State Politics

Political news from around NC (and beyond).

photo of a gun show in Houston
M&R Glasgow / Flickr

Democrats in the Senate hold the floor in a 14-hour filibuster designed to force a vote on gun regulations. The measures, expected for votes next week, would restrict gun purchases for suspected terrorists and expand background checks. But the likelihood of passage seems low as the parties disagree on how to enforce the measures.

Photo of Claudia Ruíz Massieu and North Carolina legislators
Consulado General de Mexico en Raleigh

More than 35 million of the nation’s immigrant population comes from neighboring Mexico.

And America’s relationship with Mexico is at the top of political headlines, particularly when the GOP presidential candidate advocates building a wall along the 2,000 mile border.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs Claudia Ruíz Massieu.

A sign indicates food stamps are accepted.
Paul Sableman / Creative Commons

The North Carolina House is considering a bill that would increase disqualification periods for food stamp recipients who don't meet their work requirements. Able-bodied adults without children have to work or train for 20 hours a week in order to qualify for food stamps.

Trump supporters outside the Greensboro Coliseum Complex.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Thousands of people gathered at the Greensboro Coliseum Complex Tuesday night to hear a speech from the presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

Some people, including BJ Green, dedicated the entire day to the event. Green and his nine-year-old son, Jackson, arrived at noon from a small town in Virginia.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this week's WUNCPolitics Podcast: Backroom budget negotiations are in full swing, we know a little more about who will be representing North Carolina in Congress and the presidential campaign is already reaching its tentacles into North Carolina.

Flag of the United States of America, backlit, windy day.
Jnn13 / Wikipedia

Note: This program is a rebroadcast.

The divide between America's top earners and the rest of the population is wide and getting wider. 

Many experts point to the way in which the so-called "one percent" have used their economic power to tighten their grip on privilege as one reason for the widening gap.

photo of Congress
Lawrence Jackson, whitehouse.gov.

North Carolina held its second primary of the year Tuesday and voters cast their ballots for representatives in Congress and a seat on the state's highest judiciary.

U.S. Representative Alma Adams
U.S. Representative Alma Adams

Alma Adams is the Democratic nominee to represent North Carolina’s 12th District in Congress.

Adams is the incumbent in the 12th District, but it wasn’t a given that she would sail to victory.

Ted Budd at the ProShots firearms complex
Bud for Congress

Ted Budd, a gun shop owner from Davie County and a first-time political candidate, took the Republican party’s nomination for the 13th Congressional District on Tuesday night. He emerges from a field of 17 candidates for a seat that will favor the GOP nominee in the November general election.

Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC)
United States Government

It was supposed to be a tough race for U.S. Rep. Walter Jones. But the state's longest-serving sitting congressman cruised to victory last night in the 3rd Congressional District's Republican primary.

Photo of Wake County Judge Mike Morgan and Incumbent Bob Edmunds
Courtesy of NC Supreme Court

A field of candidates vying for a spot on the state Supreme Court has been cut in half.

Incumbent Bob Edmunds and Wake County Judge Mike Morgan received the top two vote totals on Tuesday.

Portraint of George Holding
Courtesy of George Holding

Congressman George Holding is all but guaranteed a third term in the U.S. House of Represenatives after defeating Renee Ellmers on Tuesday in North Carolina's second primary.

The North Carolina Memorial Day Parade in Thomasville
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

When a federal court struck down part of North Carolina’s congressional maps earlier this year saying they were illegal gerrymanders, state lawmakers created a new district that drew immediate attention from dozens of political hopefuls.

U.S. House of Representatives

Voters head to the polls Tuesday for North Carolina's second primary where they will decide congressional races and a swing seat on the state Supreme Court.

One of the more competitive contests is in parts of the Triangle where two familiar elected officials are battling for one seat. It's the only race of its kind in the country - and redistricting is to thank.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, we take deep dive into the senate's budget, a shallower dive into some polluted reservoirs, and skim across the surface of some Congressional races. 

Managing Editor for News Dave DeWitt and reporters Jorge Valencia and Jeff Tiberii discuss the week's news.

Photo: Map of North Carolina
Flickr user Lindley Ashline

State Rep. Pricey Harrison, D- Guilford, wants to reinvigorate a bill to create a nonpartisan redistricting commission.

She joined a bipartisan coalition pushing for reform at a press conference last week.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

Early voting is underway in North Carolina's second primary of the year. Two incumbent members of Congress face off against each other. Also on the ballot is a seat on the state's Supreme Court.

At the legislature, the Senate wraps up its budget proposal and lawmakers move behind closed doors to hash out a compromise between the House and Senate plans.

Host Frank Stasio talks with political junkie Ken Rudin about the latest.

Photo: Senate Leader Phil Berger  and Sen. Harry Brown
Jorge Valencia

Lawmakers in Raleigh are one step closer to finalizing a spending plan for North Carolina.

State senators on Thursday gave tentative approval to their version of the budget, with 33 Republicans voting in favor and 15 Democrats against. The plan would increase average teacher pay and would give pay raises for some state employees.

photo of the North Carolina Senate
Government & Heritage Library, State Library of NC / Flickr

The North Carolina Senate reveals its version of the state's budget today.

Like the House plan, the Senate proposal raises teacher pay and other state employee salaries. And a Senate plan to change tuition structure at some state universities, including three historically black colleges and universities, is creating controversy. Plus calls for repeal of House Bill 2 continue with a rally of small business owners.

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol reporter Jorge Valencia about the latest.

State Senate chamber
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

The state Senate is debating its biannual spending plan this week.

Top Republicans are highlighting a modest increase in overall state spending. They’re also highlighting an average teacher pay raise of 13.5 percent, although details are still scarce on how the plan will provide for the increases.

photo of airport security lines
Kitt Hodsden / Wikimedia Commons

Memorial Day weekend is a peak travel time. And with more than two million travelers in TSA security lines over the holiday weekend, flying was as hassle-filled as driving.

Members of Congress have called for TSA reforms and the administration removed a top official last week. Are the changes enough to shorten the lines and keep the skies safe?

Host Frank Stasio talks with Time Warner Cable senior Washington reporter Geoff Bennett about the TSA challenges.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, we play a rousing game of "Big Deal, Or No Deal?"

We will analyze Senator Phil Berger's plan for teacher raises, the House bill that revives the Coal Ash Management Commission, the presidential election in North Carolina, and much more.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

High profile leaders from both sides of the political aisle try to move the state towards compromise on House Bill 2.

And at the capitol, lawmakers continue to negotiate details of the state budget. In particular, the two chambers do not have common ground on the amount and distribution of teacher pay.

And on the national stage, Trump says he officially has the delegates for the GOP nomination, and buzz continues about possible vice presidential selections.

Host Frank Stasio talks with political junkie Ken Rudin about the latest.

A picture of a coal ash pond.
Waterkeeper Alliance

State lawmakers are again wrangling with Governor Pat McCrory over coal ash cleanup.

The House has approved a bill reconstituting the coal ash management commission. Lawmakers organized this group once before. But McCrory sued fellow Republicans saying it usurped his power.

Photo: Senate Leader Phil Berger, a Republican from Rockingham County
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

A plan introduced Wednesday at the legislature by Senate Republicans would increase average annual teacher pay, and move North Carolina to the top of compensation in the southeast. The plan is significant in size, and represents a bargaining chip in the ongoing budget negotiations between the Senate and House.

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