Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston is NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent and has been reporting from all over the world for the network's news magazines since 2007.

She recently completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to NPR, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to the New Yorker, WNYC's Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

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NPR has new details on what investigators are discovering about Pentagon analysis of the battle against ISIS in Iraq.

The Pentagon is looking at whether senior military officials at U.S. Central Command, or CENTCOM, pressured intelligence analysts into painting a rosy picture of the fight against ISIS. The Defense Department's inspector general is talking to a group of intelligence analysts who are providing evidence and details on how bias crept into their assessments.

The American Psychological Association voted Friday in favor of a resolution that would bar its members from participating in national security interrogations.

The resolution by the country's largest professional organization of psychologists passed overwhelmingly. The only dissenting vote came from Col. Larry James, a former Army intelligence psychologist at Guantanamo.

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The family of Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez has been holed up with friends since the 24-year-old went on a shooting rampage in Chattanooga, Tenn., that ultimately left four Marines and a sailor dead.

A representative of the family, who would speak only on condition of anonymity, said since Thursday's shooting, Abdulazeez's family has received numerous death threats.

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FBI Director James Comey told senators on Wednesday that increased encryption on mobile devices is complicating the FBI's job.

Comey, along with a roster of Obama administration officials, has been asking Silicon Valley companies for months for a solution that would allow law enforcement to monitor communications with a court order, while protecting the privacy of consumers. Technology companies like Apple and Google have resisted their entreaties, setting off a tense debate over encrypted data and a user's right to own their own information.

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There's been a setback for a Minnesota man who had been a test case for deradicalization in this country.

U.S. authorities have arrested a third New York man in connection with an alleged plot to detonate pressure cooker bombs in New York City for the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS.

The latest arrest involved a 21-year-old Staten Island man named Fareed Mumuni who allegedly tried to kill a law enforcement official who came to his house earlier today. The criminal complaint alleged that he repeatedly attempted "to stab an FBI Special Agent with a large kitchen knife."

U.S. authorities arrested a 20-year-old Queens man over the weekend suspected of plotting to detonate a pressure cooker bomb in New York to show his devotion to the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS.

More than two years after the self-proclaimed Islamic State burst on the scene, it is still difficult to quantify just how big the threat is in this country. Counterterrorism officials say nearly 200 Americans have traveled to Syria and Iraq, are thinking about doing so or have returned to the U.S. after spending time there.

NPR has learned that number of returnees in this country is nearly three dozen — but their cases remain sealed.

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

In Arabic, haqq is the word for truth.

Last week in the United Arab Emirates, group of Muslim scholars held what they called a "haqqathon" – a hackathon meant to create new ways for Islamic scholars to connect with young Muslims and, by doing so, defuse violent extremists like the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

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