Politics & Government

Political news

Pres. Barack Obama at Forsyth Tech
Jennifer Rotenizer, Winston-Salem Journal

There have been encouraging signs the economy is no longer shrinking – but growing.   President Barack Obama told a crowd in Winston-Salem yesterday he will continue to fight for investments in education and innovation – a move he says will help continue the country’s economic recovery.   The president’s words were welcomed by students and staff at Forsyth Technical Community College where they’re in the business of re-invention and re-training.

Rep. Tim Moore
NC General Assembly

State Republicans plan to introduce a bill that would require voters in North Carolina to present identification… possibly photo identification… before casting votes. Republicans have tried to pass this sort of bill before. But they’ve been the minority party.  They will take over the House and Senate in January.

Election Turnout Doesn't Match Hype

Dec 3, 2010
Bob Hall
Democracy NC

Despite all the media coverage of last month’s elections, the majority of North Carolina voters did not cast a ballot.

44% of the state’s registered voters cast a ballot in this year’s midterm elections. That’s better than 37% in 2006, but Bob Hall with Democracy North Carolina says it’s still pretty low.

All Raleigh City taxi cabs now have flashing lights in case the driver experiences a threatening situation. Police want citizens to call 911 if they see amber lights flashing from a taxi cab's trunk or grille. A city law requires all drivers to have the silent alarm system. Officials adopted the law after an unusually high number of cab robberies in 2008.

New State Laws Take Effect

Dec 1, 2010
Susie, the burned dog who inspired Susie's Law
Laura Leslie

New state laws take effect today on issues ranging from video gambling and Medicaid fraud to animal abuse.

Clinton In Greensboro

Nov 30, 2010
Clinton
Bryan Series

Former President Bill Clinton will speak in Greensboro tonight. He is appearing as part of Guilford College's Bryan Lecture Series.

Fifty years ago, on Feb. 1, four black college students sat down at a whites-only Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C. The "Greensboro Four," along with friends and supporters, returned to the counter every day for six months until the lunch counter was desegregated.

Their determination to resist Jim Crow laws inspired thousands of peaceful sit-ins and helped to end official segregation in the South. On Monday, in the same building that once housed the Woolworth's store, the International Civil Rights Center & Museum opens.

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