Wake Forest University

Maya Angelou
Wake Forest University

Maya Angelou lived in a rambling yellow house just down the road from Wake Forest’s campus. A few hours after she passed away inside, people drove by slowly. Some pointed out the window. Everyone was keeping a respectable distance.

Angelou was renowned for many things, including hosting large parties in the house. Most Aprils, Angelou even held a class here.

When Wake Forest University officials invited Jill Abramson to deliver this year's commencement speech, they probably didn't realize they'd be in the midst of one of the biggest media controversies of the year.

Jill Abramson, the former executive editor of The New York Times, addressed her sudden and controversial firing during a commencement address at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Monday.

"Sure, losing a job you love hurts," she admitted. "But the work I revered, journalism that holds powerful institutions and people accountable, is what makes our democracy so resilient. This is the work I will remain very much a part of."

Greensboro City Seal  Benjamin Branch Library, Greensboro, NC
eavemealoneimdigging / Flickr

  This segment live from the Triad Stage in Greensboro.

Greensboro City Council member Zach Matheny announced his plans to run for the 6th congressional race to replace Howard Coble. Plus, Wake Forest University is looking for a new football coach.

Host Frank Stasio gets a Triad news update with Jeff Tiberii, Greensboro Bureau Chief.

Wake Forest graduates at commencement.
Wake Forest University

About 1,000 undergraduates and 600 graduate students received degrees at Wake Forest University's commencement exercises today.  The school's Class of 2013 includes 11 recipients of the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship.  Those students will be taking on post-graduate work ranging from researching regenerative medicine in Sweden to teaching Vietnamese children. 

PBS journalist Gwen Ifill  delivered the commencement address and urged the graduates to keep several promises.

Wake Forest University has entered the next phase of its research project studying morality and character. The school previously called on psychologists to perform behavioral studies. Philosophy Professor Christian Miller says that empirical data is the foundation for the character research. Now, philosophers and theologians will look at the issue.

Some of the country’s premier universities are partnering to form an innovative online classroom program.

A student at Duke or Wake Forest or UNC-Chapel Hill has a dizzying array of classes to choose from on campus. But some of those classes might not be exactly what they want or need, or the classes may not be offered when they need them.  A new partnership called Semester Online aims to change that. The idea is to teach certain classes online, creating an even larger pool of courses for students not only at Duke, Carolina, and Wake, but also at Northwestern, Vanderbilt, and a dozen other elite universities.  Duke Provost Peter Lang says it will be a great opportunity for students.

Wake Forest Debate

Aug 31, 2012

Many voters are looking forward to the Presidential debates this election year, but competitive debaters might say that the civil discourse of our times has given up on formal argumentation. True debate depends on a certain openness and on the possibility that minds can change on the strength of a well-crafted argument. Wake Forest University has an award-winning debate team and their members are already preparing for the upcoming season.

Duke is leading the Atlantic Coast Conference in a statistic not frequently reported in the sports pages. The Blue Devils topped the league in the percentage of student-athletes who graduated in 6 years.

97 percent of the student-athletes who came to Duke in 2004 graduated by 2010. That ties Boston College for the best rate in the ACC. The NCAA graduation rate does not take into account student-athletes who leave school in good academic standing.

Wake Forest University researchers are participating in a project aimed at better projecting upcoming world events.

Instead of using traditional experts, researchers are now enlisting about 1500 everyday citizens as part of a new crowdsourcing model. Wake Forest Associate Psychology Professor Eric Stone says researchers hope to one day better predict political uprisings, terrorist attacks, and even World Cup Winners.