Law

Photo of Samuel Buell
Duke Law School - Duke Photography

In 2001, Enron Corporation, which was once the sixth-largest energy company in the world, filed for bankruptcy.

It has since become one of the most notorious examples of accounting fraud and corporate crime. However, incidents of corporate crime persisted after the Enron scandal and led to further economic turmoil in the 2008 financial crisis.

An image of Doriane Lameblet Coleman
Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Growing up, Doriane Lambelet Coleman did not see herself as an athlete, but she always had a talent for running. She moved back and forth between her home country of Switzerland and the United States as a kid, and she never found a stable community until she started running track in high school.

Wake County Sheriff's Office

Raleigh resident Chad Copley is facing first-degree murder charges in the death of Kouren-Rodney Thomas. UNC law professor Joseph Kennedy said given the facts released so far about the shooting, it doesn't appear to fall under state laws authorizing the use of deadly force.

Photo of a girl with red tape over her mouth
stock.tookapic.com / Pexels

North Carolina is among the top 10 states with the highest number of reported human trafficking cases, according to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center. Experts say the number of major interstates that cross through the state, the large agricultural population, and the state’s strategic location along the East Coast contribute to the issue.

photo of Wildin Acosta
Courtesy of the Acosta family

Attorneys for a Durham teenager who is being held at an immigration detention center in Georgia say they expect him to be released soon. 

In the early hours of Sunday morning, a 20-year old African American man was shot to death in North Raleigh. Tapes of the 911 calls  feature the accused shooter, Chad Cameron Copley, declaring himself a member of neighborhood watch who fired what he called warning shots that hit Kouren-Rodney Bernard Thomas. Copley said there were "hoodlums" on his street and told the 911 operator that he was going out to "secure" the neighborhood. Copley has been charged with first-degree murder. Host Frank Stasio talks with News and Observer reporter Ron Gallagher about the latest.

A picture of an 'I Voted' sticker.
Vox Efx / Flickr

Officials with the North Carolina State Board of Elections are scrambling to undo three years of work on the state's voter identification law ahead of the November election.

An image of an adult holding a child
Pexels / Creative Commons

 Note: This segment originally aired on Wednesday, April 27, 2016.

More than 179,000 children in North Carolina have had a parent incarcerated, according to a new report. As a result, these children are more likely to face emotional trauma and financial instability.

The report recommends improving a child's relationship with the incarcerated parent and the community as a way to lessen these burdens.

East Durham, Durham, Police, Poverty, EDCI
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Editor's note: This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

Every Friday in the basement of the Maureen Joy Charter School on South Driver Street in Durham, families get a bag of food packed with oatmeal, fruit bars, noodles, tuna, fruit boxes and more.

photo of Wildin Acosta
Courtesy of the Acosta family

The U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Immigration Appeals will reopen the case of an undocumented Durham teen in Georgia's Stewart Detention Center.

Wildin Acosta, 19, was arrested in January on his way to Durham's Riverside High School. He says he came to the U.S. illegally to avoid gang violence in his native Honduras.

Rolanda Byrd, whose 24-year-old son Akiel Denkins was killed by a white police officer in Southeast Raleigh, spoke at a vigil on Friday.
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

Demonstrations over this week’s fatal shootings in Dallas, Minnesota and Louisiana spread to North Carolina on Friday, with gatherings in Raleigh, Fayetteville and Winston-Salem and one group calling on easier access to police body camera footage.

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

A three judge panel at the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down two General Assembly redistricting measures. The ruling caught lawmakers at a chaotic time, as they’re holding closed-door meetings to consider changes to House Bill 2, while trying to adjourn for the year, prior to the July 4th weekend.

The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

A panel of federal judges heard arguments Tuesday over North Carolina’s controversial voting law at the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

photo of Wildin Acosta
Courtesy of the Acosta family

Earlier this year, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials detained 19-year-old Wildin Acosta as he was leaving his home in Durham.

Acosta has been held in a detention facility for nearly five months while he waits for an immigration hearing. The Corrections Corporation of America says he was recently held in "restrictive housing" for nine days for three alleged citations. CCA says the disciplinary action follows ICE detention standards.

photo of Joe Webster
Efren Renteria

When Joe Webster became an attorney, one of his first cases was a civil rights lawsuit he filed against his hometown of Madison, North Carolina. He successfully argued that it was wrong for the town to deny him, a black man, his own office space in a predominantly white neighborhood.

photo of Wildin Acosta
Courtesy of the Acosta family

Officials at the Stewart Detention Center in Georgia have released an undocumented Durham teenager from restrictive housing after nine days.

A picture of a gavel on a table.
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

A local distributor of Anheuser-Busch products has pulled unauthorized ads using the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina's logo.  Now the tribe is suing the brewer and wholesaler.

Photo: Ryan Gibson (l) and Tabor Winstead at a vigil in downtown Raleigh on Sunday night
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

Across North Carolina, thousands gathered Sunday to mourn the deaths of the victims of the deadliest shooting in U.S. history.

Courtesy of the Hoke County Sheriff's Office

The Fort Bragg Army Reserve officer charged after a series of threatening incidents Thursday night at a mosque in Hoke County is a decorated veteran of two deployments to Iraq, said an Army spokesman.

Photo: A photo identification card issued by FaithAction International
Courtesy of FaithAction International

A North Carolina legislative panel recommended banning police from using non-government issued IDs to verify people’s identity on Wednesday, potentially tossing out an instrument law enforcement uses to identify undocumented immigrants.

Durham County Detention Facility
Ildar Sagdejev (Specious) / Wikimedia

A federal review of the Durham County Detention Facility recommends creating a separate unit for inmates with mental health diagnoses.

Greenville Federal Courthouse
Eastern District of NC, US District Court

Eleven years ago, Mike Easley was North Carolina's governor, the Carolina Hurricanes began with what would be a Stanley Cup season and Apple had yet to unveil the original iPhone to the public. And on December 31st, 2005, North Carolina Eastern District Judge Malcolm Howard assumed senior status, a form of semi-retirement granted to U.S. federal judges.

Since then, Howard’s vacancy has yet to be filled.

photo of "How the Drug War Ruins American Lives" by Art Benavie
Praeger Press

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Comprehensive Crime Control Act. This spurred the "War on Drugs" and allowed the federal government to establish the Assets Forfeiture Fund and bring lawsuits against items of property.

In his new book, How the Drug War Ruins American Lives (Praeger Press/2016), Art Benavie examines how the Assets Forfeiture Fund has eroded American citizens' property rights.

Durhamites gathered at the LGBTQ Center to write letters.
Rebecca Martinez / WUNC

Nearly a dozen people are hunched over a long table at the LGBTQ Center of Durham on a recent evening.

They're scrawling hopeful sentiments on brightly-colored pieces of paper. The letters of support are headed to six young men arrested in North Carolina in targeted immigration enforcement actions in January.

Fayetteville Police Try a New Approach to Drug Crimes

May 18, 2016
A stamp of heroin.
Psychonaught / Wikipedia

When Fayetteville launches its Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program this fall, it will be the first city in the South to try a new approach to policing drug crimes.

Pages