Trail of Tears

Members of the Cherokee Nation bike from North Carolina to Oklahoma to remember those forced to march on the Trail of Tears.
Remember the Removal / Facebook

Members of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee are on a bike ride with members of the Cherokee Nation from Oklahoma.

The 950-mile ride commemorates the Trail of Tears forced march in 1839.  Michell Hicks is the Principle Chief of the Eastern Band based in North Carolina.

"We have riders from the Eastern Band of the Cherokee and we have riders coming home from Oklahoma with the Cherokee Nation that are going to be on about a three week journey."

John Pemble / Flickr Creative Commons

Part of U.S. President Andrew Jackson's reputation is that of a man who helped the country expand in the early 19th century, but it came at a terrible cost.

Jackson sparred with American Indian tribes for decades, culminating in the infamous Trail of Tears, a forced relocation that killed thousands of them.

A lesser known part of that history is centered around Cherokee chief John Ross, who was doing all he could to peacefully assimilate his people, including a long, personal battle with Jackson.

Wikimedia Commons


Many people know that during the Trail of Tears, tens of thousands of American Indians were forced to walk to Oklahoma.