties eating the majority of JDIGs award money.
twitter.com/myncsenate

Some of the state's most powerful senators are trying to revamp the distribution of sales tax so rural areas get more of the revenue.

A measure in the Senate proposes tax revenues be distributed according to population to allow some of the money spent in big city shopping centers to return to rural areas to better build infrastructure. Opponents say the plan does not take into account the population shift due to tourism and the funds needed to maintain tourist destinations. 

The North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jmturner

State legislators have made headlines this week.

The House offered support for Governor McCrory’s economic incentives package while Senate leadership proposed their own plan. 

Legislators also offered measures to eliminate religious exemptions for student vaccinations and proposed legislation that would hinder citizens' abilities to fight large developments across the state. And a three-judge panel unanimously sided with Governor McCrory and two former governors in a lawsuit against the legislature on the appointments of three environmental commissions.

Wiliam Henry Curry joins us to talk about his life and career.
ncsymphony.org

When he was only 14 years old, William Henry Curry's music teacher handed him a small wooden baton and said, "I think you'd make a good conductor."

But Curry already knew he was born to be a conductor. In the more than four decades since, he has conducted more than 40 orchestras and some of the world's most renowned symphonies. 

  Host Frank Stasio talks with Curry about his career, facing racial challenges, the difficulties of composing orchestral music and his 19 years conducting the North Carolina Symphony. 

Kenan Memorial Stadium, where the Tar Heels have played since 1927
wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jeick

    

Former University of North Carolina football star Ryan Hoffman was once a giant. 

  The 6-foot-5-inch, 287-pound left tackle for UNC's 1997 football team helped guide the Tarheels to an 11-1 record. But Hoffman looks like a different person today. He is homeless and most likely dealing with brain trauma from his years on the football field.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with reporter Juliet Macur who tracked down Hoffman for a New York Times profile.

UNC and Duke are hosting edit-a-thons in hopes of diversifying Wikipedia's edting pool.
screenshot from wikipedia.org

Women have their fingerprints all over the history of mankind, but men have had a larger role in filling the pages of history books. 

Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology Christine Drea upclose with a hyena
Kathy Moorhouse / http://dukemagazine.duke.edu

Some of the world’s top animal behaviorists are leading a groundbreaking study of lions and hyenas for the Smithsonian Channel series Killer IQ: Lions vs. Hyena.

Hands being held.
flickr.com/photos/mabeljuillet/

How do we die?

For some death comes suddenly, and there is no time for preparation, but for others death slowly creeps up on us. Though it is inevitable, we often avoid the opportunity to prepare for it.

Cover art for Silent Lunch's most recent EP, Late to Bloom. Album art by Julienne Alexander.
Julienne Alexander

Durham’s Silent Lunch is a punk trio that plays music that they describe as “abrasive, sweet, brutal and tender.”

Their stiff upper-lip approach to music can be felt through their straight-ahead drumming, a purposeful gracelessness on guitar and lyrics delivered with a take-it-or-leave-it flair.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with Silent Lunch: Emily O’Sullivan, bassist and vocalist; Kaitie Hereford, drummer; and Hannah Spector, guitarist and vocalist about their music and they perform live. 

Supreme Court building, Washington, DC, USA. Front facade.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Daderot

The U.S Supreme Court will take up a case this week that potentially puts half a million North Carolinians at risk of losing their subsidized health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

In King v. Burwellthe high court will examine whether the federal government can assist in paying insurance premiums for all Americans or if it can only offer funds in states that have created their own health care exchanges.

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