Hady Mawajdeh

Producer, "The State of Things"

Hady Mawajdeh is a native Texan, born and raised in San Antonio. He listened to Fresh Air growing up and fell in love with public radio. He earned his B.A. in Mass Communication at Texas State University and specialized in electronic media. He worked at NPR affiliate stations KUT and KUTX in Austin, Texas as an intern, producer, social media coordinator, and a late-night deejay.
Hady joined the team at The State of Things in 2014 as a producer. Though he is new to North Carolina, he is already a fan of the Durham Bulls and the newly-reformed Charlotte Hornets. In his spare time, Hady enjoys playing pick-up basketball, reading, seeing live music, and listening to a variety of podcasts.

Ways to Connect

Concertina wire surrounding a prison
Kate Ter Harr / Flickr Creative Commons

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

A recent report by Human Rights Watch documents widespread abuse of mentally ill inmates in prisons across America. The abuses include dousing with chemical sprays, being shocked with stun guns and strapping inmates to beds for hours at a time.

NC General Assembly
Jorge Valencia

Republican leaders in the state house and senate have finally reached an agreement on at least part of the state budget.

They have made a deal that sets the budget at $21.735 billion. They still need to iron out agreements on state employee raises and funding for teaching assistants.

  Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC Capitol bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about the latest.

Pediatric oncologist Dr. Raymond Barfield has always loved storytelling. As a child he would often sit and listen to his grandfather tell tales, and in college he sought out the work of philosophers who illustrated their ideas with specific stories.

Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina education leaders are proposing dramatic changes to the state's public education system.

A group tasked with retooling the Common Core standards met yesterday to present their preliminary recommendations


Main Building of the former Black Mountain College, on the grounds of Camp Rockmont, a summer camp for boys.
Howard Morland

In the 1940's and 1950's, several professors at Black Mountain College in Western North Carolina attracted the attention of the Federal Bureau of Investigations for their progressive political beliefs.

  Increasing anti-communist paranoia fueled a federal investigation, along with suspicion about whether or not the school was inappropriately using funds from the G.I. Bill to pay for tuition.

The Bull City Dignity Project
Kari Barclay

During the summer of 2015, a group of Durham high school students have been working on a documentary theatre production based on the true life stories of Durhamites.


They met with folks from all walks of life and recorded their stories. They then reinterpreted the narratives for the stage as part of The Bull City Dignity Project.

The Epic

Aug 7, 2015
Jazz musician Kamasi Washington
Mike Park

Kamasi Washington has long been known in the world of musical performers, but he is becoming a more popular name in mainstream music in 2015.

He performed on one of the most well-known and well-received hip-hop records this year, Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp A Butterfly. The album increased attention to the intersection of jazz and hip-hop.

Bill Maher

Aug 6, 2015
Image of Bill Maher
David Becker / WireImage

Comedian Bill Maher has been setting the standard for political talk shows for more than two decades.

  It all started in 1993 with his first talk show “Politically Incorrect.” As the host, Maher specialized in biting political humor. His latest Emmy-nominated program is “Real Time with Bill Maher.”

He wrote four bestselling books, starred in one of the highest grossing documentaries of all time, and still tours regularly on the stand-up circuit.

'Hashtags are the new protest signs'
Mark Dixon / https://www.flickr.com/photos/9602574@N02/15770344667

There are all kinds of conversations happening in the multiverse that is social media.

From discussions about Ta-Nehisi Coates’ new book to police brutality, social media takes a look at a wide array of issues in the headlines.

Meet Robert Brown

Aug 3, 2015
Image of Robert Brown (second from right) meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his assistant Bernard Lee and Rev. L.V. Booth.
Robert Brown

Robert Brown is one of the most influential North Carolinians you’ve never heard of.

He had a pretty humble start in High Point, where he was born and raised. He was among the city’s first African-American police officers in the 1950s.

But he moved on quickly, first as a federal drug enforcement officer, and then as an adviser to some of the world’s most powerful people: Martin Luther King Jr., Richard Nixon, Nelson Mandela and John F. Kennedy, and that’s only part of the list.