Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Actresses in 'The Women'
Courtesy of Lyman Collins

In 1936 Claire Boothe Luce wrote a play about New York socialites that reflected her own high-society life. Claire was the second wife of media mogul Henry Luce. “The Women” satirizes the role of women in society and their reliance on men. 

Beauty Queens, the LBJ Library, and Holdups

Aug 2, 2017
Sarah Bird

Tricia Coburn attends Miss Macy’s Charm School and eventually lands a modeling gig.

Sara Bird finds solace from heartbreak as a librarian at the LBJ LIbrary. 

John Lincoln is robbed twice while working the front desk of a hotel.

NOTE: When offensive or FCC-prohibited words appear, they are bleeped and listed in the Content Advisory.  Sensitive content will be given an on-air caution and will be noted here in the description.  

Cast of 'Girls Trip'
Donald Traill/Invision/AP / AP - 2017

The comedy “Girls Trip” is a standout success from this summer’s blockbuster season. The movie is about four best friends who take a wild and raunchy trip to New Orleans, and since its release last month, it has faired well with both audiences and critics. Meanwhile rapper Jay-Z released his highly-anticipated album “4:44” at the end of June. 

The Tenth Muse: Judith Jones celebrates a life in food

Aug 2, 2017

The power behind a great book isn't solely with its author; great books have great editors. In the early 1960s, Judith Jones wasn't even working in the world of food writing when she happened across a book proposal from Julia Child. Child's book had been refused by other publishers, but Jones saw something very special in it. That book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, went on to become essential reading for cooks all over the world.

Behind the cookbook: the art of editing with Judith Jones

Aug 2, 2017

Judith Jones is the cookbook editor's editor. Jones was instrumental in discovering and publishing Julia Child's first book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, more than 50 years ago. In the process, she changed the American cookbook forever. The cookbook authors with whom Jones worked have become a who's who of the food world. In April 2006, Judith Jones talked with Lynne Rossetto Kasper about the collaborative process of crafting beautiful, engaging cookbooks. [Ed.

Cover of 'Flood'
Courtesy of Melissa Scholes Young

Author Melissa Scholes Young is from Hannibal, Missouri, the city where writer Mark Twain lived as a child. The town is rooted in the mythology of Twain, and for Scholes Young it was the perfect place to set her first novel. 

Courtesy of Chris Holaday

Eastern North Carolina’s Tobacco State League only lasted for five seasons. From 1946 to 1950 teams including the Sanford Spinners and the Lumberton Auctioneers battled for baseball greatness and ticket sales. They entertained crowds eager for a return to normalcy after World War II. Many of the players had recently returned from war, others were college baseball stars, and still others were just hoping to make a better hourly wage than they could earn in the local mills.

The roots of Zoe's Ghana Kitchen

Aug 1, 2017

In an extended interview with host Francis Lam, chef Zoe Adjonyoh recalls her childhood fascination with the food from her father's home country - Ghana. She and Francis also discuss her personal travels to the West African nation in search of more experience with the methods and unique ingredients used in Ghanaian cuisine, and how it all comes together in her debut cookbook Zoe's Ghana Kitchen.

The Roots of Zoe's Ghana Kitchen

Aug 1, 2017

In an extended interview with host Francis Lam, chef Zoe Adjonyoh recalls her childhood fascination with the food from her father's home country - Ghana. She and Francis also discuss her personal travels to the West African nation in search of more experience with the methods and unique ingredients used in Ghanaian cuisine, and how it all comes together in her debut cookbook Zoe's Ghana Kitchen.

Corolla Beach
Thomas Wheeler / AltAdjust.com

Thomas Wheeler has always had a knack for eye-hand coordination, especially in the age of video games.

“Controlling a drone is almost like a dance to me," said Wheeler, 32, who focuses on capturing images – from the sky. "Imagine for a second you could put your eyes anywhere in the sky.”

WUNC Youth Podcast: Hey Al Letson, What is News?!

Jul 30, 2017

What is News?

In this episode we have the host of  Reveal, Al Letson, with us. Al tells us:

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Douglas, Emerald

Warren Haynes is a singer-songwriter perhaps best-known for being a longtime guitarist in the Allman Brothers Band. He’s also a founding member of the jam band, Gov’t Mule. The group recently released their 10th studio album, “Revolution Come… Revolution Go.” In the audio above, listen as he tells a story of sharing a tour bus from New York City to Denver with Dave Grohl’s mom, Virginia, shortly after the tragedy.

Jonathan Byrd

Growing up in Chapel Hill, Jonathan Byrd never thought he could make a career out of playing music. But some soul-searching after a stint in the U.S. Navy and a series of disappointing jobs led him to question why he was forcing himself into doing things he wasn’t good at and didn’t love. Jonathan began touring and performing his original songs, folksy ballads infused with bluegrass-style flat-picking and classic rock foundations. With “Pickup Cowboy” Johnny Waken, the duo aims first and foremost to put on a great show that will energize the audience. 

Sound Opinions: Penelope Spheeris

Jul 27, 2017

Penelope Spheeris has directed some of the most influential movies about music of all time, from Wayne's World to all three installments of The Decline of Western Civilization films. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot talk with Penelope about the 25th anniversary of Wayne's World, her fascinating path as a director, and the legacy of her films. Plus, a review of the new album from Arcade Fire.

In Texas, women with limited access to abortions are traveling across the border to find a drug that will induce miscarriages. In Mississippi, anti-abortion groups are opening crisis pregnancy centers across from abortion clinics to persuade women to keep their babies. And one company offers permanent birth control through the insertion of a simple device – that’s ended up causing health complications for thousands of women. This week, we look into pregnancy and the ways people try to prevent it, end it and save it.

Jeff Myers rides a wave in Rodanthe in 2012
Chris Bickford / Chris Bickford

Photographer Chris Bickford has traveled the world and soaked in different landscapes and cultures, but there is a special kind of serenity he only finds at the North Carolina shore. For more than a decade, Bickford has lived in the Outer Banks taking pictures of the region's shifting sands and close-knit surfing community. He's gathered a collection of black and white photographs in a new book called “Legends of the Sandbar” (Burn Magazine/2017). 

Cover of Coconut, Ginger, Shrimp, Rum cookbook
Brigid Washington / Skyhorse Publishing 2017

Brigid Washington grew up with the Caribbean flavors of her family's native Trinidad. Ginger, coconut, fresh seafood and other ingredients shaped her palate and her experiences in the kitchen.

But food was not an important part of her adult life until, as a dissatisfied writer living in Raleigh, she felt compelled to walk into the kitchen of Bloomsbury Bistro and ask the chef to teach her the culinary arts. That brazen request led to culinary school and a cookbook. “Coconut. Ginger. Shrimp. Rum.: Caribbean Flavors for Every Season” (Skyhorse Publishing/2017) highlights the mainstay flavors of the islands with American fusion twists. 

Where We Belong

Jul 27, 2017
Vin Shambry
Photo by Christian Leonard

Vin Shambry goes to outdoor school and feels like a kid again.

Lauren Weedman meets her biological mother.

Michelle Oberholtzer sets up a fund to help families fight home foreclosure.

Flora Diaz becomes attached to the subjects of a middle school science project.

Bill T Jones
Bill T. Jones

Legendary dancer and choreographer Bill T. Jones was inspired to create his dance trilogy “Analogy” after reading W. G. Sebald’s novel “The Emigrants.” The book, like Jones’s resulting oeuvre, deals with issues of persecution, trauma, war and memory.

On paper, steak frites seem so simple. As its French name implies, it is just steak and fries. But, to get the two components cooked right and served hot – at the exact same moment – is a feat in itself. Thankfully, our friends at America’s Test Kitchen have fine-tuned the timeline for making the dish in your home kitchen. Tucker Shaw is executive editor of Cook’s Country magazine. Managing producer Sally Swift discussed the process with him, and got his recipe for Easy Steak Frites.

stars at night
Jeremy Nicholson / Flickr - Creative Commons

Listening to audio is something we often do alone, whether it is in the car on the way to or from work or through a set of earbuds during an evening run. But people in Durham have another option for listening to audio stories with an event series called "Audio Under The Stars,” which gives adults permission to partake in their own kind of storytime. The events take place summer evenings on the lawn of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The series is now in it's fourth season.

MPR News® presents The Splendid Table® — Live, October 12, 2017 at 7:00 PM The Fitzgerald Theater, St. Paul, MN   Please join us for an evening of conversation, stories and musical interludes hosted by Francis Lam honoring the indisputable queen of food radio, Lynne Rosetto Kasper. The year 2018 marks a bittersweet milestone for The Splendid Table and its cofounder and longtime host Lynne Rosetto Kasper.

WUNC Youth Radio Podcast
Kimani Hall / WUNC

What is News?

 

In this episode Los Angeles Hip-Hop Artist, De'Wayne Jackson says,  

"I feel like at times hip-hop can be news for a lot of kids. We just have to continue to give our voices to the world and hope the kids that are listening can make a change."

What is news? 

In this episode we also ask Katherine Gan "Can hip-hop be news?"

Kyle Mooney Solves A Few First-World Problems

Jul 21, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Brendan Francis Newnam: Each week, you send in your questions about how to behave, and here to answer them this time is Kyle Mooney.

You know him as a cast member on “Saturday Night Live,” the movie “Zoolander 2,” and he’s now starring in a film he created with an old writing partner called, “Brigsby Bear.”

He plays James, a man who is kidnapped as a baby, isolated from society, and given essentially one piece of entertainment to consume: a homemade kids TV show called “Brigsby Bear.” And, yes, it’s a comedy, mostly.

kuso3.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

Steven Ellison – aka “Flying Lotus” – has been blowing people’s minds in multiple mediums since his music debut in 2006. Now he’s moving to the big screen with his debut film, “Kuso.”


Teju-photo-retouched.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

Teju Cole is a true polymath. His novel, “Open City,” won the PEN/Hemingway award. And he writes about photography in a column for The New York Times Magazine, which makes sense since he also exhibits his own photography around the world.

Why You’re Missing Out on Delectable Fish Collars

Jul 21, 2017
IMG_8731.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

So, chances are you’ve heard the phrase nose-to-tail dining, the food movement that encourages eating every part of an animal, not just certain popular cuts. Typically, it’s applied to pigs or cows. But increasingly, restaurants are serving the less popular parts of fish.

Jocelyn Olcott / Oxford University Press - 2017

In 1975 thousands of women from across the world gathered in Mexico City to discuss the state of the feminist movement. The U.N. had declared 1975 “International Women’s Year,” and a governmental conference in Mexico City served as the capstone event. 

Meanwhile, an NGO tribune took place in the city at the same time and drew some of the key leaders in feminism like Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem. The tribune and governmental conference also included women from poorer countries whose views of feminism were often at odds with their American counterparts.

Vagabon Mixes a Chill Playlist that Demands Respect

Jul 21, 2017
vagabon.jpeg
Douglas, Emerald

When Laetitia Tamko, better known by her stage name, Vagabon, was 17, her parents bought her a Fender guitar from Costco and she taught herself how to play by watching instructional DVDs. She soon wrote and released songs on Bandcamp and was invited to play in famous NYC underground venues like Silent Barn.

Che Apalache / Che Apalache

The word ‘che’ is ubiquitous on the streets of Argentina. It is a term of endearment that people use often in casual conversation – similar to a word like buddy in American slang. So when North Carolina native Joe Troop decided to form a band in Buenos Aires with a group of his students, he found it fitting to characterize themselves using the term ‘che.’ The band Che Apalache is comprised of four musicians from three countries who fuse Appalachian folk with Latin American music. 

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