Law

After Innocence: Exoneration in America
6:00 am
Wed June 12, 2013

After Innocence: The 99th Person Exonerated Due To DNA Evidence

Exoneree Marvin Anderson
Credit David Persoff

Marvin Anderson was exonerated in 2001 after spending 15 years in a Virginia prison and four years on parole for crimes he did not commit. His exoneration was granted after DNA evidence excluded him from the crimes, and he was the 99th person in the country to be exonerated due to DNA evidence gathered post-conviction. But had some evidence been taken more seriously at his original trial, Anderson never would have had to serve prison time for someone else’s crimes in the first place.

Read more
After Innocence: Exoneration in America
4:24 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

After Innocence: Jeffrey Deskovic Was Incarcerated At 17, Exonerated At 33

Exoneree Jeffrey Deskovic
Credit David Persoff

Jeffrey Deskovic was 16 when one of his female classmates, Angela Correa, was found murdered in the woods in their hometown in upstate New York.  He says didn’t know her well, but she was always friendly to him in the school hallways.  At the girl’s funeral, Jeffrey broke down in heavy sobs and visited her wake multiple times.  It was there that some people started to suspect that he might have had something to do with the murder.

Read more
After Innocence: Exoneration in America
12:30 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

After Innocence: What It's Like To Spend 26 Years Behind Bars, Innocent

Johnnie Lindsey was exonerated after 26 years in prison.
Credit David Persoff

In 1981, a 27-year-old white woman was riding her bike when she was attacked and raped by a shirtless African American man. A rape kit was collected, and a line-up of potential perpetrators was assembled for the victim to review, but she did not identify anyone. A year later, the police mailed her six photos from a new line-up. There were two men without shirts. The victim picked out Johnnie Lindsey, one of the shirtless men, as the perpetrator, and in 1983 he was charged with the crime.

Read more
After Innocence: Exoneration in America
5:00 am
Tue June 11, 2013

After Innocence: Julie Baumer Wrongly Convicted Of Child Abuse

Exoneree Julie Baumer
Credit David Persoff

When Julie Baumer rushed her new-born nephew Philipp to the hospital on October 3, 2003, she had no idea what was wrong. He couldn’t keep his formula down for more than a few hours and wouldn’t take a bottle. Philipp was 6 weeks old and has spent the first week of his life in the neonatal intensive-care-unit after a difficult delivery. His mother, Julie’s sister, struggled with drug addiction and had already given up one child for adoption. Not wanting to see another child leave the family, Julie had offered to help care for her sister’s infant.

Read more
After Innocence: Exoneration in America
4:30 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

After Innocence: 27 Years In Prison, Exoneree Now Works To Free Others

Charles Chatman spent 27 years in prison an innocent person.
Credit David Persoff

One of the longest prison sentences ever served by an innocent person was done by Charles Chatman of Dallas County Texas. Chatman, a black man, was wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in 1981 and sentenced to 99 years in prison. He served nearly 27 years before he was exonerated in 2008. Although he went before the parole board multiple times during his sentence, he was never granted parole because he never admitted guilt.

Read more
After Innocence: Exoneration In America
1:00 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

After Innocence: ‘How Many More Is It Going To Take?’

Exoneree Damon Thibodeaux
Credit David Persoff

Damon Thibodeaux has a lot to be angry about. In 1997, when he was 22 years old, he was wrongfully convicted of murder and spent the next 15 years on death row, terrified of dying for a crime he did not commit. But he’s trying not to dwell on that.  At 38 years old, he’s focusing on the years he has in front of him.

Read more
After Innocence: Exoneration In America
5:00 am
Mon June 10, 2013

After Innocence: Wrongfully Convicted Of Murder, Exonerated Days Before Execution Date

Exoneree John Thompson
Credit David Persoff

John Thompson was a 22-year-old father of two when the New Orleans police broke down his door to arrest him. What happened next was like a nightmare. He was taken to the homicide division, where he listened to a cassette tape of a man he knew accuse him of murder. The acquaintance had sold him a gun recently, which turned out to be the murder weapon. Then, other people around the neighborhood started coming forward with additional, unrelated crime reports and pinned them on Thompson. A neighbor said that he looked like the man who robbed his children. He became a suspect for an unsolved armed robbery that had occurred weeks earlier.

Read more
Law
5:00 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

ACLU Report Finds Major Race Disparity In Marijuana Arrests

African Americans are 3.7 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana than white people.
Credit Colleen Danger, via flickr, Creative Commons

A new report from the ACLU says African Americans are more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana possession in North Carolina.  The survey released today says African Americans were arrested at three times the rate of whites in 2010.  A US Health Department report from the same year showed similar rates of marijuana use among both ethnic groups nationwide. 

Read more
Law
6:55 am
Tue May 28, 2013

E-Ban In Rockingham County

Credit Flickr.com

Beginning June 1st, electronic devices will be banned from the Rockingham County Courthouse.

Rockingham County is implementing a ban on all electronics at its courthouse. There have not been any major security problems that triggered the new rule. Officials call the new measure a proactive step toward keeping the courthouse safe.

Read more
Crime
4:10 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

Changes At Duke Energy Substations Crack Down On Copper Thieves

Duke Energy Progress is installing security measures to cut down on copper theft at its substations.
Credit Laura Candler

Duke Energy Progress has completed upgrades to substations in Durham and Greensboro designed to cut down on copper thefts. 

The company has changed the wire it uses, added security cameras and installed more lighting to keep thieves away.  Authorities have reported frequent copper thefts from the Parkwood Tie Station in Durham and the Main Substation in Greensboro.  The metal goes for nearly $3.00 a pound in resale.

Read more

Pages