Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Ways To Connect

A picture of a gavel on a document.
creative commons

Employees at the state Department of Health and Human Services received subpoenas in a federal investigation, according to a report by the News and Observer. 

Federal prosecutors are investigating expensive contracts for high-ranking DHHS employees and a Medicaid consulting firm. The subpoenas request information for more than 30 employees, including the employment contract for former DHHS Secretary Aldona Wos. 

Melissa Radcliff is an advocate for children with incarcerate parents as the executive director of Our Children's Place.
Melissa Radcliff

More than 2.7 million children in the United States have an incarcerated parent and more than 25,000 of those children live in North Carolina. But while conversations around mass incarceration are on the rise, the stories of these children often remain invisible. 

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie.

House Speaker John Boehner told colleagues he will resign in October. The Republican leader faced a rebellion in his own party from tea party members who say Boehner is not conservative enough.

Jo Lawry is a backup singer for Sting and was featured in the movie '20 Feet From Stardom.'
Julie Skarratt

Jo Lawry's mother and father were the kind of parents who encouraged their five children to learn to play instruments in their spare time.


Jo quickly trained herself how to play with a group, and that could be why she felt more comfortable in a supporting role when she started a career in music.


Giorgio Ciompi (right) founded the Ciompi Quartet at Duke University in 1965. Pictured with him are (L-R) Claudia Warburg, one of the early quartet members, pianist Murray Perahia and Horst Meyer, a professor at Duke and a great patron of the quartet.
Ciompi Quartet

The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University by renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. Since its inception in 1965, the quartet has been an integral part of the classical music scene in the Triangle and has also built a reputation around the world.

The quartet begins its anniversary season with a performance at Baldwin Auditorium next Saturday, October 3. The event features celebrated jazz vocalist Nneena Freelon. 

Former U.S. Congressman Barney Frank
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr Creative Commons/ USDA

Representative Barney Frank served in Congress for more than three decades.

His momentous career was marked by personal and political achievements; he was the first member of Congress to voluntarily come out as gay, he helped bring about the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, and he co-authored the far-reaching Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. 

Stock photo of a book
Horia Varlan / Flickr Creative Commons

When producer Sonja Williams began researching for the radio series, Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was, she found very little African-American radio drama from the 1940s. What little she found reinforced negative stereotypes.

A colleague eventually suggested she look into Destination Freedom, a series of weekly broadcasts created by journalist and activist Richard Durham that featured African-American leaders and heroes of the day.

NC Legislative building
NC General Assembly

A long overdue state budget is now in place. Gov. Pat McCrory signed the bill on Friday, more than six months after he released his own budget proposal.

The approval officially ended a stalemate that extended budget negotiations nearly three months beyond the fiscal year deadline. 

The governor says he got about 90 percent of what he wanted, but a few items were left on the table.

Learning To Cope With Extreme Narcissism

Sep 23, 2015
Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy for more than 30 years and has noticed an increase in narcissism in society.
Kathy Stanford

For more than 30 years, Joe Burgo has practiced psychotherapy. In that time, he noticed an increase in narcissism in society.

He sees it in the “selfies” people take or the idolization of celebrities with “me-first” attitudes.

Narcissism exists on a spectrum from the benign qualities most people show from time to time to the diagnosable Narcissistic Personality Disorder, according to Burgo.

The Forgotten Angolan Massacre

Sep 23, 2015
A shot of Luanda, the capital of Angola
David Stanley / Flickr Creative Commons

On May 27, 1977, an uprising within Angola’s ruling Marxist-Leninist party, MPLA, turned into a national massacre. Hundreds and possibly thousands of Angolans were murdered.

Lara Pawson, a former BBC correspondent in Angola, learned about the massacre and was determined to uncover the truth. She discovered how the trauma from 1977 still affects Angolans today. A nationwide chilling effect furthers the government’s goal of hiding this event.