US/Mexico Border

Felipe de Jesus Molina Mendoza speaking at a protest against the Trump administration’s immigration policies in Raleigh.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

UPDATE: Immigration officials in Charlotte have delayed the deportation order for Felipe de Jesus Molina Mendoza until a federal appeals court renders a decision on his asylum case. 

Mexican-born Felipe de Jesus Molina Mendoza is asking for asylum in the United States. He says he faces harassment if he is forced to return to Mexico because he is openly gay. Last time he was in Mexico, Molina Mendoza says he and a former boyfriend were attacked with beer bottles because of their sexual orientation.

Sign at the U.S. Border
Makaristos via Creative Commons

President Donald Trump signed an executive order ordering a wall along the 2,000 mile Mexican border.

He claims Mexico will pay for it, but Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto says otherwise. He canceled his trip to the U.S. where he was scheduled to meet with President Trump.

Host Frank Stasio talks with KJZZ Mexico City senior field correspondent Jorge Valencia about the latest.

Photo of Claudia Ruíz Massieu and North Carolina legislators
Consulado General de Mexico en Raleigh

More than 35 million of the nation’s immigrant population comes from neighboring Mexico.

And America’s relationship with Mexico is at the top of political headlines, particularly when the GOP presidential candidate advocates building a wall along the 2,000 mile border.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs Claudia Ruíz Massieu.

Immigrants’ rights vigil in Marshall Park, Charlotte, May 1, 2006.
Rosario Machicao / La Noticia, Charlotte

Waves of Mexican immigration to the United States date back to the turn of the 20th century. At the start of the Mexican Revolution, groups of Mexicans moved to the U.S. They quickly became an important part of the blue-collar work force. Though some communities welcomed them, others did not.

Border Odyssey

Jun 23, 2015
Image of US/Mexico border
Charles Thompson

The border that separates the United States from Mexico stretches across four states and spans almost 2,000 miles, but the issues that arise from this separation travel an even greater distance. Immigration touches on the economic, social and political fabric of all 50 states.