Supreme Court

Supreme Court building, Washington, DC, USA. Front facade.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Daderot

The U.S Supreme Court will take up a case this week that potentially puts half a million North Carolinians at risk of losing their subsidized health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

In King v. Burwellthe high court will examine whether the federal government can assist in paying insurance premiums for all Americans or if it can only offer funds in states that have created their own health care exchanges.

A picture of the US Supreme Court building.
Daderot / Wikipedia

The US Supreme Court has upheld North Carolina's limits on how long people have to file pollution-related lawsuits.

The case involved pollution connected with a CTS Corp. manufacturing plant in Asheville. But the decision undercut families trying to sue over groundwater pollution at Camp Lejeune.

The United States Supreme Court
Jeff Kubina

Two landmark decisions handed down by the United States Supreme Court last week could have serious implications for North Carolina. Justices struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, leaving southern states free to pursue changes to election law without prior federal approval. The court also struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act, saying that same-sex couples are entitled to the same benefits as heterosexual couples.

A man waves a flag in support of gay rights in front of the Supreme Court building.
Victoria Pickering via Flickr, Creative Commons

Yesterday's ruling on same sex marriage by the US Supreme Court does not open the door for gay marriages in North Carolina. The court ruled individual states can continue to decide whether they will allow same sex marriage. Last year, voters in North Carolina added Amendment One to the state constitution defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

So, while gay rights activists across the country celebrated the rulings this week, the gay community in North Carolina faced a different scenario – they're happy for gays across the country, but still can’t get married in their home state.

Update at 10:45 A.M. ET:

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Dave Crosby / flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to strike down part of the Voting Rights Act affects a number of southern states, including North Carolina.

Previously, the U.S. Department of Justice or a federal court in Washington had to approve or pre-clear state laws that affect voting, including redistricting. It also had to approve local and municipal decisions in 40 North Carolina counties with a history of voting discrimination.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is the keynote speaker at this year's meeting of the NC Bar Association.
Stephen Masker / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is in North Carolina this week for the state Bar Association's annual meeting. 

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Obama's healthcare overhaul sparked a range of reactions across North Carolina.

Tanner Latham: A rally to celebrate the Supreme Court's decision on Obama's healthcare law was held Thursday at Gaffney Health Services on Albemarle Road in East Charlotte.

The President's health care law survived a crucial test in the Supreme Court today. But, experts say the political fight isn't finished.

Asma Khalid: The Supreme Court voted 5-to-4 to uphold most of the Affordable Care Act. That surprised Karen Duqette. She works at the Republican-leaning Civitas Institute.

Karen Duqette: I think this decision is going to have a major impact on rallying conservatives.

Jonathan Oberlander agrees. He's a professor of health policy at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

As the ad wars escalate in the GOP primary race, North Carolina congressman David Price is proposing a requirement that Super PAC donors be identified in the political ads they fund.

The Triangle Democrat says the Supreme Court made a terrible decision in the "Citizens United" case, which allows unlimited corporate and union money to flow into political ads. Price says a new Supreme Court or a constitutional amendment will be needed to overturn that decision.