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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Ex-Ambassador To Syria: Civil War Could Drag On For Years

Former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford covers his nose from the smell of dead bodies during a visit to a mass grave in the country in 2011. Ford has criticized the U.S. failure to back opposition forces early on.
Bassem Tellawi AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 7:18 pm

When Robert Ford — the U.S. ambassador to Syria — resigned in February, he said he no longer felt he could defend American policy in that country. Ford faults the U.S. for having been unable to address the root causes of the conflict and for being consistently behind the curve as the Syrian civil war intensified.

The diplomat had to leave Damascus in early 2012 and had been working on Syria from Washington until his resignation.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Attack On Mother In India Underscores U.N. Call For Action

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 10:00 am

As U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon took notice of the global assault against women and girls, another brutal attack in India has highlighted once more the prevalence of gender-based crime in the world's largest democracy.

Police say a mother of five was shot dead by militants in a remote village in the northeast of the country after she resisted attempts to molest her.

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The Two-Way
4:47 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

NFL Says When It Comes To Super Bowl 50, 'L' Is For Losers

NFL loses the roman numerals.
NFL

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:49 pm

The old saying goes, "When in Rome, do as the Romans."

But in the case of the Roman numeral for 50, the National Football League has decided, at least for 2016 (and, admittedly in San Francisco, not Rome), to do as the Arabs.

The official explanation is that "Super Bowl L" just isn't as pleasing to the eye as its Arabic numeral equivalent, "Super Bowl 50."

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

1 Baby, 3 Parents: Scientists Say Due Date Is In Two Years

A British scientific panel has been reviewing treatments for mitochondrial disease that involve using material from two women and one man with the goal of producing a healthy baby.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 6:17 pm

A new medical technique that could prevent mitochondrial disease would also create babies with three parents, a British health agency says. Officials say the time is coming for a technique that would use material from two women and one man to produce a healthy embryo.

"I think that [two years] is not a bad estimation," Robin Lovell-Badge of the Medical Research Council tells the BBC. "The other sorts of experiments that we thought were necessary, again it will take about two years to complete all of those."

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Last Of The Navajo 'Code Talkers' Dies At 93

Chester Nez, one of 29 Navajo Code Talkers whose language skills thwarted the Japanese military in World War II, is shown in a November 2009 photo. Nez died on Wednesday.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 7:33 pm

The last of the Navajo "Code Talkers" who used their native language as the basis of a cipher that confounded the Japanese military during World War II has died at age 93.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

NRA Retracts Statement Calling Open Carry Rallies 'Downright Weird'

Kory Watkins, a coordinator for Open Carry Tarrant County, and his wife, Janie, gather for a demonstration in Haltom City, Texas. The NRA posted a statement calling this kind of open carry rally counterproductive; on Tuesday, it retracted the statement.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 3:35 pm

A few days after posting a criticism of "open carry" rallies, the National Rifle Association says the statement reflected a staffer's opinion, not the stance of the organization, reports member station KERA.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Tilting Delaware Bridge Stays Closed, Disrupting Interstate Travel

Surveyors work below the Interstate 495 bridge over the Christina River near Wilmington, Del., on Tuesday. The bridge was closed at the beginning of the week after officials discovered that eight support columns were tilting.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 6:41 pm

A bridge on a major interstate in Delaware will remain closed indefinitely as engineers work to identify why four pairs of support pillars are tilting.

The I-495 bridge, part of an 11-mile bypass around Wilmington, Del., normally carries 90,000 vehicles a day. It was closed on Monday after transportation officials became aware of the leaning pillars, which have tilted as much as 4 percent out of vertical alignment.

Drivers are now being redirected through downtown Wilmington. Local traffic on Tuesday was substantially disrupted.

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Germany Opens Formal Inquiry Into Tapping Of Merkel's Phone

German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a session of the Bundestag Lower House of Parliament in Berlin Wednesday. Germany's top federal prosecutor told legislators today that he is opening a formal inquiry into allegations that the NSA tapped her phone.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 3:12 pm

Germany's top federal prosecutor is investigating allegations that the U.S. National Security Agency tapped Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone. The inquiry won't focus on wide spying activities attributed to the agency, which allegedly included snooping on data connections and companies in Germany.

As newspaper Deutsche Welle reports, the public announcement is a reversal from last week, when it seemed the prosecutor wouldn't pursue the case.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Wed June 4, 2014

25 Years After Tiananmen Protests, Chinese Media Keep It Quiet

Chinese paramilitary police stand guard in Tiananmen Square in Beijing on June 4, the 25th anniversary of a violent crackdown on protesters by Chinese troops.
Kevin Frayer Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 2:23 pm

On the 25th anniversary of the massacre that broke up pro-democracy protests in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, China's government is quashing many attempts to mention the fateful date, with heavy security and online monitoring.

"Silence surrounds this anniversary. So, too, does repression," NPR's Louisa Lim reports. "For the first time, activists trying to hold private commemorations have been detained."

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