Triad Stage

Image of football players
Creative Commons/ stnorbert

The NCAA reports college athletes suffer more than 10,000 concussions a year, but perhaps more alarming is the fact that about three-quarters of these cases are not reported to coaches or team doctors.

Two public health experts at UNC-Greensboro have received grants from the Department of Defense and NCAA to help encourage these players report their injuries and change the culture of concussions. 

Image of Meredith Sawyer, early childhood educator in Greensboro who earns less than a living wage
Duke Center for Documentary Studies

An estimated 20 percent of North Carolinians earn less than a "living wage."

Advocates refer to that term as the household income needed to cover housing, food, child care, healthcare, transportation, taxes and other necessities.

A new interactive video exhibit from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University tells the stories of these workers and explores the options for new policies that might help them. 

Scuppernong Books hosts a monthly public series called 'Ask A Muslim Anything' for participants break down barriers and learn more about Islam.
Deonna Kelli Sayed

Hate crimes targeting Muslims, their mosques and businesses tripled in 2015, according to a study from California State University, San Bernadino. And Islamphobobic rhetoric has been ubiquitous in political discourse since the deadly attacks in Paris and California. 

But how are Muslims affected in North Carolina? A new ongoing public series at Greensboro's Scuppernong Books, “Ask a Muslim Anything,” brings together diverse Muslims from the state with other members of their community for an “informal chat about Muslimy things.”

Image of two polar bears on ice sheet suffering the effects of climate change
Jessica Robertson / U.S. Geological Survey

Climate change was a prominent global topic in 2015, with both the Paris climate talks and the Pope’s encyclical stirring up conversation about the future of the planet.

But questions remain about what role businesses and community institutions should play in the ongoing effort. Some say that the Pope’s encyclical speaks to a need for religious leaders to step up in the movement, while others say that the business community needs to take the lead.

An image of the Greensboro city skyline
Turboknowledge / Wiki creative commons

The Triad region was a case study for many of North Carolina's top news stories in 2015. Greensboro is part of the lawsuit against the latest round of redistricting in the state. The merger between Reynolds American Inc. and the Lorillard Tobacco Company rocked the local economy. Many of the effects of the 2015 events will carry into the new year. 

Frank Stasio and Stimp Hawkins share a laugh as Frank tries out the cremation casket.
Ivan Saul Cutler

Retired minister Stimp Hawkins wants to say goodbye before it is too late. The 81-year-old, who has DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) tattooed brazenly across his chest, spends a lot of time thinking about the end of his life and his eventual death.

He hosts monthly meetings called “Café Mortal” and “Death Café” in Greensboro for people to discuss issues related to death and end-of-life concerns. Hawkins recently celebrated his death wish at a decoration party for his cremation casket.

Building A Guitar From Scratch

Jan 12, 2016
Alex Edney (L) and Terry Fritz (R) discussing the bracing on the sides of a guitar.
Fritz and Edney Guitars

Terry Fritz had two loves for most of his life: playing guitar and woodworking. During a job change in 2006, a friend suggested he marry those two passions as a luthier. Fritz quickly fell in love with the process – the properties of wood necessary for a good guitar, how to fasten the neck, the geometry that shapes the timbre of an acoustic guitar, etc.

Image of producer Andrew Tie
Charlie Shelton

As the year draws to a close, “The State of Things” is taking a moment to reflect on the highlights of 2015 with the program’s producers.

Producer Andrew Tie’s favorite segments include conversations about mass incarceration and another about confederate monuments on state grounds.

NC A&T

Harold Martin is the first former student of North Carolina A&T State University to lead his alma mater.

During Martin's tenure, the school gained the distinction as one of the top universities for land grant scholarships in the country and third in the UNC system in sponsored research funding.

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