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The Two-Way
3:24 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Prosecutors: Boston Marathon Bomb Suspect 'Readily Admitted' Guilt

Boston bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on April 19, 2013, as he emerged from a boat stored in a Watertown, Mass., backyard. The red dot of a police sharpshooter's laser sight can be seen on his forehead.
Mass. State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy Boston Magazine

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 5:31 pm

Prosecutors released new details about the Boston Marathon bombing in a court filing Wednesday.

They released the full text of a note that suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote while hiding out and detailed the mechanisms used to detonate the bombs that killed three people and injured more than 260 others on April 15, 2013.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

House Passes Restrictions On NSA's Collection Of Phone Records

Speaker John Boehner prepares to speak to the media after the House passed the USA Freedom Act, an NSA reform bill aimed at restricting access to Americans' phone records.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 2:02 pm

The House passed a measure to end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of phone records, approving a scaled-back version of legislation that was prompted by leaks from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.

The 303-121 vote, however "sent an unambiguous signal that both parties are no longer comfortable with giving the N.S.A. unfettered power to collect bulk surveillance data," according to The New York Times.

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Too Beaucoup: France's New Trains Are Wider Than Its Platforms

A SNCF Regional Express Train is seen at Hazebrouck's train station in northern France on Thursday. France's train operators admit they made a mistake in ordering new trains that will require millions of dollars to modify station platforms.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 4:24 pm

Some 2,000 new trains that were meant to help France expand its regional rail network are instead causing headaches and embarrassment, as officials have been forced to explain why the trains aren't compatible with hundreds of station platforms. The new trains are just a few centimeters too wide to fit.

The country's rail operators say they're spending millions of dollars to modify platforms to accommodate the new trains, which cost billions of dollars. A French newspaper reported on the mix-up Tuesday, saying the platforms were too narrow for the trains to pass through.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

NOAA Forecasts Quiet Atlantic Hurricane Season In 2014

A satellite image provided by NASA shows Superstorm Sandy on Oct. 30, 2012.
NASA Getty Images

Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean will be at or below normal levels this year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's annual forecast.

The six-month hurricane season begins June 1.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Russia, China Block U.N. Move To Investigate War Crimes In Syria

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:41 pm

A U.N. Security Council resolution that calls for the International Criminal Court to investigate war crimes in Syria has failed, after Russia and China voted against the measure Thursday.

The resolution seeking accountability for wartime atrocities was introduced by France and had the backing of the U.S.

For our Newscast unit, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports:

"Although more than 60 countries supported the resolution, Russia dismissed the vote as a publicity stunt , once again shielding Syrian leader Bashar al Assad's regime.

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The Two-Way
10:53 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Norman Rockwell Painting 'The Rookie' Sells For $22.5 Million

Norman Rockwell's The Rookie, seen here on display in 2005, sold at auction for $22.5 million Thursday.
Chitose Suzuki AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 2:27 pm

Norman Rockwell's The Rookie has sold for $22.5 million at auction Thursday. The 1957 painting of baseball players in a locker room was sold by Christie's auction house — heady heights for a work that first appeared on a magazine that sold for 15 cents.

Update at 12:50 p.m. The Final Price

While the "hammer price" of the Rockwell painting was $20 million, Christie's says the painting's final price is $22,565,000, reflecting a buyer's premium. We've updated this post to reflect the auction house's final calculation.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Thu May 22, 2014

NATO Says It Sees 'Limited' Russian Troop Activity Near Ukraine

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 12:01 pm

Earlier this week, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced he was pulling his country's troops back from its border with Ukraine. Thursday, NATO officials said they're seeing signs Russia's troops might withdraw, although many soldiers remain near the border.

NATO's leader reports seeing "limited Russian troop activity" close to the border, which could suggest "some of these forces are preparing to withdraw."

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Ukrainian Soldiers Killed In Attack By Separatists

Ukrainian soldiers inspect the site of a gunfight near the village of Blahodatne in eastern Ukraine Thursday. At least 11 Ukrainian troops were killed and about 30 others were wounded when Pro-Russians attacked a military checkpoint.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 2:44 pm

Pro-Russian separatists attacked a military checkpoint in eastern Ukraine on Thursday, killing at least 13 soldiers and wounding about 30, according to Ukraine's acting prime minister. The country is preparing to hold national elections on Sunday.

A separatist commander told The Associated Press that one of his men also died.

The attack took place near the village of Blahodatne in Donetsk, one of two main areas in eastern Ukraine where separatists say they want to break away from the country and its interim government.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Coup In Thailand: Military Seizes Control Of Country

Thai soldiers patrol after army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha announced that the armed forces were seizing power after months of political turmoil.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 11:37 am

Thailand's army is now running the country. Two days after declaring martial law — and saying it wasn't staging a coup — the military has changed its mind, Thailand's army chief says.

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