Tropical Storm Arthur

Environment
8:50 am
Thu July 3, 2014

OBX Residents, Visitors Flee Hurricane Arthur

Hurricane Arthur is expecting to pass along the Outer Banks today on its way up the Atlantic Coast.
Credit National Weather Service

Category one Hurricane Arthur has maximum sustained winds of 80 miles per hour.

Hatteras Island residents have begun a mandatory evacuation this morning, and a State of Emergency has been issued for all of Dare County. Hyde County has issued a voluntary evacuation for Ocracoke Island for 2 p.m. today.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Lara Pagano said North Carolinians can expect to feel the effects of the hurricane's outer bands today.

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Business & Economy
8:30 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Tropical Storm Might Send Holiday Travelers To The Mountains

A tropical storm could impact the Outer Banks this July 4th weekend. Asheville is getting ready for holiday travelers, and might see some people redirected by the storm.
Credit Ian Britton / Freefoto.com

AAA is forecasting the busiest July 4th travel weekend since 2001, in part because of a recovering economy. But with a tropical storm headed toward the Outer Banks, travelers might end up making other plans.

It's not yet clear whether Tropical Storm Arthur will make landfall in North Carolina, but Dare County is readying its hurricane action plan, just in case.

On the other side of the state, tourism is up already in Asheville this summer.

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Environment
8:16 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Outer Banks Region Braces For Arthur

The most recent tropical storm named Arthur has formed off the coast of Fla. and is headed toward N.C.
Credit The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Tropical Storm Arthur has formed off the coast of Florida, and is headed toward North Carolina. It isn't clear yet whether it will make landfall later this week.

Cyndy Holda of the Outer Banks Group of National Parks said local governments and businesses have hurricane action plans in place. However, she said, the Independence Day weekend is an inconvenient time for a storm to hit the beaches.

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