Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Diana Matthews / Algonquin Books

Lee Smith started writing stories when she was nine years old and sold them for a nickel a piece.

Many of them were inspired by the gossip, true stories and daily grind she observed at her father's dime store, deep in the coal mining mountains of Virginia.

That is where she developed her extraordinary ability to tell a story, listening to the joy and conflict of the lives that defined Appalachia.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

The backlash against North Carolina's House Bill 2 continues.

Protesters in Chapel Hill shut down Franklin St. this week in opposition of the law that leaves LGBT people out of the state's non-discrimination policy.

Gov. Pat McCrory has taken the lead in defending the law, claiming it protects public safety.

Meanwhile, the chair of the North Carolina Republican Party, Hasan Harnett, says the rift between himself and the state party's leadership could cause chaos in the GOP primary. 

Lust And Wonder

Apr 1, 2016
Augusten Burroughs

Author Augusten Burroughs has a habit of making the private public. His memoir “Running with Scissors” (Picador/2003) traces his chaotic childhood with a mother with mental illness, and his eventual guardianship by her psychiatrist. His best-selling book “Dry” (Picador/2013) chronicled the painful outcomes of his drinking and drug use, and detailed his tumultuous journey to sobriety. Burroughs' newest book tackles an even more intimate topic: love. “Lust and Wonder” (St.

Image of Second Line Stompers
Gregg Gelb

While many types of jazz include some kind of improvisation, New Orleans-style jazz involves multiple performers improvising at the same time. It takes talent, trust, and rhythm--three things employed by the Second Line Stompers, a Triangle-based jazz group. The group performs jazz standards from the 1920s-1940s, including many made famous by Louis Armstrong. They perform at the Irregardless Café in Raleigh tomorrow and the Glenwood Club in Raleigh on Sunday.

Flag of the United States of America, backlit, windy day.
Jnn13 / Wikipedia

The divide between America's top earners and the rest of the population is wide and getting wider. 

Many experts point to the way in which the so-called "one percent" have used their economic power to tighten their grip on privilege as one reason for the widening gap.

Two of the key players are David and Charles Koch, who in 1980 started to spend millions to elect conservative libertarians to all levels of American government. 

Image of Malika Ndlovu
Malika Ndlovu

What is home? For many in Africa and its diaspora, the meaning of the word "home" has been altered, deconstructed and recreated by external forces like war, colonialism, and globalization. Narratives of home and decisions around the home have also been historically framed from the male point of view, while women bear the brunt of these decisions.

An image of 'In Abraham's Bosom' by Paul Green
Paul Green Foundation

In 1926, North Carolina playwright Paul Green helped introduce on stage realistic depictions of life for African Americans. With his Pulitzer Prize-winning play "In Abraham's Bosom," Green told the story of Abraham McCranie, a black man who wanted to educate black children in the American South.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Best friends are there for one another during hard times. They join each other on adventures and are often the first people to offer up advice or a reality-check when it’s needed.

Movies about these friendships have been around for decades and range from lighthearted films like Dumb & Dumber that trace best friends' misadventures to more tender explorations of how friendships withstand life’s up and downs, like Beaches.

Photo: Attorney General Roy Cooper
Jorge Valencia

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper will not defend the state’s controversial new law that requires transgender people to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth. He said today the mandate is unconstitutional and conflicts with some state agency policies.

From “All The President's Men” to “Spotlight,” Hollywood has followed the work of reporters and journalists throughout film history. The way the fourth estate is portrayed also often reflects other elements of culture and politics in a given era. This month's Movies on the Radio features submissions from listeners about their favorite journalism scenes on the silver screen. Host Frank Stasio talks with Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, and Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, about the best in journalism films.

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