Carol Jackson

Digital News Editor

Carol Jackson has been with WUNC since 2006. As Digital News Editor, she writes stories for wunc.org, and helps reporters and hosts make digital versions of their radio stories. She is also responsible for sharing stories on social media. Previously, Carol spent eight years with WUNC's nationally syndicated show The Story with Dick Gordon, serving as Managing Editor and Interim Senior Producer.

During her career in media, she has won a number of awards for producing innovative media projects, including numerous EMMY citations and a WEBBY (commonly called The Oscars of the Internet). Previously, Carol served as Director of Educational Production for Maryland Public Television. She grew up in Epsom, NH and attended Emerson College in Boston.  Carol and her family are happy to be in North Carolina – near to her husband's extended family in Smithfield and Apex.

Ways to Connect

Durham Bulls stadium
Frank Hunter

Last year more than a dozen creative types - writers, photographers and filmmakers descended on the Durham Bulls Athletic Park for an unprecedented in-depth look at minor league baseball. Someone was at the stadium for every inning -- of every game -- all summer long. All of the work of Bull City Summer has been reviewed and now the very best is on display at several area locations.

WUNC's Carol Jackson has the story:

Lili Morales, Teen Journalist and rising senior at Northern High School
'selfie'

As in summers past, WUNC staff members are mentoring six teenage reporters. The young people come from  three different counties, and get to see the inner workings of a public radio member station for several weeks while developing their own stories. Seasoned reporters are teaching them the tricks of the trade.

At the end of their first week on the job, we asked the students to submit a 'selfie' and tell us one thing that surprised them about the station.

"I am surprised that a radio station is so quiet and big," Lili Morales said.

This is an example of the style of graphic in the textbook
E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation

Attention teachers and lifelong learners: noted naturalist and biologist Dr. Edward O. Wilson has a new product out that just might make you swoon. It's a gorgeous high-tech interactive textbook series with full-color photos, 3D animations and interviews with working scientists. It's aligned with educational standards and it's free.

Teen Reporters: 8 Essential Summer Jams

Jun 26, 2014
earbuds and a heart
Olivia Alcock / Flickr/Creative Commons

WUNC is working with several teen reporters this summer. The young people are learning Journalism 101 from seasoned NPR and WUNC reporters.

On their first day on the job, we asked each reporter to recommend a song. The idea is to pull together a fun 2014 summer playlist for you.

Here are the recommendations.

Jamayah Parrish: "Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People:

Paul McCartney
The artist

Jonesing for tickets to Paul McCartney's 'The Out There' tour? He's just announced that he's headed to the Tar Heel state.  The tour will stop at the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, North Carolina October 30.

The legendary rocker has been ill with a viral infection, but he released a video message today saying that he's feeling better and he's ready to rock. He even plays a (slightly awkward) air guitar.

Mike Oniffrey

Randy Lewis almost lost the family dairy farm in 2009. The price of milk had bottomed out, and costs for feed, fertilizer and fuel had gone sky-high.

"It was either find some other way to make money or sell the cows and quit," he says.

But Randy had an idea that might just save the farm. He's bottling milk right on-site. Of the 150 dairy farmers in the state, only five bottle their own milk. And Randy's figured out how to do it without shelling out a lot of money.

Watch the story here:

(l-r) Emmanuel Johnson, Thar Thwai, Chelsea Korynta, Jamayah Parrish, Morgan Manson, Lilli Morales
Carol Jackson

Where do you find those stories? That is one of the most-asked question of a radio reporter. Six young people will find out the answer this summer in WUNC's 3rd annual Summer Youth Radio Institute. The Institute kicked off Monday June 23 with an ambitious goal: teach the teens to find stories in their communities and give them the tools to tell those stories on the radio.

More than 50 young people applied to be a part of the experience. The rookie reporters hired for the six positions come from Orange, Durham and Chatham counties.

Willie McRae (right) with reporter Dick Gordon.
Carol Jackson

Pinehurst No. 2 is one of the most revered courses in the land. It was designed by Donald Ross, who called it “the fairest test of championship golf I have ever designed.” That course is the site of this week's U.S. Open.

Willie McRae knows the place about as intimately as anyone. Willie is the longest-serving caddy at the resort. He started working there when he was 10 years old, May 19, 1943. He's caddied for "the average Joe" and the world's elite.

And he has a lot of stories to tell.

Sim Bowden has worked this corner in Chapel Hill since 1999.
Carol Jackson

Every weekday, Sim Bowden manages the pedestrians at the intersection outside of Estes Hills Elementary in Chapel Hill. He's there for an hour and fifteen minutes each morning and afternoon, shepherding kids and adults safely across the busy street. Watching him is mesmerizing. His hand is usually in the air -- he waves to everyone, cars, trucks, school buses. And everyone seems to know Sim.

"Hello, cutie," shouts a mom in a silver SUV.

Today is the last day of school in Chapel Hill, and it also marks the end of Sim's fifteenth year working this corner.

Senate Leader Phil Berger takes an impromptu meeting with Moral Monday protesters.
Reema Khrais

Monday night, 15 Moral Monday protesters sat in front of Senate Leader Phil Berger’s door.  Berger wasn't in his office, so the protesters sat there until the Senate session ended. Soon, State Capitol Police began to usher everyone out. They said that the building was closing, everyone had to leave. Reporter Dave DeWitt was with the protesters. He wrote about what happened next this way:

black bear
Casey Brown / Flickr/Creative Commons

Early Monday, officials were tracking a bear in the Five Points area of Raleigh. WRAL reported that information about the bear began to come in after midnight.

A mailman working in the area told WRAL News that a couple reported seeing the bear near a home under construction at the corner of Carroll and Whitaker Mill Road.

 

The PowerUp 3.0
PowerUp Toys

A Durham man is among the first in the country to test a new type of drone that can be made out folded paper. The device has a plastic propeller, an attached rudder, and is directed by an iPhone app.

The drone is called the PowerUp 3.0. It was created by Shai Goitein, a former Israeli Air Force pilot.

Goitein took his engineering idea to the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter last fall. He asked for $50,000 and received $1.2 million dollars.

Here's the original concept:

Loggerhead sea turtle
Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, Topsail Island

In the fall of 2012 a severely injured loggerhead sea turtle was rescued off the coast of North Carolina.

The loggerhead was brought to the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in Topsail Island, and then was transported to North Carolina State University School of Veterinary Medicine where a team worked on her injuries. The team named the turtle Nichols and began to figure out the extent of the damage.

KKK Parade and Rally Chapel Hill, NC June 15, 1987
Michael Galinsky

The pictures capture a day that many in Chapel Hill, NC would like to forget. White-hooded figures marching carefree down Franklin Street. It was the day the KKK came to town: June 15, 1987.

About 60 people took part in the march and membership rally. The event started in Durham and then progressed to Chapel Hill. Two thousand people lined the parade route; some to support the participants, others to heckle them. 

Brandon Jeffries (left) and Erik Fugunt
Jacqueline Dunkle

One of our most viewed digital stories this year was titled, "Paraplegic Man Saves Another Man's Life; You Can Help Say Thanks." The story was a dramatic one that took place in Mebane, NC. Here's the original story. Don't miss the update at the end of the post.

Our original story 4/15/2014

Jordan and Jamekah are two young people on the ride.
Remember the Removal Bike Ride

Cyclists from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians have joined a dozen members of the Cherokee Nation from Oklahoma. The group will ride their bicycles 950 miles over three weeks, tracing the route of the Trail of Tears.

In 1838 and 1839, the Cherokee Nation was required to give up all lands east of the Mississippi River. The requirement was a part of President Andrew Jackson's plans to remove the Indians. 

More than 15,000 Cherokees were forced to march from their homeland across nine states to Oklahoma. The journey came to be known as the "Trail of Tears."

Chatham County Line
Michael Podrid / Yep Roc Records

“There’s a lot of growing up in this record,” says vocalist/guitarist Dave Wilson.

“We’re maturing in this world and seeing things through a different set of eyes – and that materializes in a lot of these songs.”

Chatham County Line is celebrating the release of their latest album, Tightrope from Yep Roc Records. The foursome stopped into the WUNC  studios to talk with Eric Hodge.

The interview begins with this song: Any Port in a Storm.

Zachary De Pue, concertmaster for the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and member, Time for Three
Still from YouTube video

Two classical musicians tried to board a US Airways flight on Memorial Day. They were told that they were welcome, but their violins were not.

Nicolas Kendall and Zachary De Pue are frequent flyers. They perform as part of the group Time for Three (Tf3.)  In recent weeks the trio has performed in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Indianapolis. They've always been able to bring their violins with them, in the cabin of the plane.

Bettie Lehem Closs
Scripps National Spelling Bee

I lost on the word "laundromat." It bothers me to this day. I was competing in the Epsom Central School (NH) annual spelling bee. It was intense. I remember leaning back, my head propped on the edge of the headrest between words, silently mouthing prayers aimed at the ceiling. For some reason, I hadn't practiced from the list of provided words, but I read a lot, so I thought I had a good chance.

It was getting towards the end of the bee, and the teacher read out my word. "Laundromat." She said it twice, her diction precise.

A member of the Pop Warner football league, the Durham Eagles (NC)
Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University

How much money does your family spend on sports? Do you spend hundreds each your on a traveling team for a middle schooler? Perhaps your child plays in more than one of these competitive leagues. How about a private conditioning coach? How much is too much?

There's an intriguing new project about the topic. It's called Contested, and it features families in Durham, NC.

>>Browse the multimedia site.

Cape Hatteras Fishing Pier, August 4, 2013
Alistair Nicol / Flickr/Creative Commons

Cape Hatteras has been ranked as the sixth best beach in the nation by a leading beach expert, Dr. Stephen Leatherman ("Dr. Beach") of Florida International University.

Here's the list:

Carol Jackson

Last fall, we brought you the story of twin sisters, Bernice Wade and Barbara Stiles. The two live in an historic house in Chapel Hill. The sisters are well known in the community for the beauty of their gardens.

Each fall, their friends and neighbors -- including many children -- gather to help them plant 1,000+ bulbs. This "planting party" is special to the community. The sisters recently had another party, one to celebrate the blooms.

Pottery by Sid Luck
Sid Luck

There's a potter in North Carolina who can trace his roots by the generations of family members who've spun clay.

Sid Luck's great-great-grandfather, William Henry Luck, began turning pots in Seagrove just after the Civil War. This week, five generations later, Sid Luck was awarded a North Carolina Heritage Award from the NC Arts Council for his work as a potter.

Bill Myers, 2014
NC Arts Council

Bill Myers was honored this week with a North Carolina Heritage Award. Myers is a saxophone player, and he's led the jazz band The Monitors for close to 60 years.

Bill's earliest introduction to music was when the minstrel shows came through Eastern North Carolina in the 1940s.

Mad Men Mondays: Episode 6, “The Strategy”

May 19, 2014

In partnership with Duke University's Hartman Center, we continue the Mad Men Mondays series with images from the University's advertising archive that relate to Sunday night's episode.

Last night’s episode featured references to loafers, Buick, Barbie, Fondue pots, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

Episode Synopsis

Mad Men Mondays: Xerox, Golf Clubs And Runaways

May 12, 2014

Episode 5 from the final season of AMC's "Mad Men" has aired and as we have done over the last several Mondays, in partnership with Duke University's Hartman Center For Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, we present the next in the "Mad Men Mondays" series.

Keith Ivey / Flickr/Creative Commons

North Carolina voters are choosing their candidates for a competitive U.S. Senate seat, the state Supreme Court and dozens of other state and federal offices.  Local election workers planned to open more than 2,700 precinct locations today.

Eight Republicans are seeking their party's nomination to challenge Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan. She has her own primary against two lesser-known opponents.

Supreme Court Associate Justice Robin Hudson has two challengers for her seat. The top two vote-getters advance to the November election. 

Chef Ashley Christensen won the James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Southeast. The news was announced Monday.

To Christensen, a restaurant is not just a place where you sit down to eat.  It’s an entire concept.  She carefully plots an immersive experience for her diners.

Hurricane Hazel uprooted over 100 trees on campus, tore the roof off the press box at the stadium, destroyed homecoming displays, and damaged stone work on the Chapel. Campus clean-up was greatly aided by a campaign created by the women of East Campus (th
Duke University Archives / Flickr/Creative Commons

Sixty years ago, Connie Ledgett and her first husband, Jerry Helms, were honeymooning on Oak Island near Wilmington. They had no idea that 140 mile-per-hour winds and an 18-foot storm surge were headed in their direction. That storm was Hurricane Hazel and it would be the strongest category 4 hurricane ever seen in the state. It devastated a 35-mile stretch of the coast.

The helicopter is a 12-passenger, 1998 Sikorsky S-76
Office of Governor McCrory

It seats 12. It costs $5200 an hour to operate. It can be yours if the price is right.

Governor Pat McCrory tweeted Friday that he plans to sell the state's helicopter.

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