Science & Technology

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The casual observer — or beachgoer — probably doesn't give too much thought to the reproductive lives of seahorses.

After all, it’s a classic storyline, right? Boy seahorse meets girl seahorse, seahorse gets pregnant, and a few weeks later, a bouncing brood of baby seahorses are born.

But that would be skimming over the coolest part about seahorse reproduction: “They're the only vertebrates — seahorses and pipefish, a group of about 300 species — where the males become truly pregnant,” says Luke Groskin.

Wearable, implantable ‘soft robots’ could someday make our bodies stronger

Feb 7, 2017

Heart failure — when the heart is too weak to pump enough blood through the body — affects nearly 6 million American adults. But recent innovations in muscle-like “soft robots” may someday provide a respite for heart failure patients, and patients suffering from a host of other muscular ailments.

Soft robots “are very different from conventional robots with rigid parts, but they're robotic in the sense that you can program them to achieve a predefined motion,” says Ellen Roche, a postdoctoral researcher at the National University of Ireland.

“Overall, discovering the world is a complicated business,” says the theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli. “And it goes slowly. It has always gone slowly. And it's still going slowly now, I believe.”

What would you do with data from more than 2 billion trips taken with the ride-booking service Uber?

Soon, you'll be able to explore the possibilities. The company recently debuted a new online tool called Movement, which provides data like ride durations between two points, based on GPS information. The tool is a dream for city planners and local governments, who can use it to learn more about commute patterns, and target infrastructure projects. And in the coming months, Uber wants to make Movement accessible to everyone.

The Secrets of Sticky Frog Saliva

Feb 4, 2017
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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Sure, they're space rocks that sometimes hurtle past Earth a little too close for comfort — asteroids, that is. But for researchers involved in two new NASA missions titled Lucy and Psyche, asteroids are much more than an occasional nuisance: They're time capsules that could unlock secrets of the early solar system.

Almost half of what we do at work could be automated by 2055

Jan 28, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/skewgee/3161505670/">Matthew Hurst</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

Almost half the activities people are paid to do globally could be automated using current levels of technology, according to a new report from the McKinsey Global Institute.

But before we start fretting about job security — or daydreaming about lives of leisure surrounded by "Jetsons"-style robot staff, the report includes a few other key details.

Building an Immunity to Fake News

Jan 28, 2017

How States Can Step Up for Science

Jan 28, 2017

The only physicist in Congress, on the state of science on the Hill

Jan 23, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/robcrawley/3113439955/">Rob Crawley</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

When the 115th Congress was sworn in on Jan. 3, there was no shortage of solemn ceremony, smiling children and photo ops with Joe Biden. But one thing the room lacked? Scientists.

“At this point, I think I am the only Ph.D. scientist of any kind [in Congress],” says Bill Foster, D-Illinois. “We have some political scientists, I think a mathematician, but it feels sort of lonely.”

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CDC/James Gathany

Despite the medical advances of the past century, malaria is still a global scourge. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 429,000 people died of malaria worldwide in 2015, and there were over 200 million new cases.

Solar panels are cheaper than ever. But some manufacturers are losing money.

Jan 21, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfws_pacificsw/8159035850/in/photostream/">Sarah Swenty/USFWS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.&nbsp;

The price of solar photovoltaic panels is coming down, and it’s great news for consumers, solar installers and the environment.

But not everyone is happy about cheap solar: The price of solar photovoltaics is so low, that, according to Bloomberg, some manufacturers were likely selling at a loss in December 2016.

Where Do Baby Seahorses Come From?

Jan 21, 2017

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