Science & Technology

Science & Technology
10:41 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Federal Regulators Have Open House To Discuss Nuclear Power Plant In Holly Springs

The Shearon Harris nuclear power plant
Credit Nuclear Regulatory Commission / nrc.gov

Officials with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will hold an open house and presentation in Holly Springs Monday evening. Federal officials will review the performance of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Plant. The facility is about 20 miles southwest of Raleigh and operated by Duke Energy.  Part of the plant was determined to have a small crack in a nuclear reactor. Duke corrected that issue without any significant incident.  

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The State of Things
11:57 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Your Love Affair With Your Smartphone

This diptych is based on the smudge patterns left behind on glass smartphone screens, which form interesting compositions even thought they are just artifacts of use. By artist parasolb/Kerry Crocker.
Kerry Crocker

Many people tote smartphones around all day. But what is the nature of the relationship to smartphones and how do they change the perception of reality?

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Science & Technology
9:53 am
Mon April 28, 2014

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Reach Elite 8, National Academic Competition

The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics team participates in the academic competition of the 2014 National Science Bowl, Sunday, April, 27, 2014, in Washington, DC.
Credit Dennis Brack / U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science

A team from Durham's North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics joined 23 other schools over the weekend to compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C.  During the competition, students compete in a fast-paced Jeopardy-like forum. They must quickly solve technical problems and answer questions related to science and mathematics.

Team members include Michael An, Anne Feng, Kavi Jain, Sammy Luo, and Daniel Ren.  Their coach is Leslie Brinson.

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The State Of Things
12:46 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Scientists And Artists Explore The Sounds Of Outer Space

Ed White on the first United States Spacewalk
Credit flickr.com / Review of U.S. Human Space Flight Plans Committee

Scientists say in space you cannot hear a sound. But for decades, filmmakers have tried to create the sounds of space. And perhaps they’re onto something. Asheville's Moogfest is hosting a panel "Sounds of Space," that explores both artists and scientists' perspectives on what we can hear in space if we learn to listen. Charles Lindsay, a multimedia artist and the artist in residence at SETI (Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute, and Eric McDougall, founder and principal of Black Ink San Francisco, are part of the panel. 

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Science & Technology
7:32 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Research Shows The Civil War, Trail Of Tears Impacted Cherokees’ Physical Development

A study from NC State University shows that traumatic experiences, like the Civil War and the Trail of Tears, had an impact on the way Cherokee skulls developed at the time.
Credit NCSU

New research from North Carolina State University has found a connection between historical stressors and physiological development in the Cherokee nation. 

In the late 19th century, anthropologist Franz Boas measured the skulls of adult Cherokees from groups who had grown up as the nation was split. Some were driven west on the Trail of Tears, and others fled to the Smoky Mountains for safety. 

NC State Forensic Anthropologist Ann Ross analyzed that data and found that Cherokees from both groups developed smaller skulls with different shapes.  

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The State Of Things
12:56 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Beers Of North Carolina

Beer sampler
Credit Flickr: Quinn Dombrowski

Since 1980, North Carolina's beer industry has grown from four breweries to nearly 100. The craft beer explosion has far-reaching effects in the local economy, community and agriculture. It has inspired a great deal of creativity, including the development of beer made from yeast that grows on wasps.

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The State of Things
12:16 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Science Is Funny. No, Really.

Science Comedian Brian Malow
Credit Museum of Natural Sciences

For many comedians, the biggest dream is a packed house at a famous comedy club. But for science comedian Brian Malow, the dream is a room packed with science and engineering types, laughing at jokes only the geekiest among us might understand. Host Frank Stasio talks with Malow, curator of the Daily Planet at the Museum of Natural Sciences.

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The State of Things
11:29 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Meet Jane Smith Patterson

Jane Smith Patterson

For more than 40 years, Jane Smith Patterson has been paving the way for women in North Carolina politics and digital technology. After her start as a young organizer and activist in her hometown in Columbus County, North Carolina, Patterson left home for college when she was 16 years old. 

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Science & Technology
12:26 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Measles, Mumps And Polio, Oh My! Anti-Vaxxers Bring Back Diseases, Nothing's Changing Their Minds

Typhoid Vaccination
Credit Library of Congress CALL NUMBER: LC-USW36-828 [P&P] Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

In April of last year, a North Carolina resident developed a fever and rash shortly after returning from a trip to India. He had contracted measles abroad, and by the end of May, the North Carolina Division of Public Health identified 22 more cases of measles in the area. Many of those infected, including the initial patient, had not been vaccinated against the disease.

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Science & Technology
5:00 am
Sat March 15, 2014

How Speed Dating And A Nobel Prize Determines the Next Generation Of Doctors

Medical School Residency Match Day
Credit Guillermo Cabrera-Rojo / Flickr/Creative Commons

Next Friday, over 17,000 U.S. medical students will find out exactly what kind of doctor they will become. The process is called ‘the match’, and it works more like high-stakes speed dating than a job application process. 

During the last year of medical school, much like in high school, medical students apply to residency programs across the country. The programs then send invitations to select applicants to interview at their institution.

For some residency fields such as family medicine, students may only have to interview at a handful of institutions because there are more spots than there are U.S. students applying for that field. But for many other fields, such as plastic surgery or ophthalmology, students often interview at 15 or more places in order to have a good chance at matching. The process takes up to 3 months and can cost thousands of dollars. (Students are expected to pay these costs themselves.) 

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