Transportation

Work crews are making changes to freeways in R-T-P as they build the new Triangle Expressway. The short segment of the Durham Freeway south of I-40 closed for good this week. That section of Highway 147 provided a quick connection to T-W Alexander Drive in south Durham. It will eventually be part of the Triangle Expressway, a toll road running along the west side of Raleigh from Morrisville to Holly Springs. D-O-T spokeswoman Holly Allen says drivers going south on the Durham Freeway should take a detour via I-40.

The town of Chapel Hill is cracking down on residents who illegally park their cars in their front yards. Town officials say citation officers will start giving out tickets for those who violate the town ordinance at the beginning of next month. The issue came to light after residents reported widespread violations in the Pine Knolls and Northside neighborhoods. Rae Buckley of the Chapel Hill planning department says those areas are popular among UNC students who rent houses. But she says lawn parking causes concern for permanent residents.

Transportation issues will be the focus of a series of public meetings this week in Durham, Chapel Hill and Hillsborough. State and local officials are trying to deal with clogged roads and highways with plenty of growth still to come. Andrew Henry is a transportation planner for the Durham, Chapel Hill, Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization. He says there are at least two answers to the problem.

Officials gathered in Raleigh today to christen a new Capitol Area Transit operations and maintenance facility. The facility is needed to accommodate a rise in demand on the city's bus fleet.

Andrew High is from congressman David Price's office. He says the money for the maintenance facility came from federal funds. High says it will help with more people using public transportation.

Triangle Transit Authority wants to hear from residents about plans for expanding bus and rail lines as the population grows. Transit experts will be on hand at a series of meetings this week to present a proposals for Wake, Durham, and Orange Counties. The U.S. Census Bureau expects more than a million more people will be in the Triangle by 2030. Brad Schulz of Triangle Transit says this week's meetings get under way tonight in Raleigh:

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 29, 2008

As Wake county grows, more and more major transit arteries are slowing to a crawl. Some say the answer is more roads. Others say it’s fewer cars. And Triangle commuters are literally stuck in the middle.

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 28, 2008

As a part of our ongoing coverage of Growth and Sustainability -- this week on Morning Edition we're featuring a North Carolina Voices series on Transportation. One form of transit stands out for it’s energy efficiency, health benefits and fun – that’s people-powered transportation. But in the Triangle, that can be tough. It’s a place that’s been built primarily for cars -- and many bikers says it’s just too dangerous to consider getting to work on two wheels or feet.

A newly proposed mass transit plan for the Triangle could link Chapel Hill to North Raleigh by bus and rail as early as 2020. It’s the suggestion of a 29 member regional organization called the Special Transit Advisory Group. As it stands right now, the proposal would greatly expand local and regional bus service, and add some form of rail transit later on.

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