Education

This section collects Education stories from WUNC News & other sources.

classroom
Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

A Raleigh mother is raising money to open a high school in Wake County designed specifically for students overcoming addiction.

Teacher in classroom with students.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/auPuAq

An omnibus education bill titled "Various Changes to Education Laws" emerged from a legislative committee Wednesday. Senators added a number of provisions to an existing bill that was originally only about cursive writing, multiplication tables and advanced math classes.

A sign in front of West Lumberton Elementary, the only Robeson County school that remains closed a year after Hurricane Matthew. The storm dumped about three feet of standing water into the building, and destroyed many of its students' homes.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

A Robeson County elementary school damaged by Hurricane Matthew will close for good. The decision came after a group of parents pleaded to keep it open.

State Superintendent of Public Schools Mark Johnson
NC Public Schools

The North Carolina Supreme Court released a ruling Friday over who is in charge of running the state’s public schools: the State Schools Superintendent or the State Board of Education. After the decision was unveiled, both sides claimed victory.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

More North Carolina teachers have responded to a working conditions survey than ever before. The results reveal 40 percent of participants don't believe class sizes are conducive to meeting the needs of all students.

The entrance to the Wake County Public Schools administration office.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

North Carolina's highest court says legislators can shift substantial control over public schools that educate 1.5 million students to the elected superintendent.

During the last week before EOG testing, third grader Eleanor raises her hand to answer a word problem in her classroom at Smith Elementary School in Burlington.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Third graders at Smith Elementary School in Burlington took a break from class on a recent Friday afternoon to reflect on what school had been like lately.

Fayetteville math teacher Kenneth Williams creates a life-sized right triangle in his classroom.
Jess Clark / WUNC

A new proposal to expand access to advanced math classes in public schools is moving quickly through the General Assembly.

Charter School Creation For 4 Towns Gets Final Approval

Jun 6, 2018
photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

For the first time, North Carolina municipalities now have the authority to apply for and to operate charter schools after the General Assembly gave final approval Wednesday to the measure.

Several hands of different colors raised.
John LeMasney / Creative commons

A controversial charter school bill passed in the General Assembly on Wednesday. The bill would allow four municipalities outside Charlotte to run their own charter schools.

Chandler White works on spelling words. White, 8, receives the Opportunity Scholarship voucher to attend a private school.
Lynn Hey / For WUNC

A research team that studied the test results of students in the state’s largest voucher program say a far more rigorous evaluation of the program and its outcomes for students is needed.   

Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

For many students with disabilities, going to the movie theater can be a scary experience. The blaring sounds and contrast of bright lights in a pitch-black room can be overstimulating for children with sensory-related disabilities like autism. So many theaters now offer occasional, "sensory-friendly" film screenings to make movie-going easier for all kids.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

The state Senate on Thursday debated a controversial bill to allow four local governments to create their own charter schools. The bill applies to the towns of Cornelius, Matthews, Huntersville and Mint Hill - and as a local bill is not subject to veto.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

Guilford County Schools will be the second school system in the nation to have an Urdu-English dual language program. The program will also be the first in North Carolina.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

A state senate committee has approved a bill giving four North Carolina communities the power to create their own charter schools. Critics say the legislation would re-segregate public schools in those areas.

A sign indicates a no-student drop-off zone with Wake County public school buses in the background.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

Following months of planning after the school shooting massacre in Parkland, Florida, Republican leaders in the North Carolina General Assembly announced $35 million will be earmarked for new school safety measures.

Harry Smith, center, was elected as the new UNC Board of Governors chairman.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

The panel that oversees North Carolina's public universities is changing leadership.

The University of North Carolina Board of Governors on Thursday elected Greenville businessman Harry Smith as chairman.

School shootings since 2013
Moms Demand Action

Creating a legal method to compel someone to temporarily surrender their guns if they're a danger to themselves or others is a common-sense way to prevent mass shootings and suicides, North Carolina Democratic legislators and gun-control advocates said Tuesday.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

Former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer has given $20 million to College Advising Corps.

The Chapel Hill-based organization places advisers in high schools to help first-generation and underrepresented students navigate their way to college.

In this May 12, 2017, photo, registered nurse Samantha Marz checks a student at Rundle elementary school in Las Vegas.
John Locher / AP

North Carolina could get new standards for staffing school nurses, if a new proposal goes forward.

Delven Mearis of Durham Public Schools rallied as small crowd waited for busloads of teachers to arrive ahead of the march.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

As they packed up their protest signs and returned to the classroom to finish out the school year, thousands of teachers in North Carolina turned their attention to a different fight: The midterm elections.

Participants make their way towards the Legislative Building during a teachers rally at the General Assembly. Thousands of teachers rallied the state capital seeking a political showdown over wages and funding for public school classrooms.
Gerry Broome / AP

Thousands of North Carolina educators mounted a historic demonstration outside the state Capitol Wednesday as lawmakers arrived for the start of a short session. While the halls in many of the state's schools were quiet, the streets of downtown Raleigh thundered with voices of teachers and their supporters.

Supporters of raising pay for teachers began to march in downtown Raleigh on Wednesday morning.
James Morrison / WUNC

Thousands of North Carolina teachers march through the streets of Raleigh on Wednesday to call for higher pay and for more resources for their students. The march is part of the wave of educator-led activism across the nation in backlash to federal and state-level education budget cuts.

headshot of chancellor cummings
Courtesy of UNCP

Retired surgeon and former state Medicaid Director Robin Gary Cummings took office as chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2015. Cummings is a Pembroke native and member of the Lumbee Tribe. His tenure has been marked by efforts to expand economic and educational opportunities for residents of Robeson County, which has one of the highest poverty rates in the country.

Educators filed into the General Assembly building Wednesday as lawmakers gaveled in the 2018 session
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Eight-year-old Chandler White, who struggles with dyslexia, attends The Piedmont School, a non-profit specializing in teaching students with learning disabilities.
Lynn Hey / For WUNC

Eight-year-old Chandler White is a bright-eyed, happy third grader, alternating Tae Kwon Do and spelling homework in his dining room with his mom.

He says he "really, really likes" his new school, The Piedmont School, a private school in High Point.

But, he used to hate going to school. It's the kind of thing a lot of kids say from time to time, but Chandler was really struggling, said his mom, Kara White.

Kitchen worker Nancy Martinez serves breakfast at an elementary cafeteria in Chandler, Arizona during a teacher strike there. North Carolina teachers are walking in AZ teachers' footsteps with protests this Wednesday.
Matt York / AP

A total of 38 school districts will be closed for classes Wednesday while thousands of teachers march to the Capitol to call for better school funding. Some schools will hold an optional workday, with limited operations. That means many hourly employees, like cafeteria workers or bus drivers, could miss out on a day of work.

A sign indicating a teacher work area inside a public school in Wake County.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

The recent wave of teacher activism sweeping through conservative, tax-cutting states has washed into North Carolina, where educators have pledged to fill the streets and bring their demands for better pay and school resources to legislators' doorstep.

classroom
Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

Nearly 40 school districts in North Carolina will close schools on Wednesday, May 16. That is the opening day for the legislative session, and thousands of teachers from around the state plan to protest in Raleigh for better pay and working conditions. The demonstration comes as teachers strike and walk out in other states around the country, like Arizona, West Virginia, and Kentucky.

From left to right, Eddie, Natalie and Maria Fernanda Cortes, seated outside Mount Pisgah Academy, a private Seventh-Day Adventist academy near Asheville, where the two sisters will attend school in Fall 2018.
Courtesy of Heidy Cortes Gomez

It was Saturday morning, and that meant the Cortes family was at church. They are faithful Seventh-day Adventists. Eleven-year-old Eddie played the piano to start the service.

His father, Eddie Sr. sat in the first church pew, next to Mafer, 15, and Natalie, 13, who leaned on their mom, Heidy.

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