Science & Technology

Science news

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 26, 2017

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 25, 2017

The trouble with managing America’s wild horses

Oct 24, 2017

Around 75,000 wild horses roam the valleys and mountain ranges of the American West, descendants of long ago runaways. The horses have been protected by federal law since the early 1970s, but according to the Bureau of Land Management, their numbers are now almost three times what today’s range can support.

In New York, a whale of a comeback story

Oct 24, 2017
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Mathieu Belanger/Reuters

When you think of New York wildlife, whales probably aren’t the first animals that come to mind — but they’re actually native to the waters around the city. After disappearing from New York waters about a century ago because of pollution and overfishing, the massive animals are returning home.

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 23, 2017

In praise of boredom: Researchers dish on the brain benefits of idle time

Oct 22, 2017

When’s the last time you were really, truly bored?

In an age of smartphones, social media and a 24-hour news cycle, it might be tough to recall the last time you found yourself turning your attention to absolutely nothing. But that mental downtime, it turns out, is when a very important part of your brain gets to work.

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Molly Peterson/WWNO

Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people whose properties have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana’s 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating flood risk for decades.

Flood and repeat

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 21, 2017

How glow worms get their glow on

Oct 17, 2017
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Mnolf/<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arachnocampa_luminosa_larvae.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>

Visitors to certain New Zealand caves are treated to an amazing sight: Thousands of little lights twinkling on the cave walls, like Christmas lights. But the little lights aren’t bulbs or even fireflies — they’re glow worms.

“Technically, a glow worm is actually a glowing maggot, but that doesn't sound as romantic," says Miriam Sharpe, a biochemistry researcher at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

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