Military

Fort Bragg
Fort Bragg

The annual Thanksgiving holiday meal and best dining facility competition starts Tuesday at Fort Bragg. Some 20,000 military service members, family and retirees are expected to attend.  Chief Roshaun Anderson is food advisor for the 82nd Sustainment Brigade.  He says the event is like the food service Super Bowl on post.

UNC Press

    

In the 1600s, European settlers invaded Eastern North Carolina where nations like the Tuscarora, Machapunga, and Core Indians resided.

Courtesy NClegion.com

When Patricia Harris became leader of the North Carolina Department of the American Legion, she was the first African-American and the first female to take the post. 

Veteran student, Fort Bragg
Fayetteville Tech Community College

    

One of the most pressing concerns for armed services members returning home is employment.

Here's video of a dramatic Coast Guard and Navy rescue off the North Carolina Coast. Watch as the Coast Guard and the crew of the Navy destroyer USS Cole rescue three people Sunday. Those rescued were from a sailboat, Wings, located approximately 210 miles offshore of North Carolina coast in the Atlantic Ocean.

Soldier saluting
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

North Carolina is taking a day to recognize the estimated 700,000-plus veterans living in the state.

American Legion branches around North Carolina are honoring local veterans today after parades in Raleigh and Fayetteville over the weekend.  N.C. Central University is among those that have invited veterans to speak at their events today. 

Ann Jones of Fayetteville Technical Community College says the school is hosting its own Veterans Day ceremony Monday morning.  She says veterans who take classes there use their experience to help fellow students.

Military Jobs
usmilitary.com

A report by the state Commerce Department highlights the economic impact of the military in North Carolina.

The Commerce Department says the state has a tremendous opportunity to grow the economy by helping military personnel find employment after their service ends. 

More than 60,000 people stationed in North Carolina are projected to leave the military over the next five years.  Commerce spokesman Josh Ellis says many of them will stay here.

37th US Colored Troops re-enactors participated in Pvt. Frank Worthington's headstone ceremony, Civil war
Leoneda Inge

The city of New Bern is honoring black Civil War soldiers with an official state highway marker. 

It's meant to mark the  flag of the city's 1st NC Colored Volunteers, raised there in the spring of 1863. That was shortly after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation - effectively freeing African American slaves in areas of rebellion against the union.  New Bern native Bernard George is an administrator in the city's planning department. He says, just as importantly, it allowed African American slaves to enlist in the army.

Soldier saluting
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

First Lieutenant Nathan Rimpf of Raleigh lost both his legs to an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan last year.  He received a Purple Heart and got two titanium legs when he returned. And on Thursday he'll be a new home owner.

The NC National Guard responds to New York after Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
The National Guard / Flickr Creative Commons

More than a hundred North Carolina Air and Army National Guard units are trying to reschedule training time they missed during the government shutdown. 

That amounts to about 6,400 troops who could not conduct three weekend drills earlier this month.  Maj. Matthew Devivo says a short lapse in funding was enough to make conducting drills impossible.

"That's operational funds.  That's maintenance funds.  We couldn't move equipment to do training and we couldn't feed the soldiers who would come to drill," Devivo says.

The memorial commemorating the victims of the 1983 bombing in Beirut
Michael D. Dunn / Flickr Creative Commons

Marines at Camp Lejeune are remembering the 1983 bombing of their base in Beirut, Lebanon.

It was 30 years ago Wednesday that a truck loaded with explosives crashed into the barracks and killed 241 service members. Dan Joy was a corporal there. He says he and other surviving veterans have been gathering this week.

"When we started talking, little tidbits of things that we did sort of all came back, you know, and they were just young kids," Joy said.

https://twitter.com/JayinKabul

    

The American military is drawing down forces in Afghanistan.

As troops depart and resources return home, on-the-ground media coverage of the conflict winds down as well. Reporter Jay Price has covered the country on three different tours. He also covered the war in Iraq for the News & Observer and its parent company, McClatchy Newspapers.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Jay Price about his experiences as a war correspondent and his unique perspective on America’s conflicts.

United States Marine Corps

Camp Lejeune now has a memorial for military service members wounded in the line of duty. A Purple Heart memorial was given an official dedication Friday.

Captain Ryan Powell is from the Wounded Warrior Battalion Regiment at Quantico, Virginia. He says the memorial is being located near the Wounded Warrior Battalion-East headquarters which provides non-medical care for injured Marines on base. That includes a recovery protocol that also treats the mind, body and spirit...

US Coast Guard

The Coast Guard suspended its search Wednesday night for a missing boater near Cape Lookout.  The man sent out a distress call Tuesday night saying that his 22-foot Bayliner was taking on water.  He said his plan was to put on his life vest, gather some supplies and swim about 200 yards to shore. 

Petty Officer 1st Class Brandyn Hill says it appears the unidentified boater was well prepared in the event of trouble

"Having a life jacket is one of the most important things to help keep that person above the water and prevent them from drowning," says Hill. 

Teachers at North Carolina's military bases are preparing for up to five furlough days due to cuts from the sequester
Fort Bragg

Civilian employees at North Carolina's military bases are back at work after four furlough days from the government shutdown. 

The recall comes after the Department of Defense said this weekend a stop-gap budget law that keeps the military funded during the shutdown includes civilian workers.  Most of the 800 civilian employees who were furloughed from Camp Lejeune are back at work after the DOD reviewed the language in the Pay Our Military Act.

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