Education

Credit CPB

Two of North Carolina’s private institutions of higher education are partnering with a non-profit chain of charter schools.

Dave DeWitt: Duke University and Davidson College are entering into an agreement with the KIPP schools. KIPP, short for Knowledge is Power Program, is a network of charter schools operating in 20 states. There are currently 2 KIPP schools in North Carolina, in Charlotte and Gaston. They are open enrollment charter schools, with an emphasis on preparing low-income students for college.

Experts and educators are coming together today to discuss an economic transformation for Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Leoneda Inge:  The down economy has not been kind to higher education and Historically Black Colleges and Universities, or HBCUs have suffered even more. Andrea Harris is president of the North Carolina Institute of Minority Economic Development.  She has invited black college leaders and the head of the White House Initiative on HBCUs to debate the financial survival of these institutions.

Education leaders in Guilford County are looking at how private donations would affect public schools.

Jeff Tiberii: A group of parents at one Greensboro Elementary School wants to go beyond the average book or bake sale. They’re hoping to raise $1.5 million for a new building. School board members are considering both sides of an issue that would likely provide some schools with more private money than others. Chairman of the board Alan Duncan:

Peter Hans
Nelson Mullins Law Firm

The UNC system has a new chair for its Board of Governors.

Dave DeWitt: Peter Hans is a UNC-Chapel Hill graduate and a former advisor to 3 U.S. Senators, most recently Republican Richard Burr. Now, he’s the chair of the UNC system’s Board of Governors, with oversight over all 17 member campuses. Hans represents a political shift on the Board. The job has typically been held by Democrats. UNC System President Tom Ross says politics won’t be a factor moving forward.

Poetic Justice P.S.: American Graduate Part 3

Jun 15, 2012

Graduation ceremonies are pretty much done but we have a P.S. for you, A poetic P.S. As part of WUNC's participation in the American Graduate Project, we commissioned slam poets Kane Smego and Will McInnerney to host an after-school writing workshop at Northern High School in Durham. And they did- for ten weeks. They're here to tell the stories of two young people who grabbed onto words and held tight.

The Chapel Hill - Carrboro school district will get its first magnet school school in 2013. But not all parents are happy about it.

Dave DeWitt: The Chapel Hill - Carrboro School Board voted 5 to 1 to turn Frank Porter Graham Elementary into a magnet school. It will offer a Spanish-English Dual Language program.

Some parents at Frank Porter Graham had opposed the change. Parents at other schools that will lose their dual language programs also fought the decision.

WUNC is a part of the American Graduate Project. It's a public media initiative looking at the drop out crisis across the country. As a part of this project we commissioned slam poets Kane Smego and Will McInnerney to teach a writing workshop at Northern High School in Durham. Over the last 10 weeks, Kane and Will taught a group of students how to use poetry to tell their own stories. Today is graduation day at Northern and three of the students from our workshop will be receiving their diplomas.

Eleven colleges and universities, big and small, public and private, are teaming up today to form the Eastern North Carolina Consortium for Higher Education.

Asma Khalid: There's a saying that "collaboration is king."

And Jim Gray believes it. He uses that phrase a lot when talking about this new plan.

Gray is the president of North Carolina Wesleyan College. He's also leading the consortium.

Tens of thousands of high school seniors will graduate this week across North Carolina. In a few months, many will start college. Not only will that be the next step in their educational lives, but also the end of a college search process that, for some, took years. It’s a process that has gotten more and more complicated, both for students and for the people who read the college applications. The rapid expansion in the number of high schools in the state is having unintended consequences in college admissions.

The State Legislature has reversed course on how many low-income four-year olds are eligible for pre-kindergarten programs.

Dave DeWitt: As part of its effort to cut costs and streamline pre-k programs in the state, the Legislature last year appeared to cap the number of low-income kids at 20 percent. Proponents of Pre-K programs brought the case before Judge Howard Manning, who ruled that the law was unconstitutional. He ordered the state to admit all eligible at-risk four-year olds.

Walking Classroom
Walking Classroom

A Chapel Hill non-profit has been recognized nationally for developing a program that targets childhood obesity while helping students learn.  The program is called “The Walking Classroom.”

Leoneda Inge:  The Walking Classroom Institute is about one year old and was started by former 5th grade teacher Laura Fenn.

Laura Fenn:  What I did is one day, when I was home after school, I went out for a walk and I was listening to a podcast while I was walking and I thought to myself, my students can do this.

American Graduate: Poetic Justice Part 1

Jun 1, 2012
Poetic Justice visit WUNC.
WUNC

WUNC is part of the American Graduate Project. It’s a public media initiative looking at education and the drop out crisis in North Carolina. It’s a big issue, by some measurements, an estimated 1-in-4 high school students will drop out before graduation day. As a part of this project WUNC commissioned slam poets Kane Smego and Will McInnerney to host an after-school writing workshop at Northern High School in Durham. Today we begin a series of poetic reflections on their classroom experience.

NC Gets NCLB Waiver

May 30, 2012

North Carolina is one of eight states that have been granted a waiver from some of the most significant requirements of the education law "No Child Left Behind."

Republican Senate leader Phil Berger introduced an education reform package to lawmakers today. Capitol Bureau Chief Jessica Jones reports if passed, it would cost 440 million dollars over five years.

Jessica Jones: Berger explained the legislation earlier today in a committee meeting. It has attracted controversy because it would end teacher tenure, to the chagrin of some educators. Berger says bad teachers should be weeded out. The measure would also require evaluations of all entering kindergarten students.

Friday Improving

May 18, 2012
Bill Friday
UNC-TV

Bill Friday's condition is improving. But the former UNC system president still remains in critical condition at UNC Hospitals.

The Orange County District Attorney has asked the State Bureau of Investigation to look into the activities of a UNC-Chapel Hill professor. Julius Nyang'Oro is accused of being paid for classes he did not teach.

Thousands of graduating seniors will get their degrees this weekend. The three largest universities in the Triangle: Duke, NC State, and UNC Chapel Hill, all hold commencement ceremonies.

Dave DeWitt: Last-minute preparations are ongoing for the big events, including building stages, arranging chairs, and families checking into hotel rooms.

But for those graduating, like Mohammad Saad at UNC Chapel Hill, these last few days elicit conflicting emotions.

An academic department at UNC-Chapel Hill is under fire after a scathing internal report discovered numerous no-show classes and grade changes from 2007 to 2009.

The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned a lower-court ruling that dealt with student assignment in Pitt County Schools. The 4th Circuit said the school district that serves the Greenville area did not adequately consider race when drawing attendance boundaries.

Dave DeWitt: Pitt County is one of a handful of school districts in North Carolina that is still under a federal desegregation order from the 1970s. As such, any major changes it makes to student assignment must consider race.

Students in Wake County Schools who seek technical skills that could lead to jobs may soon have a new school to consider. The Wake School Board has approved the creation of a new career technical high school.

Dave DeWitt: The Career Technical High School would be a partnership with Wake Technical Community College. It would offer classes and certificates in areas like automobile repair, biopharmaceuticals and cosmetology.

UNC Hospital School
UNC Hospital School

Among the vast, winding hallways inside the UNC Hospital complex, there’s a school. It's small, by public school standards, but it serves a vital purpose.

As Dave DeWitt reports, it offers young patients the chance to remain students, and retain a sense of normalcy during a difficult time in their lives.

Loretta Rowland-Kitley
Jeff Tiberii

North Carolina had a high school graduation rate that ranked 25th in the nation last year. The state statistics are showing improvement, but still about 27 out of every 100 students do not receive their diploma on time. Of all the large and urban school districts in the state, Guilford County has the best graduation rate. Part of the reason is a growing number of the district's early and middle colleges. Students at those schools are now earning degrees at a near perfect pace. Jeff Tiberii reports as part of our American Graduate series.

A possible change to how university employees are classified has the UNC system and employee rights groups bickering.

Dave DeWitt: About 22,000 employees who work on the UNC system’s 17 campuses are classified in one of two categories. EPA employees are exempt from the state personnel act, SPA employees are not.

The UNC Board of Governors wants to streamline, and create one category. They say it will allow more local control and create a system that rewards the best employees and allows universities more flexibility in recruitment.

Roy Dawson
UNC-Chapel Hill

Dropping out of high school is usually a lifelong ticket to a low-paying job, or worse. As more and more businesses require employees to have at least a high-school degree, those who do not are getting left behind. In response, public schools, community colleges, and universities are creating new ways for drop-outs to re-enter the education system. As part of our American Graduate series, Dave DeWitt tells the story of a student who found one of these new roads to success.

Dave DeWitt: School always came easy to Roy Dawson.

The second-largest school district in North Carolina is close to choosing a new leader. The search for a new superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools enters a public phase this week.

Pages