Weather

Flooding in Chapel Hill on Sunday
Jstn568 / wunderground

Orange County continues to recover from weekend flooding, and officials are trying to secure relief funding for those displaced.

At a news conference today, Chapel Hill officials said close to 130 residences are unlivable due to water damage from weekend rain. It's unclear when, or if, people who lived in those units can go back home.

Several feet of flood waters trap cars on West Franklin St. in Chapel Hill Sunday afternoon.
Bart Smith / Facebook

Residents of Orange and Durham counties are cleaning up after torrential rain led to flood waters several feet deep. 

Officials in Chapel Hill say rescuers evacuated at least 40 people Sunday from flooded homes and vehicles.  They were taken to a Red Cross shelter at Smith Middle School. 

Rain and thunderstorms are predicted for most of North Carolina.
screengrab, ABC News radar

Scattered storms are once again in the forecast for this afternoon. The pattern of late-day thundershowers each day is not so unusual, according to meteorologist Darrin Figursky from the National Weather Service in Raleigh. He says what has been a bit atypical is the amount of widespread rainfall we've gotten as a result of these storms.

"Now a lot of that was probably due to the remnants of Andrea at the beginning of the month, where on one day we got four to five inches," Figursky says.  "So for the month with that in mind, we're running three to four inches above normal for the month. We're only maybe an inch or an inch or an inch and a quarter of being in the top five wettest Junes of all time."

A satellite image of Thursday's storm as it advanced on North Carolina.
National Weather Service, Raleigh / Facebook.com

Power was still out Friday morning for hundreds of thousands of people in North Carolina after severe storms. 

A fast-moving system swept across the state Thursday, knocking down trees and power lines.  Duke Energy Progress says nearly 60,000 people were without power Friday morning in Wake County.  Meteorologist Phil Badgett says damage reports came in quickly Thursday night.

NC Pulls Out Of Drought

Jun 14, 2013
NC Drought
US Drought Monitor

Thanks to recent rainfalls associated with Tropical Storm Andrea, North Carolina is now out of drought or abnormally dry conditions for the first time in three years.

The persistent drought has wreaked havoc on agriculture, affecting apple crops in the western part of the state and corn in the east.

Now, thanks to Tropical Storm Andrea and other rain events this spring, the state is no longer suffering from even the mildest classification of drought condition – abnormally dry or “D-zero” - for the first time in the past three years.

Tropical Storm Andrea as it moved over Florida and toward North Carolina.
noaa.gov / NASA/NOAA

Heavy rain continues Friday morning as Tropical Storm Andrea moves toward North Carolina. 

Flash flood warnings were in effect in the Triangle while the coast remained under a tropical storm warning.  Tornado watches were also in effect for Rocky Mount, Wilson Goldsboro and the surrounding areas. 

Hurricane Ivan
NASA

Forecasters are urging North Carolinians to have an emergency plan for hurricanes before the season starts. 

Hurricane Ivan
NASA

Early forecasts predict an active hurricane season along the Atlantic coast. 

Researchers at Colorado State University expect 18 named storms this year.  They say four of those will likely be major storms at Category 3 or higher. 

William Gray, a professor emeritus in Colorado State's atmospheric science department, says this winter's ocean currents follow trends that lead to active storm activity in the tropics.

"This circulation has been especially strong," Gray says.

2010 tornado in Iredell County, NC
England / Flickr

A new tornado app from the American Red Cross is out this week. Available in both English and Spanish, it gives users instant access to local, real-time information on severe weather alerts and warnings. Barry Porter from Triangle Red Cross says it's linked directly to NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The National Weather Service in Raleigh says much of central and western North Carolina are under a hazardous weather outlook for Wednesday.
National Weather Service / noaa.gov

Snow in the forecast Wednesday is a reminder that bad weather can hit North Carolina at any time.  This is severe weather awareness week across the state and officials are urging the public to be prepared.  Meteorologist Nick Petro says a statewide tornado drill will take place Wednesday morning.

A Winter Weather Advisory is in effect until 10 a.m. Friday for the Triangle and Triad areas.
National Weather Service / noaa.gov

The National Weather Service says a winter weather advisory remained in effect for central North Carolina through 10 a.m. Friday.  Forecasters say freezing rain will shift to rain through late morning in the Triangle and Triad.  Meteorologist Nick Petro says temperatures will hover around the freezing mark.

"We're going to have to watch out for local slick spots, mainly on bridges and overpasses first, and as we get to the late morning, temperatures will then rise back above freezing," Petro says.

NC DOT

Triangle areas are experiencing sleet, freezing rain and -- in some parts snow -- as part of a winter weather system quickly passing through.  While the falling precipitation is expected to end this evening, the slick conditions it will leave behind may cause issues for drivers into tomorrow morning.  NC DOT spokeswoman Jennifer Garifo says maintenance employees are planning for long shifts today.

Slushy Day Ahead

Jan 25, 2013
noaa.gov
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for much of central and western North Carolina.  Meteorologist Phil Badgett says snow and sleet could cause slippery road conditions Friday afternoon.

On Tuesday night in Greensboro the temperature is expected to drop into the teens and shelters are expecting to be at or near capacity. Four years ago there was a significant rise in the number of people seeking shelter during the winter months. Greensboro didn’t have enough beds and on many cold nights dozens of people had to sleep on floors. The city responded by opening a half dozen winter emergency shelters for frigid nights like tonight. Reverend Mike Aiken says those facilities opened December 1st and will be packed this week.

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