Law

Luis Padilla poses for a picture with his daughter, Isabella near their home in New York. Padilla was arrested at 16 and sent to Rikers Island. New York and North Carolina are the only two states to prosecute all 16 and 17 year olds as adults.
Seth Wenig / Associated Press

Second of two stories. Click here for the first.

North Carolina is one of just two states that automatically charges 16- and 17-year-olds as adults in the criminal justice system. But in several counties, the court system is working with local law enforcement to give would-be young offenders a second chance.

Durham County Detention Facility
Ildar Sagdejev (Specious) / Wikimedia

Local activists are raising concerns about Durham County Sheriff’s Office plans to implement video visitation at the jail.

a young man holding a pride flag
Emma / Flickr, Creative Commons

LGBTQ people face a high risk of physical and sexual violence and harassment, according to Triangle-based nonprofit research institute RTI International.

Image of bathroom sign
The LEAF Project / Flickr Creative Commons

The North Carolina plaintiffs fighting House Bill 2 in federal court face more legal uncertainty after Monday's U.S. Supreme Court decision.

Captain Raheem Aleem has been appointed Hispanic community liaison at the Durham County Sheriff's Office.
Courtesy of Durham County Sheriff's Office

The Durham County Sheriff's Office has announced the appointment of a new Hispanic community liaison.

An image of Principal Chief Patrick Lambert
Holly Kays / Smoky Mountain News

Earlier this month, the Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee voted 9-3 to begin the impeachment process for Principal Chief Patrick Lambert. The vote exposes divisions rippling through the tribe’s governing body.

In January, the tribe’s Office of Internal Audit completed an investigation into contracts and human resources proceedings within Lambert’s administration. Members of the Tribal Council who voted for impeachment have used the results of the investigation as support for impeachment.

An image of Abdullah Khadra and his family
Abdullah Khadra

Abdullah Khadra and his family are originally from Syria and currently live in Raleigh on religious worker visas. Last fall, Khadra and his family traveled to Lebanon for a family emergency. But while they were there, the visa expired for Khadra’s three-year old daughter Muna.

Now, Khadra and his wife are struggling to get their daughter on a plane back to the U.S. and they are having difficulty because of President Trump’s executive order.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Khadra about his family’s struggle to bring their daughter back to North Carolina.

Image of young black kids in Chicago with a police officer.
Patricia Evans

In the mid ‘90s, writer Jamie Kalven became immersed in Stateway Gardens, an impoverished and embattled public housing community on the South Side of Chicago.

Anb image of protestors at Columbia University
Frank Franklin II / AP Photo

President Trump’s travel ban on immigrants and refugees from seven countries last week left thousands of international students on college campuses feeling uncertain about their futures. Officials at universities in North Carolina continue to reassure international students of their security, but the ban’s effect remains uncertain.

More than 17,000 students currently enrolled in the U.S. are from the countries included in the travel ban, and many university officials worry that the new immigration policy will harm recruitment of international students in the future.

Yazmin Garcia Rico

During his campaign, Donald Trump said he would eliminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The program, also known as DACA, was put in place in 2012 by the Obama administration. It allows young adults who came to the United States without documentation as children to receive a two-year renewable protection from deportation, a work permit, and a Social Security number.
 

Sign at the U.S. Border
Makaristos via Creative Commons

President Donald Trump signed an executive order ordering a wall along the 2,000 mile Mexican border.

He claims Mexico will pay for it, but Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto says otherwise. He canceled his trip to the U.S. where he was scheduled to meet with President Trump.

Host Frank Stasio talks with KJZZ Mexico City senior field correspondent Jorge Valencia about the latest.

A drawing of Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

This week, the Criminal podcast tells the story of how a juvenile detention center breathed life into a dying Mississippi town. That facility later became the most violent prison in the state.

Host Phoebe Judge says Walnut Grove, Mississippi, is a small town about an hour from the state capitol. It's always had economic problems, but it was buoyed by a manufacturing industry until those dried up during the Recession. That's when the state built a juvenile detention facility there in 2001.

A young adult looking confused at a laptop.
CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/7658225516

Young people who were in foster care on their 18th birthday may now apply to stay in the system until age 21. Before the General Assembly approved expansion last year, foster kids aged out at 18 unless they were in college full time. The expansion became effective with the new year.

Todd Turner

When Sherrill Roland was in his last year of graduate school at UNC-Greensboro, he was charged for crimes he did not commit in the District of Columbia. 

An image of former UNC housekeepers Barbara Prear and Marsha Tinne
Charlie Shelton-Ormond / WUNC

On November 26, 1996, a group of housekeepers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill settled a lawsuit with the university that provided the workers with increased wages, improved career training and education programs and more transparent communication with university administrators.

The settlement was the culmination of a movement led by the UNC Housekeeper's Association. The group's efforts follow a legacy of activism by workers at UNC-CH.

Protesters marched through uptown Wednesday night after the Mecklenburg County district attorney announced no charges in the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Amid the anger, there was also a conversation between a demonstrator and a police officer who have both become familiar faces at protests.

Image of Attica uprising
ASSOCIATED PRESS/ New York State Special Commission on Attica

Forty-five years ago, New York state police raided Attica Prison, a maximum-security institution in a small town in upstate New York. The standoff and takeover led to the deaths of 39 men in what has become known as the "Attica Prison Uprising." Scholar and historian Heather Ann Thompson considers the uprising to be both one of the most important civil rights events of the 20th century and a pivotal moment in criminal justice history.

A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

A North Carolina prosecutor says a Charlotte police officer acted lawfully when he shot and killed a black man in a case that touched off several nights of unrest in the city.

A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

Updated 10:15 a.m. 11/23/2016

A Durham man was shot and killed by Durham Police Tuesday in a neighborhood east of N.C. Central University.

Frank Clark, 34, died after what Durham Police officials described as a "struggle."

a sample police body cam
Utility, Inc. / Flickr, Creative Commons

In an effort to increase police accountability, the Durham City Council has approved a plan to spend $1.4 million dollars to outfit police officers with body cameras for the next five years.

Image of Reginald Newberne, a former North Carolina State Trooper, against a brick wall.
Laura Pellicer

A former North Carolina State trooper won a $3.75 million verdict in a long-running whistleblower case. State trooper Reginald Newberne claims that in 2000, a fellow officer told Newberne he injured his hand while punching a teen suspect. Newberne says he was hesitant about filling out an official report, but he later offered a detailed account of the incident to his superiors. Newberne was subsequently fired from his position in the Highway Patrol for a violation of the “truthfulness directive”.
 

Greensboro Police Department

Guilford County prosecutors will not bring criminal charges against a white officer who aggressively attacked a black man. Greensboro City Council members repeatedly called for prosecutors to review the initial investigation. Dejuan Yourse was on his mother's front porch when he was punched in the face, wrestled to the ground, and subsequently arrested by Officer Travis Cole.  

Durham County Jail
Laura Candler

The Durham County Sheriff's office has received more than $275,000 in federal and local funding to improve mental health services for inmates at the Durham County Detention Facility.

UNC linebacker Allen Artis (second from left) with his attorney Kerry Sutton (far left) and parents Johnny and Stephanie Artis.
Jess Clark / WUNC

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Linebacker Allen Artis stood on the steps of the Orange County courthouse with his lawyer and family Thursday morning and maintained he did not rape a fellow UNC student earlier this year.

Pages