UNC Board of Governors

North Carolina A&T School of Nursing
North Carolina A&T

North Carolina A&T's nursing degree program is in peril after the UNC Board of Governors decided to temporarily suspend enrollment.

In 2010 and 2011, fewer than 75 percent of A&T's nursing school passed the National Council Licensure Examination on the first try.  That could have terminated the program, but the Board of Governors gave the nursing school two more years to get passing scores above 85 percent.

GI Bill
UNC

With major military installations and affordable public higher education, North Carolina is well-suited to take advantage of the high number of veterans looking to attend college. The federal government has spent more than $30 billion on the post 9-11 GI bill since revamping it four years ago – a number that is likely to increase sharply as more military personnel are discharged.

A dorm at UNC-Chapel Hill.
madrigals via Flickr, Creative Commons

UNC Board of Governors members voted unanimously to cancel a policy allowing men and women to live together on the Chapel Hill campus.  The vote nullified the UNC Chapel Hill trustee board's endorsement of gender neutral housing.

Some male and female students were going to live together in 32 living spaces set aside in two dorms starting this month.  But the board of governors said that arrangement would be inappropriate.  Chairman Peter Hans says their consideration of the policy included the unfavorable opinions of some state lawmakers.

Carol Folt
unc.edu

Carol Folt couldn’t’ stop smiling as she waited her turn to address the UNC Board of Governors. Color coordinated with her husband in Carolina Blue, the current interim President at Dartmouth College nearly jumped out of her seat after the Board unanimously voted to make her the new chancellor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

“Oh I just have to say I am deeply honored to lead the oldest and finest public university in America,” Folt said.

South Building and the Old Well, UNC Chapel Hill
Dave DeWitt

It will be a busy week for the UNC Board of Governors. In addition to hiring a new chancellor at UNC-Chapel Hill this Friday, the Board is trying to make its case to the legislature and avoid tens of millions of dollars in cuts. 

Including budget cuts and reversions, the Legislature has cut the UNC system’s budget by more than $1 billion in recent years.  If they take Governor Pat McCrory’s suggestion, another $140 million or so will get cut next year.   

A UNC Board of Governors panel says it agrees with most of the findings from an earlier investigation of academic fraud at UNC-Chapel Hill.

The UNC Board of Governors voted today to change the way new tuition revenue can be allocated to need-based financial aid. The new rules allow individual campuses to determine what percentage of tuition revenue can be used to help low-income students. The old policy said 25 % of new tuition revenue had to be set aside for financial aid. The Board also fielded a lot of questions on the future of UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Holden Thorp. Thorp has dealt with scandals involving football, the department of Afro and African-American studies, and the school's top fundraiser.

A review panel is meeting to take a closer look at how academic fraud at UNC-Chapel Hill was investigated and handled.

Dave DeWitt: The five-member panel was created by the UNC Board of Governors. They are meeting today behind closed doors to investigate an academic scandal that involved no-show classes, changed grades, and other improprieties in the African and Afro-American Studies department at UNC Chapel Hill.

Last spring, the UNC system voted to allow campuses to once again raise tuition. As part of the last several rate hikes, schools were mandated to set aside at least 25 percent of new tuition revenue for need-based financial aid for low-income students.

But the UNC Board of Governors will soon decide whether to change that rule. Some Republican members of the Board say the set aside is a “hidden tax” on students who pay full tuition.

The debate over funding need-based financial aid appears to have a political bent.

Peter Hans
Nelson Mullins Law Firm

The UNC system has a new chair for its Board of Governors.

Dave DeWitt: Peter Hans is a UNC-Chapel Hill graduate and a former advisor to 3 U.S. Senators, most recently Republican Richard Burr. Now, he’s the chair of the UNC system’s Board of Governors, with oversight over all 17 member campuses. Hans represents a political shift on the Board. The job has typically been held by Democrats. UNC System President Tom Ross says politics won’t be a factor moving forward.

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