Arts & Culture

The State of Things
11:39 am
Thu September 19, 2013

'Buck' Tells A Poetic Modern Coming-Of-Age Story

Buck: A Memoir by MK Asante
Credit MK Asante / mkasante.com

M.K. Asante grew up in what he calls "Killedelphia," bouncing in and out of schools, hanging out in gangs, and struggling with troubled parents. Discovering a love of writing opened his eyes to new opportunities. His new book, Buck: A Memoir follows his coming-of-age story growing up in Philadelphia (Spiegel & Grau, 2013).

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The State of Things
11:28 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Indian Art Collective Comes To North Carolina

In 1989, Safdar Hashmi was an activist, artist and communist performing a protest play Halla Bol! or "Raise Your Voice!" outside municipal polling places near Delhi, India.

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The State of Things
11:13 am
Tue September 17, 2013

What Young Readers Want

John Claude Bemis is the 2013 Piedmont Laureate for Children's Literature
Credit http://www.piedmontlaureate.com/2013piedmontlaureate/biography.html

Autors John Claude Bemis and Frances O'Roark Dowell talk about writing for young readers

    

John Claude Bemis is the first ever Piedmont Laureate for Children’s Literature.  In the post-Harry Potter age, more critics consider children’s books valuable works of literature with a reach that extends beyond young audiences. 

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The State of Things
12:06 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

The Evolution of the Music of Branford Marsalis

Jazz great Branford Marsalis joins the State of Things to speak about his work.
Credit Palma Kolansky

Host Frank Stasio talks with Branford Marsalis about the evolution of his music

Grammy-award winning artist Branford Marsalis is one of the world’s leading jazz artists. In a career spanning more than three decades, the saxophonist has collaborated with some of the biggest names in music across an array of genres. 

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Arts & Culture
10:14 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Hollerin' Contest Speaks To Old Way Of Communicating

Credit Asma Khalid

If you ever wondered what a holler was, head on out to Spiveys Corner in the southeast part of the state on Saturday. 

The 45th annual National Hollerin' Contest begins at 11 a.m. with farm demonstrations and a fifteen team barbecue cook-off.  Organizers say the hollerin' starts around 4 p.m.  Aaron Jackson is chair of the event.  He says the generations-old practice was not about yelling or screaming, but about communicating.

"People really weren't transient.  You're born in the area and you kind of tended to stay there," Jackson explains.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Youth Radio: How Shyness Can Be A Good Thing

Mashallah Salaam, a 16-year-old high school graduate from Chapel Hill, was a Youth Radio reporter this summer.
Credit WUNC

This summer we worked with a group of young reporters in the WUNC Youth Radio Institute.  They included Mashallah Salaam, a 16 year old high school graduate from Chapel Hill.

I’m someone who has always been labeled as shy. I used to get talked over and brushed off because I’m quiet. Growing up, I never spoke until I knew exactly what I was going to say and how I was going to say it. My mom, Damita Hicks, says it’s because I was around more adults than kids.

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Arts & Culture
3:36 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Eastern NC Chef Vivian Howard Finalist For James Beard Award For 'A Chef's Life'

Vivian Howard owns the restaurant Chef and the Farmer with her husband Ben Knight.
Credit Vivian Howard

Working in famous New York City restaurants, Vivian Howard swore she’d never move back to her home state of North Carolina.  Then, in 2005, when she decided to open her restaurant, her family offered financial help with a catch: She had to open the restaurant near her home town.

"I was against it," she remembers.

But Howard and her husband Ben Knight wound up moving to the 20,000-population city of Kinston, N.C., and opened an upscale restaurant.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Preserving Old Time Southern Apples

Not many of Lee Calhoun's trees produce apples anymore, but he still has a productive crab apple tree.
Laura Candler

Lee Calhoun spent the last 35 years searching for heirloom apples in the south. Laura Candler reports.

In the supermarket today, you can find about a dozen kinds of apples. But years ago, there were hundreds and hundreds of varieties grown all over the South. North Carolina native Lee Calhoun once had 3,000 apple trees growing in his backyard in Pittsboro. I visited him there recently and he showed what was left.

“This is a remnant of an old orchard I used to have,” he said. “Most of them are gone now. This is an Orange Cauley, a little bit different from a regular Cauley, and this is a Green River --that’s a Kentucky apple.”

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The State of Things
11:41 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Art Exhibit Marks 25th Anniversary Of The Stone Center

Progressive Youth #1 by Tim Okamura
Tim Okamura

The UNC Stone Center is celebrating 25 years of promoting black scholarship in the Chapel Hill community. The Center’s first exhibit of the season features the portraiture work of Brooklyn-based artist Tim Okamura. "This Story Has Not Yet Been Told…" draws from Brooklyn life, hip-hop culture, and storytelling.

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Arts & Culture
5:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

12 Years After 9/11, A Somber Day Of Service

The 9/11 Memorial in New York City.
Credit ser_is_snarkish / Flickr Creative Commons

North Carolina is marking 12 years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. 

Governor Pat McCrory has ordered all flags to fly at half-staff Wednesday.

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