Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Food_not_bombs_2.JPG

  

Last night leaders of local charities met to discuss options for distributing food to the poor in downtown Raleigh.

The meeting is part of a continuing negotiation between the organizations and city officials after Raleigh police stopped a group from distributing food in August.  Host Frank Stasio talks with News & Observer reporter Colin Campbell about the latest developments

Jacinta Quesada

  

When the United States Supreme Court struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act, it opened a lot of doors for gay couples. 

http://www.piedmontlaureate.com/2013piedmontlaureate/biography.html

    

John Claude Bemis is the first ever Piedmont Laureate for Children’s Literature.  In the post-Harry Potter age, more critics consider children’s books valuable works of literature with a reach that extends beyond young audiences. 

Transforming Knowledge: Public Talks on Women's Studies 1976-2011 by Jean Fox O'Barr
http://www.shewrites.com/ / She Writes Press

    

Jean Fox O'Barr was denied a teaching job at Duke University in the late 1960s. The reason? Her gender.  But later a few years later, with a shortage of professors, they asked O’Barr to join the political science department. She went on to found the Duke women's studies department and co-founded the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. 

Branford Marsalis, Arlie Petters, and Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abenyi join the State of Things for the roundtable conversation.
Laura Lee

On this week’s roundtable, a jazz great, a leading string theory mathematician and an accomplished writer share their diverse perspectives on the latest headlines. They’ll discuss a range of issues from the latest Middle East update to the challenges facing minorities in higher education. 

Jazz great Branford Marsalis joins the State of Things to speak about his work.
Palma Kolansky

Grammy-award winning artist Branford Marsalis is one of the world’s leading jazz artists. In a career spanning more than three decades, the saxophonist has collaborated with some of the biggest names in music across an array of genres. 

The four girls killed in the bombing (Clockwise from top left, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Denise McNair)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76587168@N06/ / flickr.com

  

On September 15th, 1963, the Ku Klux Klan bombed 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The explosion killed four little girls and injured 22 others. In the violent aftermath of the bombing, two little boys were murdered.

David Benbennick via wikimedia commons

  Next year, 26 new charter schools will open their doors to students in North Carolina. An additional 170 groups filed initial applications to open charter schools in 2015. The growth comes on the heels of legislature eliminating the 100 charter school cap and voting to form a new advisory board to consider charter school applications. Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC education reporter Dave Dewitt about the changes in the charter school movement and the ways the state regulates these independent institutions.

9/11 Tribute
Ekabhishek on Wikimedia commons

Today, the country pauses to remember the attacks of September 11, 2001. Marking the anniversary in a public way shapes how individuals experience grief. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Rev. Louane Frey, a chaplain who worked in the Ground Zero recovery effort and Howard Winokuer, a grief counselor and educator, about the events of 9/11 and the ways we grieve.  

Thomas Walker
U.S. Attorney's Office (Eastern District)

In the wake of a public reprimand by the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the eastern district federal prosecutors office implemented new policies and procedures. The office was scolded by the court for discovery abuse including a pattern of withholding evidence from defendants. 

Tim Okamura

The UNC Stone Center is celebrating 25 years of promoting black scholarship in the Chapel Hill community. The Center’s first exhibit of the season features the portraiture work of Brooklyn-based artist Tim Okamura. "This Story Has Not Yet Been Told…" draws from Brooklyn life, hip-hop culture, and storytelling.

In the wake of a school shooting at Carver High School in Winston-Salem, parents and students are raising concerns about school safety. The school board will discuss the matter at their meeting this evening. Also, new healthy food guidelines are causing some schools to drop out of the federal school lunch program. But Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County Schools are finding success in the new system. 

Beyond The Chinese Connection Contemporary Afro-Asian Cultural Production
http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1570 / University of Mississippi Press

    

In the 1970s, Kung Fu movies took America by storm and Bruce Lee became a household name.  Lee turned into an unexpected icon for African-American audiences, and his image especially resonated with black males.

Daniel and Lauren Goans of Lowland Hum
http://lowlandhum.com/ / Lowland Hum

    

Daniel Levi Goans is an experienced singer-songwriter with three solo albums. His wife Lauren used to sing harmony to his songs, but then they decided to become true collaborators, writing together under the band name Lowland Hum. Host Frank Stasio talks with the couple about their work and their new album Native Air.

Jim Minz
ktempest, via Flickr.com, Creative Commons

 

Today's State of Things show is a rebroadcast of an interview with Jim Minz.  The program originally aired on April 1, 2013.

Jim Minz’s childhood in small-town West Bend, Wisconsin prepared him for two things: game shows and science fiction.

Gross Ghost plays the main stage at the Hopscotch Music Festival in 2013.
Soleil Konkel

Before Mike Dillon and Tre Acklen formed the band Gross Ghost, they were friends and roommates.  They lived in a rural area on the outskirts on Raleigh and started creating music to combat boredom and cabin fever. Five years after the start of their friendship, they are releasing their second album, Public Housing.  

Wars in Syria
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95569241@N07/ / Mac Design Studio

On this week’s news roundtable, the panel shares their views on the latest headlines. They’ll discuss a broad range of international, national and local issues including American involvement in Syria, violence against women and the state of the economy in North Carolina. 

Little Green Pig's production of Our Town
littlegreenpig.com / Little Green Pig

    

Durham's Little Green Pig theatre company is performing the classic story of small town life, "Our Town.” But this show differs from traditional performances of the production because it features an all-black cast.

Sign at the U.S. Border
Makaristos via Creative Commons

Last year, Immigration and Customs Enforcement deported more than 400,000 people. But what happens when those deportees are parents? Children may end up in foster care as parents abroad struggle to regain custody. 

Culinary Historian and Judaics Scholar, Michael Twitty
http://www.stagville.org/events/ / Afroculinaria

This summer, celebrity chef Paula Deen’s use of the N-word stirred controversy. Food historian Michael Twitty wrote an open letter to Deen criticizing her appropriation and misinterpretation of African-American culinary tradition. Twitty will cook and speak about his work at Historic Stagville Plantation's Harvest Festival in Durham this Saturday, September 7th.  

NC Legislative Building
Dave DeWitt

This week, the General Assembly overrode two of Governor McCrory’s vetoes on high profile measures. One measure requires drug testing for certain welfare recipients and the other loosens restrictions for seasonal workers. Host Frank Stasio speaks with WUNC's Capitol bureau chief Jessica Jones about the response to legislature's moves. In other political news, the State Board of Elections ruled yesterday on two controversial decisions by local elections boards. Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC’s Raleigh bureau chief Dave DeWitt about the decisions. 

America's Music is a film and performance series at the North Regional Branch of Wake County Libraries.
http://www.wakegov.com/libraries/events/Pages/americasmusic.aspx

America’s Music is a film and performance series that traces the soundtrack of a nation. The program features documentary screenings and discussions about the history of 20th century American popular music from blues to Broadway and bluegrass to rock 'n' roll. 

John Tedesco
Wake County Public Schools

The past few years on the Wake County School Board have been marked by controversy. Republicans came into power in 2009 and board member John Tedesco led the charge to eliminate the school assignment program, sparking outrage and national attention.

Themonti.org
Themonti.org / Themonti.org

For the past five years, the Monti, a North Carolina storytelling organization, has brought the stories of the area to crowds around the Triangle and Triad.

tor.com
tor.com / tor.com

David Drake  has garnered a reputation in the world of science fiction readers as a leader in the military sci-fi genre. But he won’t be penned in by labels. His latest novel, “Monsters of the Earth” (Tor/2013), is the third in his Books of the Elements fantasy series.

Dr. Leslie Smith speaks on the State of Things.
boonesunriserotary.org

This episode was a rebroadcast.  The program originally aired on Monday, February 25, 2013.

When Leslie Smith was 24 years old, she was in a fire. After spending 3 months at the Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill, she was released. Smith told Host Frank Stasio “It took me about ten years to recover from those injuries.”

thehotelsmeltface.bandcamp.com
thehotelsmeltface.bandcamp.com / thehotelsmeltface.bandcamp.com

Chandler Kelley of the band The Hotels describes their music as, “a trashy, drunk version of big radio pop.”

Image of NC General Assembly where lawmakers are considering two controversial bills.
Credit NC General Assembly

The North Carolina General Assembly goes back into session Tuesday. Lawmakers will consider Governor Pat McCrory’s vetoes of two bills. One requires drug testing for certain welfare recipients. The other grants immigration exemptions for some seasonal workers.

Fast Food Strikes, NYC, July 2013
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mtumesoul/ / flickr

Across the country today, thousands of fast food workers are walking off their jobs to demand a living wage and the right to unionize. WalMart employees have also walked off the job as part of an effort to force the company to change their policies. WalMart workers will again strike nationwide next week.

Acting White? Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America
http://global.oup.com/ / Oxford University Press

During President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, some public discourse focused on the “blackness” of the President. Some on the right critiqued him for being “too black,” but some on the left claimed he was “acting white.”

“President Barack Obama, has these public moments, where he has to deal with the facts of race. He’s in this complicated situation where he has to appeal to members of multiple racial groups and have them all support him,” states Mitu Gulati, professor at Duke Law. “And then these instances occur as with Trayvon Martin, and he has both of these groups watching him so very carefully to see how Black is he or how Black isn’t he.”

Host Frank Stasio talks with Gulati and his co-author and fellow law professor Devon Carbado of UCLA School of Law. Their book, “Acting White? Rethinking Race in 'Post-Racial' America,” (Oxford University Press; 2013) addresses the question: “What does it mean to ‘act white’?”

Pages