Anita Rao

Managing Editor, "The State of Things"

Anita Rao is the Managing Editor for The State of Things, WUNC's daily, live talk show that features the issues, personalities and places of North Carolina. 

She fell in love with interviewing and storytelling as a Women's Studies and International Studies major at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and began her radio career at WUNC as an intern for the nationally distributed public radio program The Story. From 2011 - 2014, she worked for the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps Production department, where she pitched, edited and produced conversations from across the nation--from Chicago, IL to Pineville, North Carolina.  

Anita was born in a small coal-mining town in Northeast England but spent most of her life growing up in Iowa and has a fond affection for the Midwest. In her spare time she also co-hosts and produces a podcast and radio show about millennial feminism called "She and Her." 

Ways to Connect

Image of Student Protesters
Jeff Tiberii

    

Members of the University of North Carolina system’s Board of Governors heard presentations Wednesday and Thursday from centers and institutes across the system as they consider possible cuts. 

Image of H.L. Mencken
Flickr/Union-Square

 

H.L. Mencken was a columnist, author and journalist regarded as one of the most influential American writers from the early 20th century.

Image of William Shakespeare.
Flickr/Books18

This year marks the 450th birthday of William Shakespeare, and worldwide celebrations earlier this year indicated that his life and work continue to transcend racial, ethnic and geographic boundaries. 

As a young classical music producer in the 1980s, Michael Haas was digging through East German archives researching the works of Kurt Weill.

Image of c.
JAG Entertainment

Grammy nominated jazz vocalist Nnenna Freelon and bassist John Brown bring their big band Christmas tunes back to the stage at Durham’s Carolina Theatre this Sunday, December 7.

    

When Sharon Ewell Foster first published her novel Passing by Samaria in the late 1990s, it was a time of relative racial peace throughout the United States.

Image of GlaxoSmithKline headquarters in west London.
Flickr/Ian Wilson

    

Pharmaceutical player GlaxoSmithKline is laying off hundreds of workers in its American facilities, and the bulk of these job cuts are in Research Triangle Park.

Jon Gardiner for PlayMakers Repertory Company

The musical Into the Woods begins like many classic fairy tales with the line “Once Upon A Time…” 

Image of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and other psychologists.
Flickr/ David Webb

  

Fairy tales have been around in various forms for hundreds and likely thousands of years, and many scholars argue that they’ve stood the test of time because they speak to many of our most deep-seated beliefs and struggles. 

A new memoir by UNC's Kenan Visiting Writer Daisy Hernández
A Cup of Water Under My Bed Book Cover

This was originally broadcasted on 10/21/2014

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father. 

Her family hoped that she’d “become white,” but she struggled to meet their demands while forming an identity of her own. Her new memoir, A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press/2014), traces her journey, weaving stories of religion and family with details about a new world away from home, where she developed a new political consciousness, came out as bisexual, and worked as a feminist journalist. 

The Turkey Man

Nov 26, 2014
Photo of Mike Davis is a turkey hunter turned turkey enthusiast who owns more than 700 turkey-themed items.
StarNews Online

Across the country on Thursday, Americans will consume the quintessential Thanksgiving food: turkey. 

Image of Sarah Hale, editor of Godey's Lady Book
Wikimedia Commons

    

Many people sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner may hearken back to some version of a story about Pilgrims and Native Americans feasting together. 

peoplesworld / Flickr Creative Commons

A grand jury in St. Louis has decided not to indict Darren Wilson, the white Ferguson police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown, an unarmed black man.

In Ferguson, the decision sparked outrage, with several instances of arson and looting overnight. Police have arrested at least 61 people.

In other parts of the country, the decision was met with mixed response and reflection about how race plays into the criminal justice system.

Image of Amanda Holliday with her grandmother Celeste Sawyer.
Amanda Holliday

Many kids grow up spending time after school with other kids in their neighborhood playing pick-up soccer, videogames or capture the flag. 

Emily Musolino of the Emily Musolino Band at Motorco in Durham.
Emily Musolino Music

  

When Durham native Emily Musolino left for the Berklee College of Music, the only thing she knew she wanted to do with her life was to make music. 

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

  

The International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro was built to commemorate a transformative moment in civil rights history when four NC A&T freshmen staged a sit-in at the city's whites-only lunch counter. 

Image of three growingchange.org participants harvesting food.
Noran Sanford

Cody Oxendine grew up in a small town in North Carolina dominated by gangs. He joined a gang at a young age and his activities landed him in juvenile court for two counts of simple assault. Three years ago, he was on probation and doing everything in his power to avoid prison. Now, 18-year-old Cody is thrilled to spend a lot of his time at one particular prison.

Oxendine is part of a group of youth leading an effort to flip an abandoned prison in Wagram, North Carolina into a sustainable farm.

Photo of low and lower bass/cello duo.
Low and Lower

Bassist Paul Sharpe and Cellist Brooks Whitehouse are a bestselling cello-bass duo who developed a new genre of music that puts string instruments in a new context. 

Tommy Lee Edwards

Comicons, or conventions of comic fans, are best known for throngs of costume-clad attendees and access to the industry’s best comics creators. 

    

Writer Charlie Lovett has been attracted to the mystique of old books since he was a young kid. 

Raleigh Little Theatre

In popular culture, the term cakewalk means anything that is effortless and easy.

Briana Brough

As the demand for local food and farm-to-table restaurants rises, the American agriculture and food production industries are expanding. 

  

Much of what we know about autism is publicly disputed, from the definition of autism itself to the reasons behind the increase in diagnoses. 

Image of Pisgah National Forest
Flickr/Jeff Gun

    

The Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests in western North Carolina play an integral role in the state’s environment and economy. 

Image of Duke Professor Missy Cummings, drone advocate and expert.
Missy Cummings

  

Although the word drone may at first evoke an image of a stealth killing machine, the work of Mary 'Missy' Cummings proves drones are much more than that initial thought. 

When Paul Austin and his wife Sally were anticipating their first child, they both felt excited and ready to be parents.

Graphic for The Murphey School Radio Show
The Murphey School Radio Show

The Murphey School Radio Show takes place at the formerly abandoned but now renovated 1920s-era Murphey School in Orange County. The School serves as a community performance space and an incubator for small nonprofits. The semiannual show features skits, jingles, and musical acts to bring the community together to benefit local non-profits Student U and EmPOWERment, Inc. 

Thom Tillis and Kay Hagan
NC General Assembly/US Senate

    

As the midterm elections get closer, education is a prominent topic in North Carolina’s congressional races. 

Cover of the book A Cup of Water Under My Bed
Cover Image of the book A Cup of Water Under My Bed

  

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father. 

Image of Seema Kukreja as Udip, Robin Carmon Marshall as Anaba and Alexus Wilcox as Corrine in the play "From the Boot of Timberland".
Eric Barstow

A new family-run black theater company in the Triangle is presenting two companion one-act plays that encourage men and women to come together to address violence against women. 

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