Ntozake Shange’s 1977 choreopoem, “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf” rocked audiences when it was initially staged in California and later on Broadway. It has since been performed on stage countless times around the world and was recently adapted into a film directed by Tyler Perry.

Jude the Obscure

May 1, 2012

When "Jude the Obscure" was published in 1895, the criticism Thomas Hardy received was so harsh that he vowed never to write another book. And he didn’t. Time has ushered this novel into the English canon, and now the Burning Coal Theatre is resurrecting it for the stage as a two-part musical. Host Frank Stasio talks to the play’s director, Jerome Davis, and playwright Ian Finley to discuss the relevance of Hardy’s work more than a century after it was published. Actors Stephen Letrent and Alice Rothman-Hicks, playing Jude and Sue respectively, join to perform scenes from the play.

Enron on Stage

Sep 13, 2011

Ten years ago, Enron became the ultimate symbol of corporate malfeasance. The company robbed Americans of billions of dollars, helped destroy accounting giant Arthur Andersen and caused rolling blackouts across California. Burning Coal Theatre Company in Raleigh is revisiting this dark chapter in American corporate history with the play, “Enron,” on stage now through September 25th.

Dog Sees God

Aug 19, 2011
God Sees God

Charlie Brown and the Peanuts crew have delighted fans for more than half a century. But what happens when those innocent kids become teenagers? In the play “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead,” Linus is a pothead, Snoopy is dead, Lucy is imprisoned and Pigpen is a germaphobe. Good grief! Raleigh Ensemble Players will be performing “Dogs Sees God,” which follows the Peanuts gang in high school as they deal with the drama and turbulence of the teen years.

The National Black Theatre Festival is a longstanding tradition in Winston-Salem. Founded in 1989 by North Carolina native Larry Leon Hamlin, the biennial celebration of African-American stage performance draws thousands of people to the Triad.