Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

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The State of Things
11:17 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Exploring Gaps In America's Food System From The Farm To The Table

Black farmers protest at Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington, D.C. on September 22, 1997. Protesters alleged the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) denied black farmers equal access to farm loans and assistance based on their race. North Carolina farmer Timothy Pigford and 400 other black farmers filed the Pigford v. Glickman (Pigford I) class-action lawsuit against USDA in 1997. The USDA settled Pigford I in 1999.
Credit USDA photo by Anson Eaglin / flickr

A panel of experts discuss food justice

Starvation is often considered a problem distant from the American experience. But for many United States citizens, hunger is a way of life. And many of them live right here in North Carolinians.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, about 636,000 households in the state have been labeled “food insecure” within the past year. This means that over 17 percent of our families lack consistent access to nutritious food. Families hit hardest by food insecurity are Black, Latino and homes led by single mothers.

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The State of Things
12:48 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

The Klan's Rise To Prominence In 1960s North Carolina

Klansville, U.S.A. The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan by David Cunningham
Credit David Cunningham

The Klan in 1960's NC

North Carolina is widely considered one of the more progressive southern states. Acts of violence during the Civil Rights Era were rare, and the state was one of the few south of the Mason-Dixon line that went for President Barack Obama in 2008.

But during the Civil Rights Era, North Carolina had more members of the Ku Klux Klan than all other southern states combined.

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The State of Things
11:11 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Artists Explore Love As A Political Force

Tracey Emin, More Love, 2010, © Tracey Emin, Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong
Credit www.ackland.org

Artits Exploer Love as a Political Force

The exhibition "More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s" looks at love as a political force. Thirty-three pieces by 25 artists look at our need for deeper human connection in a world that has been changed by politics, technology and consumerism.  Host Frank Stasio is joined by curator Claire Schneider; and Amanda Hughes, director of external affairs at the Ackland Art Museum, to discuss the works of art.

The State of Things
11:41 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Repaying A Debt: Doctor Brings Personal Story Of Poverty To Patient Care

Dr. Leslie Smith
Credit boonesunriserotary.org

Meet Dr. Leslie Smith

When Leslie Smith was 24 years old, she was in a fire. After spending 3 months at the Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill, she was released. Smith told Host Frank Stasio “It took me about ten years to recover from those injuries.”

“I had bandages from my neck down to my thighs where my burns were, and then from my thighs down to my ankles where they had taken skin to do skin grafting operations. So I literally was covered from ankle to neck in bandages.”

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The State of Things
12:45 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Empathy's Failings And Surprises

What is this ability to step into someone else’s shoes? To imagine how they feel, to hurt for them or to be happy for them? 

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The State of Things
11:17 am
Mon February 18, 2013

A Philosopher Studies the Brains of Psychopaths

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong


Mental health is a focus of national dialogue in the wake of mass shootings around the country. What makes people kill, seemingly without remorse?

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The State of Things
10:49 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Vote Zach Galifianakis

Credit The Campaign

To prepare for his new role in “The Campaign” as a small-town conservative in a no-holds-barred congressional race, comedian Zach Galifianakis looked to the past.

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The State of Things
10:19 am
Fri February 15, 2013

The Old Ceremony

Credit www.oldceremony.com

The Old Ceremony is well-known to music lovers in the Triangle.

The band has been playing together for eight years and now their new album “Fairytales and Other Forms of Suicide” will receive an international release. Host Frank Stasio will be joined by the Old Ceremony as they talk about the evolution of their music over the years.

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The State of Things
11:51 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Remembering Chapel Hill's 1970s And 80s Feminist Children's Book Press

Members of Lollipop Power Inc, with their publications.
Credit Photo Given by Marjorie Fowler

A discussion with founding members of Lollipop Power Inc.

  When you opened up a children’s book in the 1960s, chances are you saw girls in pink playing with dolls and boys in blue going on adventures. And most of the characters were probably white.

A group of women in Chapel Hill, many of them mothers and academics, decided they wanted to see more diverse and empowering images in children’s literature and took matters into their own hands. This collective became the printing press known as Lollipop Power Inc.

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The State of Things
11:45 am
Thu February 14, 2013

The Relationship Between Faith Communities and People With Disabilities

Credit http://equual-access.blogspot.com

In 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act opened up a host of protections for people with disabilities. Amongst its gains, it banned workplace discrimination and forced government and commercial spaces to become more accessible.

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