Amber Nimocks

Producer, "The State of Things"

Amber Nimocks came to The State of Things in January 2009. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a survivor of 15 years in the newspaper business. As a reporter and editor, her posts have included such exotic locales as her hometown of Fayetteville, Robeson County, Wilmington, Raleigh and Fort Worth, Texas.

In her spare time she drinks wine and writes about it for The News & Observer, eats and writes about it for Edible Piedmont, and travels and writes about it for anyone who’s interested. She lives with her husband, her son and two dogs in downtown Raleigh.

Ways to Connect

http://www.bizjournals.com/triad/

There's reason to be optimistic about the economy in the Triad region of North Carolina. While traditional manufacturing jobs in textiles and furniture have mostly dried up, better paying jobs in biotech, shipping and many other fields are emerging. Justin Catanoso, executive editor of the Triad Business Journal, talks with host Frank Stasio at Greensboro’s Triad Stage about the state of the economy.

www.ignatsolzhenitsyn.com

World-renowned pianist and conductor Ignat Solzhenitsyn is no stranger to fame. His father was the legendary Soviet author and dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Ignat Solzhetnitsyn serves as Principal Guest Conductor of the Moscow Symphony Orchestra, and he has led and performed with symphonies in cities across the United States and Europe. He is in North Carolina to perform with the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.

www.ifnotforyou.org

A group of local musicians will get together on Saturday night at the Cat's Cradle to celebrate the 40th anniversary of George Harrison's landmark solo album. The event is the brainchild of Toby Roan, a Triangle man who found solace and inspiration in listening to "All Things Must Pass" while his mother was battling cancer.

History has been shaped as much by the conversations and bargains that ended or avoided war as by war itself. In his new book, "Great Negotiations: Agreements that Changed the Modern World” (Westholme Publishing, 2010), author Fredrik Stanton tells the stories of eight feats of diplomacy. The book begins with Benjamin Franklin bluffing his way to the Franco-American Alliance in 1778 and ends with the faltering but fruitful summit between U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in Reykjavik.

In their slim but fascinating novel, "Donald" (McSweeney's, 2011), Durham writer Eric Martin and his co-author Stephen Elliott explore the provocative question: What if former U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld were abducted from his home without warning and imprisoned without being told why? How would the man who oversaw the creation of prisons such as those at Guantanamo Bay and Bagram react if he were looking from the inside out?

The 1920s-era Murphey School in Orange County sat abandoned for years until Jay Miller, a philanthropist with a soft spot for historic properties, bought it and restored it. Now the school serves as an incubator space for small nonprofits associated with Miller’sShared Visions Project, while the auditorium serves as a community performance space. On Saturday night, Triangle area musicians and writers will gather to perform an old-time radio variety show in the school’s auditorium to raise money for local organizations. Among those participating will be accordion player Jay Cartwright.

Chris Hondros - http://www.bagnewsnotes.com

Last week's toppling of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak has drawn the attentions of the world to the unrest in the Middle East. As we wonder what will happen in the wake of the 30-year Mubarak regime, host Frank Stasio talks with experts, expatriates and observers about the possibilities.

Jimmy Williams

The works of printmaker Chris Williams and photographerJimmy Williams offer two disparate examples of how music permeates visual art. Both artists are featured in a new exhibit called "Listenings," sponsored by the City of Raleigh Arts Commission. Host Frank Stasio talks with Jimmy Williams about how photographing blues musicians helps him see the world in a different way, and with Chris Williams about how the posters he creates for rock bands and events help reach listeners via their eyes.

Jeannette Walls
http://blogs.guilford.edu/bryanseries/

Jeannette Walls' parents didn't seem to worry about her and her three siblings much. Not when Jeannette set herself on fire cooking a hot dog when she was a preschooler, not when the family had to repeatedly flee home after home with creditors at their heels, not when she rummaged through the school garbage to find her lunch. But in her best-selling memoir, "The Glass Castle" (Scribner/2005), Walls offers gratitude for the lessons she learned growing up and for her parents' gifts of love. The author joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her memories of a hard-knock childhood.

Taste Of Place

Jun 23, 2010

Certain places are known for their indigenous foods. Vidalia, Ga. grows sweet onions. The banks of the Indian River in Florida produce outstanding citrus fruits. In some cases, governments go as far as to designate these special places with geographical indications. But what makes some geographical indications associated with certain foods and drink profitable for the farmers and producers in that area? N.C.

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