Teachers

The State of Things
1:39 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

School Boards Challenge The Elimination Of Teacher Tenure

Broughton High School teacher Lee Quinn speaks out against the 25 percent mandate.
Credit Dave DeWitt

Durham school board members voted unanimously yesterday to join a lawsuit that challenges the elimination of teacher tenure and replaces it with a selective performance pay system. 

Read more
Education
8:35 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Gov. McCrory To Review Law Repealing Teacher Tenure

Credit NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory says his staff will consider making changes to a new law that offers raises to top teachers who give up tenure rights.

Under the law, teacher tenure will be phased out by 2018 and replaced with a plan that requires local school districts to pick the top 25-percent of teachers who will be offered four-year contracts and bonuses.

“I think it’s an example of passing a policy without clearly understanding the execution,” McCrory said.

Read more
The State of Things
12:16 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

State Legislators Propose Merit Pay For Teachers

Teachers protest
Credit Dave DeWitt

A task force created by the legislature last year met earlier this week to discuss incentives for good teaching. Some Republican leaders favor a merit pay system that would reward a limited number of teachers based on their individual performances. But many educators believe this would discourage collaboration within their schools. 

Read more
Education
8:15 am
Wed February 26, 2014

'16 Years To Reach $40,000 Salary': Considering Pay Incentives For NC Teachers

Teachers protest
Credit Dave DeWitt

State lawmakers and education leaders are considering paying North Carolina teachers based on their individual performance, despite  concerns from stakeholders who argue it could harmfully affect students and teacher morale.

Republican Senator Jerry Tillman, an education budget writer, is helping lead a newly-formed legislative task force that will develop recommendations for alternative pay plans. Members, whom include legislators and education leaders across the state, must factor in teacher evaluation measures and student performance outcomes.  

Read more
Education
8:36 am
Fri February 21, 2014

N.C. Leaders, Educators Evaluate Common Core Rollout

North Carolina legislators are still struggling with Common Core standards in schools.
Credit Photo by biologycorner. - http://spotlight.macfound.org/blog/entry/future-of-testing-and-data-driven-learning/#sthash.ANdJLjay.dpuf / MacArthur Foundation

North Carolina lawmakers continue to scrutinize the implementation of Common Core Standards, as they collect suggestions from leaders and educators to improve, amend or even replace them.

The state adopted the standards in 2010, though they were first implemented last school year. They are supposed to set a clear, consistent blueprint for what students across should learn from kindergarten through high school.

Implemented in 45 states, Common Core creates goals and rigorous tests that are intended to look the same across the country.  

Read more
Education
7:48 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Teachers Ask Durham To Refuse Tenure Law, Sue The State

The North Carolina Association of Educators is organizing teachers and advocates to resist a state law that would require school boards to offer raises to the top 25 percent of teachers in exchange for giving up tenure.
Credit North Carolina Association of Educators

Some teachers and advocates with the N.C. Association of Educators are asking the Durham Board of Education to follow Guilford County's lead and decline to comply with a new state education law.

The General Assembly passed a budget that eliminates tenure in 2018. Meanwhile, school districts will offer the top 25 percent of teachers four-year contracts and $500 raises to relinquish their status.

Hillside High School teacher Nicholas Graber-Grace said the model is stacked against teachers with disadvantaged students, and it discourages collaboration among colleagues.

Read more
Education
5:34 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Pay Cuts, End Of Tenure Put North Carolina Teachers On Edge

Elementary school students in North Carolina stand outside their school in November, during an event organized by teachers to protest changes in public education.
Dave DeWitt WUNC

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 8:00 pm

Teacher salaries are losing ground fast in North Carolina.

Jennifer Spivey has been a teacher for three years at South Columbus High School, on the north side of the border between the Carolinas. She's been recognized as an outstanding teacher; she has a master's degree, and last summer she won a prestigious Kenan fellowship to improve education. But she still lives in her parents' basement.

Read more
The State of Things
11:56 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Republican Leaders Raise Starting Teacher Pay

Gov. McCrory speaks to the Emerging Issues Forum on Monday.
Credit Dave DeWitt

After ongoing controversy about educator pay, Governor Pat McCrory announced a plan to increase salaries for new teachers yesterday. Under this plan, the base pay for the state’s beginning teachers will increase to $35,000 over the next two years, bringing North Carolina starting teacher pay in line with that of border states like Virginia, Tennessee and South Carolina.

Read more
Education
7:36 am
Wed December 18, 2013

NC Teachers File Lawsuit Challenging Tenure Repeal

NCAE, along with six plaintiffs, filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging the repeal of career status, which has been around since 1971.
Credit SalFalko via Flickr

The N.C. Association of Educators filed a second major education lawsuit in a week, this time challenging the end of tenureotherwise known as career statusfor North Carolina public school teachers.

The lawsuit, also filed by six classroom teachers, argues that the repeal of career status violates federal and state constitutions by taking away basic due process rights.

Read more
Education
12:00 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Happy Holidays Teacher, Here's A Toe Ring

What visions of sugar plums dance in teachers' heads?
Credit Miracle on 34th Street movie

Update 12/17/13, 10:00 a.m.:

In recent days we've asked teachers to tell us about unusual gifts they've received from students. The stories keep coming in.

Sue Edelberg is an ESL teacher at Clayton Middle School. She writes:

I'm a first year teacher so I've yet to receive a strange gift, but last week I received a very unique and creative gift: it was a little box made out of notebook paper, from a 6th grader who loves origami and magic tricks.  It had an X on it, so he said it was supposed to be  an X Box.

Read more

Pages