Tropical Storm Andrea as it moved over Florida and toward North Carolina. / NASA/NOAA

Heavy rain continues Friday morning as Tropical Storm Andrea moves toward North Carolina. 

Flash flood warnings were in effect in the Triangle while the coast remained under a tropical storm warning.  Tornado watches were also in effect for Rocky Mount, Wilson Goldsboro and the surrounding areas. 

Hurricane Ivan

Forecasters are urging North Carolinians to have an emergency plan for hurricanes before the season starts. 

Hurricane Ivan

Early forecasts predict an active hurricane season along the Atlantic coast. 

Researchers at Colorado State University expect 18 named storms this year.  They say four of those will likely be major storms at Category 3 or higher. 

William Gray, a professor emeritus in Colorado State's atmospheric science department, says this winter's ocean currents follow trends that lead to active storm activity in the tropics.

"This circulation has been especially strong," Gray says.

2010 tornado in Iredell County, NC
England / Flickr

A new tornado app from the American Red Cross is out this week. Available in both English and Spanish, it gives users instant access to local, real-time information on severe weather alerts and warnings. Barry Porter from Triangle Red Cross says it's linked directly to NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The National Weather Service in Raleigh says much of central and western North Carolina are under a hazardous weather outlook for Wednesday.
National Weather Service /

Snow in the forecast Wednesday is a reminder that bad weather can hit North Carolina at any time.  This is severe weather awareness week across the state and officials are urging the public to be prepared.  Meteorologist Nick Petro says a statewide tornado drill will take place Wednesday morning.

A Winter Weather Advisory is in effect until 10 a.m. Friday for the Triangle and Triad areas.
National Weather Service /

The National Weather Service says a winter weather advisory remained in effect for central North Carolina through 10 a.m. Friday.  Forecasters say freezing rain will shift to rain through late morning in the Triangle and Triad.  Meteorologist Nick Petro says temperatures will hover around the freezing mark.

"We're going to have to watch out for local slick spots, mainly on bridges and overpasses first, and as we get to the late morning, temperatures will then rise back above freezing," Petro says.


Triangle areas are experiencing sleet, freezing rain and -- in some parts snow -- as part of a winter weather system quickly passing through.  While the falling precipitation is expected to end this evening, the slick conditions it will leave behind may cause issues for drivers into tomorrow morning.  NC DOT spokeswoman Jennifer Garifo says maintenance employees are planning for long shifts today.

Slushy Day Ahead

Jan 25, 2013
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for much of central and western North Carolina.  Meteorologist Phil Badgett says snow and sleet could cause slippery road conditions Friday afternoon.

On Tuesday night in Greensboro the temperature is expected to drop into the teens and shelters are expecting to be at or near capacity. Four years ago there was a significant rise in the number of people seeking shelter during the winter months. Greensboro didn’t have enough beds and on many cold nights dozens of people had to sleep on floors. The city responded by opening a half dozen winter emergency shelters for frigid nights like tonight. Reverend Mike Aiken says those facilities opened December 1st and will be packed this week.

North Carolinians are remembering a paralyzing ice storm that happened 10 years ago today.

About 1-point-8 million people were without power at the storm's height. Residents, businesses and first responders were all at the storm's mercy. Many of them have learned lessons a decade later. Barry Porter of the American Red Cross says mobilizing before any storm is important

Barry Porter: "We have to get our materials and supplies so we partner with government agencies to know which shelters can be opened. Which ones have power ability on their own."

Residents along North Carolina's coast are watching to see what Hurricane Sandy does in the Atlantic.

It's the first day of Spring but it may feel like winter never really settled in. State Climatologist Ryan Boyles says it was the 8th-warmest winter on record in North Carolina and the 6th-driest. He says that's had some up-sides.

Ryan Boyles: Recreation has been much higher this year; people have been able to really get out and enjoy the outdoors this past winter because we've had such mild temperatures. Snow removal costs have been very small this past winter, especially compared to the previous two winters. But there are some negative impacts as well.

Emergency management officials are encouraging businesses and citizens to create safety plans for severe weather.

Jeff Tiberii: Last year North Carolina had 63 tornadoes touch down, more than double the state's annual average. Julia Jarema is with the department of public safety. She says each year there are thousands of severe weather warnings throughout the state. And she adds, knowing what to do before the weather moves through is a critical step:

A warm, mild winter so far may help driving conditions later in the year. The state has put aside about 50 million dollars to take care of winter weather conditions. But the Department of Transportation has only spent about eight million on maintaining roads so far this winter. Steve Abbott is a spokesman for the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

The US Department of Agriculture says winters aren't as cold as they used to be in North Carolina. It has released its first new map of planting zones in more than 20 years. Tony Avent is the owner of Plant Delights Nursery in Raleigh. He was a technical advisor on the map. He says its detailed, interactive features surpass anything previously available.

Frigid temperatures are affecting many across the state today.

Jeff Tiberii: Eric Murphy is a hot dog vendor in downtown Greensboro. He works in front of City Hall for five and a half hours each week day, serving dogs, chili, chips and drinks. During today’s lunch hour it was 31 degrees.

Hurricane Irene

North Carolina forecasters are keeping an eye on Hurricane Irene as it makes its way toward the southeast. The storm became a Category 2 hurricane late last night and is expected to strengthen to Category 3 later today. Meteorologist Katie Roussy says the latest forecast has North Carolina in the path of the storm.

Residents of North Carolina are being urged to get ready for hurricane season which officially begins next week. Forecasters and other officials are using this week to highlight some of things you can do to prepare for the big storms. Jeff Orrock is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Raleigh. He says a busy forecast means its time to get supplies like food, water, medicine and batteries purchased and organized.


North Carolina's Severe Weather Awareness week is underway. Meteorologists at the National Weather Service in Raleigh say it's the time of year when the threat of thunderstorms and other severe weather returns to the area. Among this week's events is a statewide tornado drill Wednesday morning. Meteorologist Darin Figurskey says seasonal weather changes can cause twisters to develop during the spring and summer months.

Snow and ice this winter is proving costly for the state Department of Transportation. DOT spokesman Steve Abbott says the Department spent more than 31 million dollars through January 18th, already surpassing what was set aside for road clearing. He says that's because of the high number of storms we've seen this winter.

Snow falling in many parts of central North Carolina is expected to turn to freezing rain tonight. A layer of at least a tenth of an inch of ice is likely to form. Brandon Vincent is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. He says the roads will be dangerous.

"We'll see freezing rain and freezing drizzle persisting perhaps all the way through Tuesday morning even into early Tuesday afternoon, so the road situation's going to get pretty bad later this evening and overnight."

weather map


Today marks the start of the official “Winter Weather Preparedness Week.” State emergency officials will be educating the public on ways to be prepared in the event of nasty weather. Jeff Orrock is with the National Weather Service in Raleigh. He says this year’s forecast of an intensified La Nina system means there’s a good chance we’ll see a warmer, drier winter than last year’s: