WUNC Music

WUNC Music is a place for music discovery

Listen to our music stream with the web player at the top of this page, on the WUNC App (iOS or Android), via TuneIn or on our HD2 channel in the Triangle area. 

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A picture of Mike Doughty
Rachelandthecity / Chartroom Media

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

On this episode, Eric Hodge sits down with Mike Doughty to talk about his song "Brian" from the album The Heart Watches While The Brain Burns.

"Brian" is a based on an East African beat, and Doughty goes in depth discussing how his travels to the region influenced his songwriting.

Listen to the episode here:

WUNC's Back Porch Music On The Lawn For 2017

Apr 9, 2017
Back Porch Music on the Lawn Logo
WUNC / American Tobacco

The days are getting longer and the weather's warming up.  It's that time of year again for WUNC's Back Porch Music On The Lawn.

The free outdoor concerts, an annual Triangle tradition, are held beneath the Lucky Strike water tower at American Tobacco Campus in Durham.

We've got eight great shows for your spring and summer Thursday evenings. All shows begin at 6 p.m.

A couple summers ago, Sarah Kinlaw of the Brooklyn indie-rock band SOFTSPOT was on a boat off the coast of North Carolina with her father. A sudden thunderstorm swept in, disrupting the previously calm waters — and inspiring the song "Maritime Law," which appears on SOFTSPOT's new album, Clearing.

Growing up, punk rocker Laura Jane Grace always felt conflicted about gender. She tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that she felt like two "twin souls" were warring inside of her, fighting for control. "I thought that I was quite possibly schizophrenic," she says.

It wasn't until Grace was 19 that she heard the term "transgender" and had a context for what she was feeling. In 2012, at the age of 31, she transitioned from male to female.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time Eric Hodge speaks with Rick Miller of Southern Culture On The Skids about the song "Freak Flag" off of the band's 2016 album The Electric Pinecones.

WUNC Mill Music Sessions At Rocky Mount Mills

Mar 22, 2017
WUNC, Schoolkids Records & Rocky Mount Mills

WUNC has formed a partnership with Schoolkids Records on a new, free concert series at Rocky Mount Mills. In the tradition of the Back Porch Music on the Lawn Series these concerts are designed to both celebrate North Carolina’s rich musical heritage and provide families a fun night out.

Kaia Kater
Polina Mourzina

The birth of the Carolina Chocolate Drops at the 2005 Black Banjo Gathering at Appalachian State University has become the stuff of folk music legend. “Of course it was an academic event,” Dom Flemons notes of the conference, “but it was also based on the idea of confirming that you weren’t the only one out there.” Once launched, the Drops’ music spread like wildfire. With it emerged a new public appreciation of the African American roots of old-time, bluegrass, and country music.

A picture of Sarah Shook
disarmers.com

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

On this episode, Eric Hodge chats with Sarah Shook of Sarah Shook & The Disarmers about her song 'Dwight Yoakam' from the album Sidelong.

Shook says 'Dwight Yoakam' is a song of irony. It tells the tale of a person being left behind not for a famous person, but for someone who can sing like a famous person.

The Austin 100

Mar 1, 2017

Every year, the SXSW Music Festival serves a daunting, days-long feast of sounds from around the world. And once again, NPR Music's Austin 100 is here to distill it all down to a digestible meal of music discovery.

Picked from a playlist that spanned more than a hundred hours, these 100 songs represent a broad and exciting cross-section of SXSW's many highlights. Here's how you can listen:

Here's a look at the top songs WUNC Music is playing in March.

Mondo Cozmo - Shine

Band Of Horses - In A Drawer

Electro-pop duo Sylvan Esso is back with a much-anticipated followup to it's self-titled 2014 debut. The new album is called What Now and includes the jagged new single "Die Young."

We watched more than 6,000 videos. Ten judges weighed in. Now, the 2017 Tiny Desk Contest has a winner.

Jonathan Rado and Sam France were in eighth grade when they first met and began making music together. Their tastes were simple at first — straight-ahead rock songs banged out on drums and guitars in a garage. But a dramatic shift happened when they decided to take a less linear approach to recording their work.

"I got really into buying cheap, cheap instruments on eBay — lots of xylophones and melodicas and kind of useless junk — and that was kind of everywhere," Rado says. "We'd just kind of play for like 30 minutes, and then chop the best bits down to a three-minute song."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GIVE ME A REASON")

IBIBIO SOUND MACHINE: (Singing in Ibibio).

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Dom Flemons, the host of WUNC’s American Songster Radio Podcast, has a role in the new CMT TV series Sun Records, which premieres tonight (Thursday 2/23) at 10 PM on CMT.  

Cowboy Songs: American Songster Radio Podcast Episode 9

Feb 21, 2017
Dom Flemons, 2nd from left, with Brian Farrow, Cowboy Celtic, Sourdough Slim and Robert Armstrong
Vania Marie Kinard

What makes a song a folk song, anyway?

One familiar answer is that a folk song is a song without an author. Folk song scholars even have a name for the theory that some songs emerge without any one person composing them. They call it "communal creation."

Alison Krauss and Buddy Cannon go way back. Cannon, a veteran country songwriter and producer, remembers hiring Krauss to sing harmonies on one of hear after hearing on of her early demos on cassette in the early '90s. "I've been blown away ever since," Cannon says.

Krauss has a new album out called Windy City. Produced by Cannon, it is her first solo album in 18 years. She says her friend's instincts are almost always right.

A 1960s cult favorite is back: The Shaggs are going to be performing in June at Wilco's Solid Sound Festival in North Adams, Massachusetts.

The Collection

The Collection started out as a Greensboro-based group with 15 members rotating in as a part of the group’s line up. The collective has now become more of a band with seven concrete members. But the group still sticks to its indie folk roots in it’s upcoming album “Listen to the River.”

A picture of Mike Doughty
Rachelandthecity / Chartroom Media

Rocker Mike Doughty has a new collection of songs called The Heart Watches While The Brain Burns. It's his ninth solo record and his first since leaving his longtime home in Brooklyn for the southern comforts of Memphis.  He recently played at The Cat's Cradle in Carrboro, and came to WUNC for a chat.

You can hear more of Mike's songs on WUNC Music on our HD2 channel, streaming at WUNC.org or through TuneIn.

Following the introduction of two bills into the state Legislature that would legally prohibit transgender Texans from using bathrooms that align with their gender identities, 142 artists — including Ewan McGregor, Amy Poehler, Lady Gaga, Janelle Monae, Talib Kweli, Wilco and Whoopi Goldberg — have co-signed a letter beseeching the state senators and representatives to prevent the bills' passage.

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