Students

Classroom
WUNC File Photo

North Carolina lawmakers passed several education-related bills on Wednesday, just hours before their legislative “crossover” deadline. Most bills that do not involve money must pass either chamber by Thursday at midnight to have a greater chance of surviving the session. Education bills passed by either chamber include:  

Greater Penalty For Assaulting Teachers

Eighth-grade students Yasmine Boufedji, Angelycia Bogart, Dunya Alkaissi, and Nassir Jordan.
Reema Khrais

As principal Mussarut Jabeen makes her way to the playground, two very young girls run to her, pleading for undivided attention. The first shows off a temporary henna tattoo.

“Oh look at your henna, it’s so pretty,” exclaims Jabeen, principal of Al-Iman, a private Islamic school in Raleigh.

The other girl has just fallen and scraped herself.

“Oh, my little,” Jabeen says. “How about we wash it?”

NC Legislative Building,
Dave DeWitt

Lawmakers in the state House have until the end of the day to file any bills they have not yet submitted. 

Hundreds of proposals are already up for debate this session. One plan would require university professors to teach four courses per semester to keep their salaries. 

goduke.com

In men's college basketball, the Duke Blue Devils are one game away from another National Championship. 

Duke beat Michigan State 81-61 in the Final Four Saturday. That was the highest point total the Blue Devils have allowed in the NCAA Tournament.

Coach Mike Krzyzewski praised his freshmen-heavy team's defense.

"These guys have learned at a quicker rate, though, than I would have expected from a young team. We've been outstanding on the defensive end, primarily in a man-to-man, but with some modifications."

students with laptops in classroom
Enokson / Flickr/Creative Commons

Some North Carolina lawmakers are trying to pass a bill they say will help ease the burdensome paperwork teachers face. They want to get rid of “personal education plans," documents teachers are required to fill out to help students who are at-risk of failing.  

Many teachers and advocates see them as inefficient, raising questions about how to adequately support struggling students.

monopoly set
William Warby / Flickr/Creative Commons

Yesterday, NC State announced that a group of students would try to break the Guinness world record for number people playing Monopoly "in a single venue."

"Apparently the record is only 277 people. We're going to have around 45 to 50 tables of eight players," said Mick Kulikowski in the press office.

Students Richard Phillips and Matthew Bunyi perform the song 'Stand By Me' prior to the call-to-prayer.
Megan Morr / Duke University Photography

Updated Friday 7:00 p.m.:

Hundreds of people stood on Duke University’s campus today in the shadow of a 210-foot Gothic chapel, listening to a wireless speaker that sat on the steps of the entrance.  

Had things gone differently this week the chant would’ve come from the top of the bell tower – not the bottom.

Classroom
WUNC File Photo

All North Carolina high school students will be graded on a 10-point scale starting next school year, a change State Board of Education members approved Thursday. 

That means students will earn A’s if they score between 90 and 100. Currently, they’re graded on a 7-point scale.

State officials had previously decided in October to phase in the new 10-point scale with next year’s freshmen class. But Rebecca Garland, Deputy State Superintendent for the Department of Public Instruction, said that decision upset parents, students, teachers and superintendents.

iPad with a notebook next to it
Sean MacEntee / Flickr/Creative Commons

Thirteen public schools in Wake County will soon be asking students to bring their tablets, smartphones, iPads and laptops to class.

The elementary, middle and high schools are participating in a pilot program called BYOD, or Bring Your Own Device, that will be rolled out over the next couple of months.

East Chapel Hill High School students
Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

A state commission in charge of reworking the Common Core academic standards has begun reviewing them.  

Members spent hours on Monday learning what's expected under Common Core in terms of English and language arts. Some of those goals include when students should know how to explain their ideas or comprehend certain texts.  

The 11 members were politically appointed to review and possibly make changes to the academic standards after lawmakers heard complaints from parents and teachers that they do not progress in a natural or developmentally appropriate way.

Pages