A new report shows that the teacher turnover rate has been steadily climbing since 2010.
Gates Foundation via Flickr

An annual report shows that more North Carolina teachers left their jobs in 2012-13 than in previous school years.

Out of the 95,028 teachers employed, 13,616 teachers left their districts, resulting in an overall state turnover rate of about 14 percent, or about one out of every seven teachers.  

That number is a slight increase from the previous year’s turnover rate of 12 percent and 11 percent in 2010-11.

Lawmakers voted this summer to eventually eliminate teacher tenure, replacing it with temporary contracts. The State Board of Education will discuss a model contract this week.
cybrarian77 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cybrarian77/6284181389

 The State Board of Education is expected to approve a model employment contract for teachers this week, as teacher tenures will end within the next few years. 

The model is expected to give local school boards some guidance when drafting their own pacts with teachers.

Wake County School Bus
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Sweeping reforms in education laws this year angered many teachers.

Hundreds protested the lack of a pay increase, the elimination of tenure and the end of the master’s degree supplement. For the more than 95,000 teachers across the state, the day-to-day challenges in the classroom continue.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Dave DeWitt, WUNC’s Raleigh Bureau Chief and Education reporter, about his latest series on the profession.

Teachers demonstrate Monday morning outside Riverside High School in Durham
Dave DeWitt


This week, North Carolina teachers protested funding shortages in the education system by staging walk-ins across the state.

Many were upset by budget cuts that affect instruction for the state’s more than 1.5 million students. Host Frank Stasio talks to North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction June Atkinson about the plight facing the state’s K-12 education system.

A student holds a sign in support of teachers outside a demonstration at Durham's EK Powe Elementary School.
Dave DeWitt


Yesterday, hundreds of North Carolina teachers staged “walk-ins” to protest recent cuts to spending and another year without raises.

But many Republican lawmakers claim the state’s education budget is actually higher than it has ever been. Host Frank Stasio talks with Dave DeWitt, WUNC’s Raleigh Bureau Chief and Education Reporter about the politics behind yesterday’s walk-ins.

Center for Teaching Quality

Teachers who excel in instruction are often encouraged to pursue administration. But what if teachers could take on leadership roles and influence policy without giving up their job in the classroom?

A teacher reads to elementary school students.
Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

Michael Martin is a teacher. His wife is a teacher’s assistant. They love their jobs and work in adjacent rooms in their school in Buncombe County, teaching special needs students and raising three kids of their own. But their life’s work comes with a real-world sacrifice, here in the state that ranks 48th in the country in teacher salaries.

McCrory spoke about his decision to sign HB 589 in a video.
NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill today that requires voters to present a photo ID at the polls, despite opposition from Attorney General Roy Cooper. In addition to requiring a form of photo ID for voters, the bill also shortens early voting by one week. Hours after he signed the bill, the American Civil Liberties Union, the ACLU of North Carolina and the Southern Coalition for Social Justice filed a lawsuit challenging the bill.

Gov. Pat McCrory
Gurnal Scott

Governor Pat McCrory has a teaching degree. His grandmother was a teacher and his sister taught for 20 years in Wake County. He says frequently that he respects the profession and that teachers are the most important part of the state’s public education system.

The Governor continued that line of praise in his speech at the North Carolina Chamber of Commerce’s Education summit.

“I have a great admiration for teachers and they have a greater challenge than any of us have in this room at this point in time,” he said.

Ann Goodnight
NC State University

Ann Goodnight is not happy. In a letter-to-the-editor in the News and Observer, she goes after the state budget and the leaders who wrote and passed it:

We are knowingly under-investing in our pre-K-12, community college and university students; in our teachers; and in innovative new approaches to learning. This budget is an embarrassment in its lack of investment in the skills and competitiveness of its people. This is a grievous mistake.

Students in a Guilford County classroom.
Guilford County Schools

Lawmakers in Raleigh may end tenure for public school teachers. That’s if a provision in the proposed Senate budget remains in the final budget under negotiation.

Tenure for public school teachers isn’t the same as tenure for college professors. For one, it’s much easier to fire public school teachers with tenure or, as it’s described in the education world, to “counsel them out of teaching.”

Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

As leaders in state government haggle over what to include – or not include – in the final budget, teachers across North Carolina are concerned about their jobs and their salaries. 

Teacher salaries in North Carolina have not moved much in recent years. Most of that has been due to the recession. But as other states begin to increase teacher salaries as the economy improves, North Carolina has cut teacher salaries by more than 15 percent.

Wikimedia Commons

Four North Carolina teacher training programs are among the worst in the country, according to a report from the National Council on Teacher Quality.

Teacher education programs have come under fire from many different sides, but the latest report from the National Council on Teacher Quality paints an especially bleak picture. 

NC Legislative building
NC General Assembly

House lawmakers have passed a bill that would revamp teacher tenure in North Carolina. The measure has bipartisan support and passed 113 to 1.

North Carolina House of Representatives, North Carolina General Assembly

A state House committee has approved a measure in committee that would revamp teacher tenure in the state.

A subsidized housing facility for teachers opens on Hatteras Island today in an effort to lure talent to Dare County schools. The Dare Education Foundation held a ribbon-cutting ceremony this afternoon in Buxton for a building with 12 reduced-rent apartments. The island has two public schools with a total of nearly 600 students. Dare Education Foundation executive director Elizabeth Piff says teachers on Hatteras Island have a hard time finding housing they can afford. As a result, a given class can sometimes have four different teachers in the course of one school year.

Teaching The Civil War

Jun 13, 2011
Brick wall At Stagville
Dave DeWitt

The first public school in North Carolina was created in 1840. Before the Civil War, those schools were reserved only for Whites. And then, four years after the war ended, the system was revived.

Segregated schools were the law in the state for much of the 20th century. And as you might imagine, the Civil War was taught much differently depending on the color of the students’ skin.

Many school districts are beginning to lay off teachers and other employees in anticipation of deep budget cuts by lawmakers. A budget plan approved by the state House would cut public education by almost a billion dollars. State senators haven't come up with a final plan yet, but Republican budget writers say they'd like to cut a hundred million dollars more than the House would. Jennifer Tuft is a kindergarten teacher in Randolph County who found out last week that her position will be cut. 

Teachers March For Jobs

Mar 18, 2011
Teachers protesting
Dave DeWitt

More than 1,000 teachers from around the state took to the streets of Raleigh today. They were in town for the North Carolina Association of Educators annual conference. They are protesting, in part, against possible budget cuts in the General Assembly that could lead to tens of thousands of teachers and school personnel being laid off. The Legislature is trying to plug a $2.5 billion dollar budget gap.

The North Carolina Association of Educators will hold its annual convention in Raleigh today. The teachers' group is also expected to march through the city streets.

North Carolina's teachers are facing thousands of potential layoffs across the state and a nationwide trend portraying them as entrenched and ineffective.