Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Ways To Connect

Image of Phil Jamison leading a flatfooting workshop in Virginia in 2010.
Phil Jamison

Professor, musician and flatfoot dancer Phil Jamison has journeyed into the past to tell the story behind the square dances, step dances, reels, and other forms of dance practiced in southern Appalachia.

Image of Joe Troop on the left and Diego Sanchez on the right, who play together to form an acoustic world music sound.
Joe Troop

When North Carolina native Joe Troop first moved to Argentina, he hoped to learn about Argentine culture. The musician had an interest in the lives, beliefs and music of Argentinean people.

And as a bluegrass musician, he thought the best way to jump into the scene was to start a band. He looked online for a local who could play the banjo and he found Diego Sanchez.

  

Wind Energy In NC

Jul 16, 2015
Wind turbines
Martin Pettitt / Flickr Creative Commons

A stretch of land that was once called “The Desert” by locals is now the site of a potential new economy in North Carolina: wind energy.

And the market for the energy produced by the wind farms already has a buyer: Amazon. Meanwhile, the legislature continues to debate environmental deregulation measures.

Raleigh Little Theatre

In the last decade, there has been a surge of new work from African-American artists in the Triangle.

But they are still grappling with a limited number of platforms, especially in the performing arts. The amount of talent is booming, but the number of roles for African-Americans is not keeping up.

Now, a group of black artists in the Triangle is trying to bridge that gap through a forum that brings artists together with local entrepreneurs and art lovers who are craving new modes of expression.

The Hunters

Jul 16, 2015
Image of the cover of Tom Young's newest novel, 'The Hunters.'
Tom Young

Author Tom Young is back with another novel about the adventures of Colonel Michael Parson. In The Hunters (Putnam/2015), the protagonist flies relief supplies into Somalia in an antique DC-3 cargo plane for a charitable organization.

Unfortunately, things get complicated when an al-Shabaab leader declares all aid a sin against God, and he begins launching attacks against planes and convoys to stop them. 

Image from a drone hovering in the air
NGAT at NC State

North Carolina is taking small steps toward opening up the skies for unmanned aerial vehicles.

The Department of Transportation has created a position to regulate the skies for recreation and commercial drone pilots and the state is creating new test that ensures pilots know the rules before they launch their planes into the skies.

Image of a drone being launched. The U.S. Navy launches an aeriel drone during a weapons firing exercise off the coast of Brazil in 2011.
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Stuart Phillips / Flickr Creative Commons

Have you ever wondered why seemingly successful wars never seem to end?

Author and intelligence expert William M. Arkin tries to answer the question of unending wars in his new book Unmanned: Drones, Data, and the Illusion of Perfect Warfare (Little, Brown and Company/ 2015). Arkin argues the digital revolution’s creation of drones and a reluctance to put boots on the ground yields seemingly endless warfare.

Image of Jacqueline Woodson, who is an award-winning author, used her life experiences growing up in South Carolina as the basis for her memoir, 'Brown Girl Dreaming.'
Marty Umans

Award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson grew up Greenville, S.C. during the '60s and ‘70s. During this period of her life, Woodson was very aware of the segregation in her community and throughout the South.

Voting sign
kristinausk / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal trial is underway in a case challenging North Carolina's elections law. Opponents say provisions limiting early voting amount to voter suppression that especially affects African-Americans. 

Supporters say the measure prevents fraud. The decision from Judge Thomas D. Schroeder could have big implications for voting laws across the country.

Host Frank Stasio talks with WFAE reporter Michael Tomsic about the latest.

NC General Assembly
Jorge Valencia

Members of the General Assembly are back in Raleigh after a week-long vacation. They still must pass a budget for the next two years and consider several other bills, including Medicaid reform and Gov. Pat McCrory's bond proposal.

And Greensboro challenges the legislature’s measure changing voting districts for the city council. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol reporter Jorge Valencia about the legislature's agenda for the rest of the summer.

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