Voter ID

NC NAACP leader Reverend William Barber speaks to Moral Monday protesters.
Matthew Lenard

Several advocacy organizations have filed suit against the state of North Carolina after Governor Pat McCrory signed broad-based voting reform.  Earlier today, leaders with the NAACP spoke out against the law. Reverend William Barber said it unfairly targets African-American voters.

The American Civil Liberties Union says it’s going to take legal action to stop the country’s newest — and one of its most restrictive — voter ID laws, signed into law yesterday by Republican Governor Pat McCrory of North Carolina.

The new law requires voters to show government-issued photo ID cards, and outlaws college ID cards or out-of-state driver’s licenses as valid forms of identification.

The law also eliminates same-day voter registration, and allows any registered voter to challenge another’s eligibility.

McCrory spoke about his decision to sign HB 589 in a video.
NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill today that requires voters to present a photo ID at the polls, despite opposition from Attorney General Roy Cooper. In addition to requiring a form of photo ID for voters, the bill also shortens early voting by one week. Hours after he signed the bill, the American Civil Liberties Union, the ACLU of North Carolina and the Southern Coalition for Social Justice filed a lawsuit challenging the bill.

N.C. Attorney General Roy Cooper
N.C. Democratic Party

North Carolina's Attorney General, Roy Cooper, is taking a very public stance to urge Governor Pat McCrory to veto a recently passed elections law bill.

Among other things, the bill would shorten early voting by one week and require residents to show approved photo identification at the polls.

Cooper's campaign has sent out a mass email to ask people to sign an online petition requesting the governor veto House Bill 589. He says if passed, the legislation would cause expensive litigation and potential confusion.

The North Carolina Flag
xrmap flag collection /

The North Carolina Senate took an already controversial Voter ID bill and added a host of other restrictions to it this week.

Dave DeWitt

If you plan to vote in a future election in North Carolina, the Voter Information Verification Act – if it passes – affects you. That goes double if you are a younger voter, don’t have a driver’s license, like to vote early, or may ever be subject to a random challenge of your status as a voter.

Protesters gather for a Moral Mondays protest at the capitol.
Matthew Lenard

Another demonstration on Halifax Mall led to 73 arrests Monday night. It was the 12th Moral Monday event protesting the Republican-led General Assembly. 

This demonstration centered on what protestors called undue cuts to education and a bill that would change voting requirements.  Protesters said they don't like the provision in the voter ID bill that would cut back on early voting.

"That’s ridiculous. That’s absolutely ridiculous," said Antoinette Joyner of Winston-Salem.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers in the state Senate have released a new version of a measure that would require residents to present photo IDs at the polls.

The bill was posted on the legislature's website this morning. It would require residents to use one of only seven qualifying forms of photo IDs in order to vote. It does not include university IDs.

The House's version of the bill, which passed three months ago, would allow UNC system and community college students to use their campus ID cards, though it excludes students at private colleges.

GOP Faithful Rally To Back NC's Direction

Jul 17, 2013
North Carolina Legislature passes a tax reform bill.
W Edward Callis III

RALEIGH, N.C. - About 200 supporters expressed their appreciation for North Carolina Republicans efforts to cut taxes, require identification before voting and make getting abortions more difficult.

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Dave Crosby / flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to strike down part of the Voting Rights Act affects a number of southern states, including North Carolina.

Previously, the U.S. Department of Justice or a federal court in Washington had to approve or pre-clear state laws that affect voting, including redistricting. It also had to approve local and municipal decisions in 40 North Carolina counties with a history of voting discrimination.