Triad Stage

Picture of the cast from 'Beautiful Star'
Triad Stage

The holiday season brings with it many revered holiday performances like "The Nutcracker" and "A Christmas Carol." These stories are cherished and familiar.

"Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity" retells the well-known Christmas story through a humorous and intimate Appalachian lens. The performance returns to the Triad Stage in celebration of the venue's 15th anniversary. 

Flat screen TVs are one of the reasons for the decreasing size of furniture. Many people opt to mount them on the wall, which eliminates the need for an entertainment center.
Jeremy Levine / Flickr Creative Commons

For more than 100 years, the High Point Market has offered furniture and home furnishings to buyers from across the state. Today, the market is the world’s largest furniture trade show.

The furniture industry has been an economic boon for the Triad and it continues to adapt to new needs as the next generation starts to settle down and buy furniture.

Ian Dawson's '1365' is made from plastic. The museum purchased it in 2004, and UNC-Greensboro students use this in 'Art of Seeing' workshops to merge art and science.
Weatherspoon Art Museum

Classroom lectures are only a part of the education of students in the healthcare field. 

The Art of Seeing” program through the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and the Weatherspoon Art Museum gets students out of the classroom by combining contemporary art and science.

27 Views Of Greensboro

Oct 13, 2015
'27 Views Of Greensboro' takes a look at the city in various forms of writing, from poetry to vignettes to short stories.
Charles Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

Greensboro has a rich history, from its days as a leader in textiles and commerce to the “Greensboro Four” sit-in.  

A group of writers with Greensboro ties came together in “27 Views of Greensboro: The Gate City in Prose & Poetry” (Eno Publishers/2015) with essays, vignettes, poems and other short stories to share their perspectives of the Triad city.

Mitchell Oliver

North Carolina native Anne-Claire Niver has been singing since she was a young child. After studying music and vocal performance at UNC-Greensboro and traveling the world, she moved home to North Carolina and started work at a family-owned farm near Rougemont.

Each month WUNC's The State of Things travels to Greensboro for a live show at Triad Stage's UpStage Cabaret. The next show is Tuesday, May 19. The live broadcast starts at noon, but please arrive by 11:45 a.m. to be seated. Please RSVP if you plan to attend.

We'll be joined by:

I Don't Do Boxes is a new LGBTQ magazine created by and for queer youth.
idontdoboxes.org

I Don't Do Boxes is a new magazine that explores and documents the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender experience in the southeast United States. The magazine was founded and edited by the youth-led media program QueerLab. Each issue is designed to provide a unique look at what it means to be queer in the South by tackling topics like identifying as LGBTQ in school or the power of documenting LGBTQ voices.

Black and white photo of band on couch.
thegenuinemusic.com

The Genuine is a four-piece band from Winston-Salem. The band originally began as a project of husband and wife Mathew Allivato and Katelyn Allivato née Brouwer, but now includes an electric guitar, piano and percussion. They are one of the many bands performing at Phuzz Phest in Winston-Salem April 17th -19th, and they will preview their festival performance with a live in-studio performance.

The State of Things is headed back to Greensboro's Triad Stage on April 14th for a live broadcast of the show. 

Here's a preview of what we'll be talking about on the show...

Image of Greensboro Skyline
Beyonce245 / Wikimedia Commons

Two controversial redistricting bills passed last week in the Senate are headed for debate on the House floor. 

Senate Bill 181, introduced by Republican Chad Barefoot of Wake County, modifies the boundaries for Wake County Commissioner Seats. Senate Bill 36, introduced by Republican Trudy Wade of Guilford County, reconfigures the Greensboro City Council to a seven-member body in which the mayor has no voting power.  Both bills raise questions about the role of state lawmakers in controlling local governing bodies. 

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