Politics & Government

Political news

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie.
kenrudinpolitics.com

North Carolina lawmakers say they need more time to reconcile differences about the state budget.

They passed another continuing resolution yesterday that funds the government through September 18.

It's the third time they have had to create a stop-gap spending measure since the fiscal year started nearly two months ago.

Meanwhile, Republican Rep. Mark Meadows of North Carolina has again hinted at requesting a vote to remove House Speaker John Boehner from his position. 

State Senator Tom Apodaca
Dave DeWitt

State lawmakers continue to negotiate a state budget and are touting improvement, but are also asking for additional deliberation time.

Policymakers announced progress on the Senate floor Wednesday afternoon. Senator Harry Brown (R-Onslow) said subcommittees now have target spending amounts, and an agreement on salary adjustments for state workers has been reached in principal.

Charmaine McKissick-Melton at a ceremony for Sigma Tau Delta, an English honor society.
Chi Brown / NCCU Office of University Relations

In 1963, the Durham School Board extended the desegregation of schools to elementary school students. Third-grader Charmaine McKissick-Melton and her brother, Floyd Jr., were two of the first African-Americans to integrate North Durham Elementary School.

NC General Assembly
Jorge Valencia

Republican leaders in the state house and senate have finally reached an agreement on at least part of the state budget.

They have made a deal that sets the budget at $21.735 billion. They still need to iron out agreements on state employee raises and funding for teaching assistants.

  Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC Capitol bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about the latest.

U.S. Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) focused on national security at a Raleigh luncheon Thursday afternoon. The 20-year veteran of Congress has ascended to Chairman of the Intelligence Committee. He has spent this week in North Carolina talking to donors and constituents. Among the topics were:

- The proposed nuclear deal with Iran:

"I don't think the American people are for this. I think the opposition will continue to grow. And I think that over time if this happens this will be looked at as a foreign policy disaster - of this administration."

Aeyron Scout drone
creative commons

More drones could soon take to skies across the state.

Lawmakers approved legislation Wednesday that paves the way for local government and civilian permitting of unmanned aerial vehicles.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt

Seven weeks after a state budget was supposed to be finalized, leading Republicans have made a breakthrough in negotiations.

Ari Berman's book 'Give Us The Ballot' looks at voting in America since the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The modern voting rights movement starts and ends with the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

The landmark piece of legislation was meant to give African-American voters open access to the polls.

Today, the law is still at the center of the debate about whether states can restrict that access.

Several states, including North Carolina, have passed new elections laws since the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, leading to both federal and state court challenges.

An image of Julian Bond
Eduardo Montes-Bradley / Wikipedia Creative Commons

Julian Bond, civil rights leader and former chairman of the NAACP, died this weekend. He was 75.

Bond fought for equal rights for decades, leaving behind a legacy of social justice as one of the original leaders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and former president of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

A portrait of Deondra Rose when she was four
Deondra Rose

Deondra Rose has always been 10 steps ahead of her peers.

She took an interest in government and politics in first grade while running for student council and says that many of her most vivid memories about growing up revolve around electoral politics—like when she lost her first election in 4th grade because she refused to vote for herself.

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