UNC Center for Civil Rights

Mark Dorosin, managing attorney at the UNC Center for Civil Rights
Gerry Broome / AP

Two attorneys at the UNC Center for Civil Rights say they plan to carry on the center's mission despite losing their positions. 

UNC Board of Governor's Committee
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

In a committee meeting of the University of North Carolina Board of Governors Tuesday, members voted to approve a litigation ban on the UNC Center for Civil Rights

Board of Governor's committee meeting
Dave Dewitt / WUNC

Updated at 2:55 p.m., August 1, 2017

A committee has approved a ban on courtroom work by a center founded at the University of North Carolina to help the poor and disenfranchised.

In this photo taken May 11, 2017, a crowded room of concerned citizens listen during a public forum in Chapel Hill, N.C., regarding the UNC Center for Civil Rights ability to represent poor and minority clients in court.
Gerry Broome / AP

A ban on courtroom work for a University of North Carolina center that represents the poor and disenfranchised puts the school's "hard-earned reputation at risk" if it leads the closure of the center, the chancellor of UNC's flagship campus says.

In this photo taken Thursday, April 20, 2017 Mark Dorosin, managing attorney at the UNC Center For Civil Rights poses for a photo in his office in Chapel Hill, N.C. The center founded at the University of North Carolina by a fearless civil rights attorney
Gerry Broome / AP

Conservatives unhappy with the work of a civil rights center at the University of North Carolina say a ban on litigation is meant to spare legal clinics while applying only to academic centers.

In this photo taken May 11, 2017, a crowded room of concerned citizens listen during a public forum in Chapel Hill, N.C., regarding the UNC Center for Civil Rights ability to represent poor and minority clients in court.
Gerry Broom / AP

A committee studying alternative paths for a University of North Carolina center that offers legal help to the poor found no options that would allow the center to continue the full breadth of its work while also satisfying conservatives who oppose how it operates.

classroom
Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

A coalition of community members has filed a federal complaint accusing the Harnett County school board of perpetuating racial inequalities within its school system.

Durham Police at Jesus Huerta protest in December 2013
Laura Lee

    

Across the nation, protestors have taken to the street to call for reforms in police action. The protests come in the wake of  two grand juries declining to indict police officers who killed Eric Garner and Michael Brown.

From the coast to the mountains, activists in North Carolina have joined the movement calling for greater police accountability.

Segregation Again

Jun 26, 2014
Photo of African American students getting on a school bus in Grimesland, North Carolina in the 1950s
ECU Digital Collections/Flickr

    

This year marks the 60th anniversary of Brown V. Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court decision that ushered in the era of school desegregation.

UNC Center for Civil Rights
UNC Center for Civil Rights

A new report from the UNC Center for Civil Rights highlights the issues faced by some segregated communities in North Carolina.

The report refers to these neighborhoods as “excluded communities.”

“What we’re talking about are communities that are somehow not fully included in the political, social, civic, and economic life of the state of North Carolina,” says Peter Gilbert, the author of the report

markdorosin.org

Mark Dorosin’s path to civil rights law was never straight. He followed many a winding course, skirting the optimism of teaching, exploring the pride of public office and even holding down the 9 to 5 as a manager at Blockbuster Video.

Attorneys with the UNC-Chapel Hill Law School’s Center for Civil Rights say the three separate school districts in Halifax County are inherently unequal.