Women's Issues

Julienne Alexander / Criminal

  


  

In the 19th century, the weak beer and cider that many Americans were drinking at every meal began to be replaced by distilled liquor: rums and whiskeys with a much higher alcohol content. This created a lot of problems, especially for women. Men began spending a lot of time and money in bars. Many weren't helping out at home, or even buying food. Women all over the country advocated for temperance, but the face of prohibition was a woman named Carrie Nation. Her story is the subject of this week's episode of the Criminal podcast.

A woman screams during a protest in solidarity with the Women's March in Washington at the same time as the U.S. Presidential inauguration, in Brussels on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert / AP

Thousands plan to march in North Carolina for women's rights Saturday.

Events in Charlotte, Greensboro and Raleigh will begin at 10 a.m. and coincide with the Women's March on Washington. That event, expected to draw crowds in the hundreds of thousands, was planned shortly after Donald Trump's presidential victory and takes place during his first official day in office. It has inspired similar marches in hundreds of cities around the country and world.

Sallie Krawcheck has gone from Wall Street executive to leading Ellevate, a women's professional network.
A.E. Fletcher Photography

Note: This is a rebroadcast  

Sallie Krawcheck was once one of the most senior executives on Wall Street with top positions at Smith Barney and Merrill Lynch.

She held her own in a male-dominated industry, but after two public firings from those positions, Krawcheck took a different career path. 

In addition to taking on education initiatives, PAGE encourages girls to produce photography and digital stories.
Madison County Photo Exhibition / carolinapage.org

Rural communities in western North Carolina are in the midst of an economic shift.

The rise and fall of the family farm means places like Madison County are looking for new ways to support themselves. The answer could be in the tech industry. But technology businesses rely on a steady stream of well-educated workers. 

A panel discussion tonight at Duke University, "Rethinking Appalachia," examines ways to develop a high-tech workforce in rural Appalachia.

Sgt. Kristy Rodriguez is sprinting on a treadmill. She's wearing dark green shorts, a matching T-shirt and white sneakers. The pace keeps getting faster.

Rodriguez is at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, taking part in a Marine Corps experiment to determine whether women will be allowed to serve in ground combat units.

"A lot of people think that we can't do it," she says. "I don't think the same."

As she runs, Rodriguez stares at a photo — the iconic shot of Marines planting the American flag at Iwo Jima.

U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro and Secretary Clinton’s Senior Advisor for Innovation Alec Ross working together at TechCamp in Tel Aviv.
Matty Stern/U.S. Embassy Tel Aviv

Forming partnerships and working in a collaborative setting can be difficult.