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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Colorado Collected $2.1 Million In January Taxes On Recreational Pot

Marijuana is stored in bins for trimming and packaging in preparation to be sold retail at 3D Cannabis Center, in Denver.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 6:38 pm

For the first time since it legalized recreational marijuana, Colorado is releasing revenue figures: The state made $3.5 million in taxes and fees in January.

As KUSA-TV reports, $2.1 million of that came from the sale of recreational pot and $1.4 million came from medical marijuana.

KUSA adds:

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Despite Diplomatic Tensions, U.S.-Russia Space Ties Persist

Russian personnel are the first to meet space station crew members when they return to earth.
Bill Ingalls NASA

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 7:40 am

Update 1:15 a.m. EDT Tuesday:

A Russian Soyuz capsule carrying a U.S.-Russian crew has landed safely in Kazakhstan, according to NASA. American Mike Hopkins and Russians Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy had spent 166 days in space. Russian space officials had considered delaying the landing because of heavy snowfall and strong winds but decided to go ahead with the original plan.

Original Post:

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The Two-Way
4:53 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Prosecutors Say D.C. Mayor Knew About Shadow Campaign

Washington Mayor Vincent Gray.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:40 am

A vast and long-running federal investigation has now implicated D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray.

Businessman Jeffrey Thompson pleaded guilty to conspiracy, admitting that he funneled more than $2 million into illegal campaign contributions, including hundreds of thousands of dollars to a shadow campaign to help elect the Democratic mayor.

But the bombshell is that Thompson says Gray knew about the secret and illegal effort to help his cause.

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The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Smithsonian Institution Gets A New Director

Cornell University President David Skorton speaks during a news conference Monday in Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:36 pm

The new head of the Smithsonian Institution was announced Monday. David Skorton will leave his job as president of Cornell University to become the institution's 13th secretary since its founding in 1846.

Skorton becomes the first physician to lead the Smithsonian. He's a board-certified cardiologist and amateur jazz musician. Most importantly for the Smithsonian, he's a skilled fundraiser. Skorton led a team that raised $5 billion during his eight years at Cornell.

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Family Trust Wins Supreme Court Fight Against Bike Trail

A Wyoming man has won a Supreme Court case fighting efforts to route the Medicine Bow Rail Trail through his family's property. On this map, the trail is the unmarked route moving from the lower right toward Fox Park, where Marvin Brandt lives.
Google Maps

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:20 pm

The federal government loses its control of land that's granted to railroad companies after the track has been abandoned, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday. The court sided with a private landowner in Wyoming who is fighting efforts to convert disused tracks into a bike path near his house.

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Edward Snowden Tells SXSW He'd Leak Those Secrets Again

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 1:11 pm

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who has leaked large amounts of classified information about the agency's electronic surveillance programs, spoke via video to a sympathetic audience at South By Southwest Interactive on Monday.

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Mexican Drug Lord Shot Dead ... For Second Time

Nazario Moreno Gonzalez, in an image from one of the quasi-religious books his cartel distributed.
Heriberto Rodriguez MCT/Landov

Nazario Moreno Gonzalez, one of Mexico's reputed drug lords, has now been killed twice.

Well, perhaps we should say that he's been declared dead for the second time.

The head of "the cultlike, pseudo-Christian La Familia cartel" was supposedly killed back in December 2010 during a two-day shootout with police.

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The Two-Way
10:54 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Sandy Hook Killer's Father Wishes His Son Hadn't Been Born

Flowers, candles and stuffed animals at a makeshift memorial in Newtown, Conn., the week after 20 children and 6 adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:47 am

"How much do I beat up on myself about the fact that he's my son? A lot."

The New Yorker has posted a long piece based on six interviews with Peter Lanza, whose son Adam killed 20 first-graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 14, 2012.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Aaaahh: Thirsty California Enjoys A Drink Of Water

A steady cascade of water is released below Peters Dam in Marin County, Calif. Recent rainfall has improved conditions in parts of California, but the state remains in a drought.
Mark Andrew Boyer KQED

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 2:23 pm

Recent rains have brought wet relief to parched sections of California, a state Gov. Jerry Brown declared to be in a drought emergency in January. The problem is far from solved — but the fresh water is a welcome addition to reservoirs.

The rains led member station KQED's Mark Andrew Boyer to take a look at reservoirs in northern Marin County. One example of what he found is above; there are more at the KQED website.

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