Wake County

New Policy To Control Feral Cats In Wake County

Jun 5, 2012

In the past, Wake County euthanized all unwanted cats. But not anymore. The county is adopting a new approach to control its feral cat population.

Asma Khalid: Feral cats are unsocialized. They can't live indoors. This new policy allows private animal groups the right to trap, neuter, vaccinate and then return these alley cats to the outdoors.  The Wake Audobon Society opposes the plan. It fears more outdoor cats will mean fewer birds. But, Pam Miller says that's not true.

Public transportation has long been a contentious topic in the Triangle. As cities like Charlotte have expanded bus service and built a light-rail system, cities like Raleigh and Durham have failed to keep up.

But now, a plan to increase busses and begin the long process of connecting the cities in the Triangle by rail is just a few steps from being implemented. Those last few steps are proving to be the hardest.

Wake County residents who need mental health care could become UNC Health Care patients later this year.

Voters will go to the polls tomorrow with a lot of decisions to make. Local and statewide nominees will be determined, as will a constitutional amendment that would ban same-sex marriages and civil unions. Local elections boards have seen a unique set of circumstances in preparing for election day.

The second-largest school district in North Carolina is close to choosing a new leader. The search for a new superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools enters a public phase this week.

Wake and Orange counties are the healthiest in the state. That's according to a new study ranking health outcomes by county across the nation. In North Carolina and elsewhere, the healthiest counties tend to be the wealthiest. Michelle Larkin is with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which compiled the study with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

Teams of volunteers are out on the streets and at campsites across Wake and Orange Counties this week, surveying the homeless population. It's part of a national effort to house 100-thousand people who are homeless by the middle of next year. The United Way's Chantelle Fisher-Borne is the coordinator of Triangle Registry Week.

Federal officials say they're willing to hand over details about a proposed immigration detention facility to towns in Wake County provided that local officials keep them a secret. But the request from the General Services Administration could be subject to North Carolina's public records law. Lana Hygh is Cary's liaison to the GSA. She says town officials are trying to determine whether the confidentiality request is allowed under state law.

It’s campaign season in cities and counties across the state. And nowhere are the races more interesting or hotly contested than in Wake County.

Federal investigators are looking into allegations of mistreatment at the Wake County jail. The North Carolina ACLU compiled 57 complaints in 2009 and 2010 from detainees accused of illegal immigration. Some say their rights to due process were violated. The ACLU claims that constitutes a violation of an immigration law called 287(g). It allows the federal government to enter into agreements with local law enforcement to carry out immigration functions. Wake County Sheriff Donnie Harrison: